Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

MARCH 19, 2014 USING DATA TO INFORM PROGRAM DESIGN.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "MARCH 19, 2014 USING DATA TO INFORM PROGRAM DESIGN."— Presentation transcript:

1 MARCH 19, 2014 USING DATA TO INFORM PROGRAM DESIGN

2 TECHNICAL DETAILS  Call-in number is (415) 655- 0053 and access code is 911- 985-160.  To submit live questions, click on the “Questions” panel, type your question, and click “Send”  Presentation materials and audio will be posted at www.cacollegepathways.org www.cacollegepathways.org

3 GETTING STARTED  Community colleges can pull an automatic data report through CalPASS Plus  4-year universities who participate in CalPASS Plus can access a report by providing a cohort file to CalPASS Plus  4-year universities not participating in CalPASS Plus should work with campus Institutional Research Department to generate data Visit www.cacollegepathways.org/data-resources for detailed resourceswww.cacollegepathways.org/data-resources

4 KATHY BOOTH

5 AGENDA Making the case: why data is all the rage and why this is a good thing for practitioners and service providers Making it real: examples of data points you could look at and what you could do with this information Making it work: tips for working with data

6 WHY THE FOCUS ON DATA?  Shift from activities to outcomes helps put the focus on foster youth  Increasing availability of data means more opportunities to understand what happens to your students and clients  Funding reductions accelerated the focus on “return on investment”

7 DATA IS THE DOORWAY TO INQUIRY Embedded classroom assessments Student interviews, focus groups, and surveys Affective as well as academic information Seeing how others address similar problems Quantitative numbers show you where to start digging with qualitative tools like: While the emphasis on outcomes might seem to be numbers-focused, the answers aren’t always there.

8 WHAT SHOULD I EXPECT? It’s messy—data analysis always results in more questions It’s flawed—because practitioners have had little access to data to check for accuracy, there are likely to be errors It’s sobering—you can see just how big the barriers to success are It’s exciting—it can renew your passion for your work

9 WHAT COULD I GAIN?  Reduced isolation—you can use data to break down the silos within your institution and across service providers  Additional insights—not only will you better understand barriers to success, you’ll know where you are making a difference  Better bargaining power—you can use the data to make the case for changes to policy or access to resources

10 SNAPSHOT ONE: SEEING THE WHOLE PIPELINE For foster youth at College X:  72% take remedial math, English, or ESL  27% take college-level math  21% take college-level English  39% get financial aid  72% have an educational plan  15% go into career & technical education  28% get a degree or certificate  29% enroll in college within a year of graduating from high school

11 SNAPSHOT ONE: COLLEGE READINESS Take a closer look:  72% take remedial math, English, or ESL  27% take college-level math  21% take college-level English What does this tell us?  Most students do not start in college-level math or English when they enter What questions could you ask?  Social Services: How could students be alerted about the importance of preparing for college assessment tests?  High Schools: How could the curriculum be better aligned to prepare students for college-level work?  Colleges: Could test prep opportunities be offered to foster youth?

12 SNAPSHOT ONE: FINANCIAL SUPPORT Take a closer look:  39% get financial aid  72% have an educational plan  29% enroll in college within a year of graduating from high school What does this tell us?  Most students are getting some sort of counseling when they enter, but after a gap in their education and few are accessing financial supports What questions could you ask?  Social Services: Could more focus be put on helping students identify financial aid options?  High Schools: Would having students fill out the FAFSA while still in high school make them better able to afford going to college right away?  Colleges: How could ed planning sessions be paired with financial aid advising?

13 SNAPSHOT ONE: PROGRAMS OF STUDY Take a closer look:  72% have an educational plan  15% go into career & technical education  28% get a degree or certificate What does this tell us?  Most students appear to be establishing a clear direction for their studies  Students are pursuing degrees, rather than career & technical education certificates  Very few students are making it through What questions could you ask?  Social Services: Could students be informed about stackable certificates that would enable students to get a living wage while preparing for further study in that pathway?  High Schools: What types of preparation might help foster youth persist once they make it to college?  Colleges: Is there a pattern to when students drop out that points to a needed intervention?

14 SNAPSHOT TWO: GROWING A SUCCESS For foster youth at College Y:  44% take remedial math, English, or ESL  28% take college-level math  62% take college-level English  78% get financial aid  62% have an educational plan  4% go into career & technical education  57% get a degree or certificate  18% enroll in college within a year of graduating from high school

15 SNAPSHOT TWO: COLLEGE READINESS Take a closer look:  44% take remedial math, English, or ESL  28% take college-level math  62% take college-level English What does this tell us?  Many students are ready for college-level content  Students are much less likely to take remedial English than math What questions could you ask?  Social Services: Could child welfare agencies partner with FYS, K-12 districts, and colleges to expand college preparatory offerings?  High Schools: How is content aligned with K-12 in English? Are there lessons that could be shared with math?  Colleges: What practices seem to help foster youth prepare for college-level math the most? How could those be expanded?

