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School Improvement Grant (SIG) Intervention Models A webinar series prepared by the Center on Innovation & Improvement for use by the regional comprehensive.

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Presentation on theme: "School Improvement Grant (SIG) Intervention Models A webinar series prepared by the Center on Innovation & Improvement for use by the regional comprehensive."— Presentation transcript:

1 School Improvement Grant (SIG) Intervention Models A webinar series prepared by the Center on Innovation & Improvement for use by the regional comprehensive centers and state education agencies to inform local education agencies.

2 National Network of State School Improvement Leaders (NNSSIL) Mission To provide collegial support among state leaders of school improvement to build, utilize and disseminate a robust body of knowledge of professional practices leading to systemic educational change. Membership  50+ SEAs and territories  16 Regional Comprehensive Centers (RCCs)  CII & CCSSO as administrative partners For more information:

3 COMPREHENSIVE TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE CENTERS The U.S. Department of education supports a system of “comprehensive technical assistance centers” consisting of 16 regional centers and five national content centers. These centers provide technical assistance primarily to state education agencies, with the regional centers directly serving the states in their regions and the content centers providing expertise, materials, and tools to aid the regional centers in their work. NATIONAL CONTENT CENTERS Assessment and Accountability Comprehensive Center Center on Innovation & Improvement Center on Instruction National Comprehensive Center for Teacher Quality National High School Center For directory of the centers see: REGIONAL COMPREHENSIVE CENTERS  Alaska Comprehensive Center  Appalachia Region Comprehensive Center  California Comprehensive Center  Florida & Islands Comprehensive Center  Great Lakes East Comprehensive Center  Great Lakes West Region Comprehensive Center  The Mid-Atlantic Comprehensive Center  Mid-Continent Comprehensive Center  New England Comprehensive  New York Comprehensive  North Central Comprehensive Center  Northwest Regional Comprehensive  Pacific Comprehensive Center  Southeast Comprehensive  Southwest Comprehensive Center  Texas Comprehensive Center

4 Featured Presenter Lauren Morando Rhim Member, Scientific Council, Center on Innovation & Improvement and Education Consultant

5 THE TURNAROUND MODEL Lauren Morando Rhim LMR Consulting March 2010

6 WEBINAR OVERVIEW 3/5/2010Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers 6 Definition of the school turnaround modelTheory of actionStrategies to maximize positive impact of school turnaroundRole of state and district in turnaroundTimelinesPitfalls to avoidGuiding questionsKey resources

7 DEFINITION: SCHOOL CHANGE STRATEGIES 3/5/2010Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers 7 TurnaroundRestart ClosureTransformation

8 Teachers and Leaders Replace principal Use locally adopted “turnaround” competencies to review and select staff for school (rehire no more than 50% of existing staff) Implement strategies to recruit, place and retain staff Instructional and Support Strategies Select and implement an instructional model based on student needs Provide job- embedded PD designed to build capacity and support staff Ensure continuous use of data to inform and differentiate instruction Time and Support Provide increased learning time Staff and students Social-emotional and community- oriented services and supports Governance New governance structure Grant operating flexibility to school leader DEFINITION: TURNAROUND MODEL 3/5/2010Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers 8

9 THEORY OF ACTION 3/5/2010Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers 9 Existing configuration of leadership and instructional personnel has not created a learning environment in which students are succeeding… To dramatically change the environment for the benefit of the children currently enrolled in the school, the adults must change… Change entails literal change of personnel as well as behavioral change by the high capacity personnel that remain

10 STRATEGIES: KEY COMPONENTS 3/5/2010Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers 10 Leader Capability/ Competencies Leader Actions District governance/ environment Effective school practice Substantively improved outcomes Leader Capability/ Competencies Leader Actions District governance/ environment Effective school practice Substantively improved outcomes School Turnarounds: A Review of the Cross-Sector Evidence on Dramatic Organizational Improvement (2007).

11 STRATEGIES: HIRE BASED ON SPECIFIC ABILITIES 3/5/2010Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers 11 Turnaround leaders differ from standard organizational leaders Rare combination of: Successful principals in non-failing schools may not succeed as turnaround leader entrepreneur-style drive for results high influence competency inside and outside

12 STRATEGIES: SEEK TURNAROUND LEADERS WITH SPECIFIC COMPETENCIES Driving for Results – the turnaround leader’s strong desire to achieve outstanding results and the task-oriented actions required for success. Influencing for Results – motivating others and influencing their thinking and behavior to obtain results. Turnaround leaders cannot accomplish change alone, but instead must rely on the work of others. Problem Solving – including analysis of data to inform decisions; making clear, logical plans that people can follow; and ensuring a strong connection between school learning goals and classroom activity. Showing Confidence to Lead – staying visibly focused, committed, and self-assured despite the barrage of personal and professional attacks common during turnarounds. Source: Public Impact (2008). School Turnaround Leaders: Competencies for Success. 3/5/2010Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers 12

13 STRATEGIES: SUPPORT KEY LEADER ACTIONS Concentrate on EarlyVisibleMeaningful WINS 13 3/5/2010Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers

14 Deviate from Norms Break organization norms or rules to deploy new tactics needed for early wins Discard failed rules and routines when they inhibit success (e.g., “Cage busting”) STRATEGIES: SUPPORT KEY LEADER ACTIONS Cont. 14 3/5/2010Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers

15 STRATEGIES: SUPPORT KEY LEADER ACTIONS Cont. 1. Analyze and Problem Solve 2. Drive for Results 3. Influence Inside and Outside 4. Measure and Report 3/5/2010 Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers 15

16 Serve each of its Tier I schools, unless the LEA demonstrates that it lacks sufficient capacity or sufficient funds. Implement one of the four models in each Tier I and Tier II school the LEA has the capacity to serve. Provide adequate resources to each Tier I and Tier II school it commits to serve in order to implement fully one of the four school intervention models. Establish three-year student achievement goals in reading/language arts and mathematics and hold each Tier I, II and III school accountable annually for meeting, or being on track to meet, those goals. STRATEGIES: CREATE CONDITIONS FOR SUCCESS* * Adapted from presentation by Carlas McCauley, U.S. Department of Education for webinar series hosted by CII and CCSSO. January 28, /5/2010Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers 16

17 STRATEGIES: CREATE CONDITIONS FOR SUCCESS Develop intentional turnaround leader hiring practices Align systems to support rapid change and effective instructional practices Grant flexibility to act Prioritize teacher hiring and assignment in turnaround schools 17 3/5/2010 Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers

18 TURNAROUND LEADER RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION Practice intentional and targeted recruitment & selection of school leaders Recognize different schools require different leader skill sets Actively cultivate leadership pipeline Practice portfolio hiring to address goodness-of-fit (i.e., most likely won’t find one person with all the requisite skills) 3/5/2010 Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers 18

19 TURNAROUND LEADERS – WHO ARE THEY AND WHERE DO WE FIND THEM? Cultivate pipelines and recruit inside and outside districtsDifferentiate using competency-based hiring practices Consider traditional and alternative routes (e.g., business or military) Blend experienced and inexperienced Ensure that in aggregate the leadership team has a strong background in effective instructional practices 3/5/2010 Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers 19

20 STRATEGIES: LEVERAGE FOCUSED STAFF DISMISSALS 3/5/2010Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers 20 Reinforce positive work habits, commit not to tolerate negative work habits Boost employee morale by acknowledging success and addressing underperformance Recruiting: failure to dismiss low-performing teachers impedes recruitment of high performing teachers Source: Performance-Based Dismissals (2009) Center on Innovation & Improvement