16 SNAPSHOT TWO: FINANCIAL SUPPORT Take a closer look:  78% get financial aid  18% enroll in college within a year of graduating from high school What does this tell us?  While most students experience a gap in their education, the majority are accessing financial supports once they get there What questions could you ask?  Social Services/High Schools: Are there strong practices that help foster youth access financial aid while still in high school? How could these programs be expanded to help more students go straight to college?  Colleges: How is financial aid advising structured once they get to college? How could this approach be adapted so that all foster youth have the opportunity to apply for aid?

17 SNAPSHOT TWO: PROGRAMS OF STUDY Take a closer look:  62% have an educational plan  4% go into career & technical education  57% get a degree or certificate What does this tell us?  Most students appear to be establishing a clear direction for their studies  Students are pursuing degrees, rather than career & technical education certificates  The majority of students are making it through What questions could you ask?  Social Services/High Schools: How could college advising practices be built upon so that more students have the opportunity to create an education plan while still in high school?  Colleges: What types of degrees are students pursuing, where are they most successful, and what types of supports do they have to help them reach that goal? How could those practices be shared with programs that have lower completion rates?

18 TIP: UNDERSTAND YOUR DATA If you are gathering comprehensive program-level outcomes for the first time, your peers are likely to be curious about how these metrics were derived. Partner with someone who is familiar with the data to be able to explain who is included in each metrics and where the numbers come from.

19 TIP: IDENTIFY DATA COLLECTION PROBLEMS Some institutions may suffer from poor quality data entry practices that miscode or fail to count critical information. If the figures seem off-base, it may be helpful to track how these numbers get coded and collected and determine if there is a way to make the process more accurate.

20 TIP: MIND THE GAP  Sometimes outcomes, particularly in areas where there has been little access to data in the past, can be surprising.  It can be helpful to examine what you have based your assumptions on, the sources of this information, and ways that you could gather further information to better understand student outcomes.  Startling numbers may not be evidence of data entry problems.

21 TIP: GO STRAIGHT TO THE SOURCE Foster youth who can clarify the nature of the problem or weigh in on a proposed program focus Internal stakeholders who are likely to affect actions you’d like to take External partners who can offer insights into both problems and potential solutions Whenever possible, run your assumptions by others, whether this be:

22 TIP: DON’T GET DISCOURAGED Sometimes the figures— especially regarding degree attainment—can be daunting. Remember to look at the bright spots and not just at the disappointing figures Don’t try to remedy everything—pick a discrete area of focus where you can focus your efforts Think about where you have an ability to make a change and get started there

23 TIP: MAKE A MAP Identify where you would need to focus your efforts –and with whom—to make the reality more like the ideal Draw what the ideal pathway might be like—starting from a successful outcome and including external partners Put the data points you have on these pathways First draw what those pathways might be like right now One way to get a handle on the information is to think about the pathways foster youth take through your institution:

24 TIP: MAKE DATA YOUR ALLY Think about ways you can use this information to be a stronger advocate for foster youth:  Show decision-makers the scale of the problem you want to solve  Use hard numbers to back up the stories you’ve been telling for years  Bring equity issues to the forefront by clarifying how outcomes differ by factors like socio-economic status, race, and gender

25 TIP: REMEMBER YOUR AREN’T ALONE Think about ways that data can help you build bridges : Who else would be motivated to take action by these numbers? Who else can help to improve outcomes? What issues might you have in common with these potential partners?

26 PLACES TO GET SUPPORT  Milestone & Momentum Points and How to Access Data Through CalPASS Plus: http://www.cacollegepathways.org/data-resourceshttp://www.cacollegepathways.org/data-resources  Getting to Good Data recorded webinar: http://www.cacollegepathways.org/training-material- files/?event_reference=486 http://www.cacollegepathways.org/training-material- files/?event_reference=486  Website with numerous tools on using data for decisions: http://datafordecisions.wested.org/ http://datafordecisions.wested.org/  Debbie Raucher, John Burton Foundation: debbie@johnburtonfoundation.org debbie@johnburtonfoundation.org All materials to be posted at: www.cacollegepathways.org www.cacollegepathways.org


Download ppt "MARCH 19, 2014 USING DATA TO INFORM PROGRAM DESIGN."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google