21 STRATEGIES: STATE AND DISTRICT ROLE IN FOCUSED STAFF DISMISSALS 3/5/2010Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers 21 Negotiate Expedited Processes for Performance-Based Dismissals in Turnaround Schools Enable Greater Flexibility Over Class Sizes and Classroom Assignments Prioritize Recruitment, Hiring, and Placement for Turnaround Schools Assemble “Swat” or Intervention Teams in the State Department or District Offices to Support School Leaders with Dismissal Procedures Source: Performance-Based Dismissals (2009) Center on Innovation & Improvement

22 STRATEGIES: STAFF DISMISSAL PROCESS 3/5/2010Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers 22 Communicate a VisionGather and Analyze a Variety of DataConduct Targeted EvaluationsExamine Performance ImprovementsAccess District Support Source: Performance-Based Dismissals (2009) Center on Innovation & Improvement

23 STRATEGIES: STATE ROLE IN TURNAROUND 3/5/2010Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers 23 Remove state regulatory obstacles that hinder changeBuild system technical capacityCommunicate sense of urgency and instill “reform press” Ensure high-capacity school leaders have power to manage staff, funding, and time to get results Create state turnaround office to provide direct and indirect support to schools identified for turnaround

24 STRATEGIES: DISTRICT ROLE IN A TURNAROUND Develop intentional turnaround leader hiring practicesAlign systems to support rapid changeGrant freedom to act Prioritize teacher hiring and assignment in turnaround schools 3/5/2010Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers 24

25 Feb ’10 Feb 2010 SEAs’ SIG applications due to ED ED awards SIG grants to States March-April ’10 LEA application process May ’10 SEA awards grants to LEAs LEAs begin implementation Fall ’10 SIG schools open/reopen SIG TIMELINE 25 3/5/2010Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers

26 T URNAROUND T IMELINE 26 3/5/2010Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers March-April ’10 LEA application process Identify turnaround schools Initiate recruitment campaign to recruit principal and teachers to work in turnaround school Organize special recruiting events Develop competency based hiring processes May ’10 SEA awards grants to LEAs LEAs begin implementation Hire highly capable turnaround leader Prioritize hiring for turnaround schools Develop campaign to inform community of intervention models Analyze data to develop school turnaround plan June ’10 Develop plan to maximize key school assets: time, people, and resources Codify turnaround leadership team Identify and provide key operating flexibility to school leader July ’10 Develop specific action plan with designated early wins and changes to standard operating procedures Provide professional development to instructional personnel August ’10 Analyze student data to inform instructional practice beginning day 1 Plan school-year kick-off event Initiate turnaround campaign to communicate drive for results Fall ’10 + SIG schools open Initiate early wins Provide ongoing job-embedded professional development Provide social- emotional and community oriented services and supports Monitor progress, anticipate mid- course corrections Prepare for some efforts to fail and initiate rapid “retry”

27 PITFALLS TO AVOID 3/5/2010Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers 27 Failing to intentionally cultivate a supply of leaders and operators to fix failing schools Selecting the most readily available rather than BEST leader to lead turnaround/transformation effort Permitting staff to avoid change Demonstrating lack of political will to pursue difficult strategies, including rapid “retry” Recycling underperforming teachers Allowing state and district policies and standard operating procedures to inhibit dramatic change

28 GUIDING QUESTIONS 3/5/2010Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers 28  What role will the district take to actively prioritize and support turnaround of the low-achieving school?  How will you recruit and select a skilled turnaround leader?  What policies need to change to prioritize teacher recruitment and hiring for schools engaged in a turnaround effort?  What state and district policies and standard operating procedures impede turnaround efforts?  How will you track implementation of effective instructional practices as an early indicator of progress?

29 RESOURCES 3/5/2010Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers 29 Brinson, D., & Rhim, L. (2009). Breaking the habit of low performance. Lincoln, IL: Center on Innovation & Improvement. Retrieved from Brinson, D., Kowal, J., & Hassel, B. (with Rhim, L., & Valsing, E.). (2008). School turnarounds: actions and results. Lincoln, IL: Public Impact, Academic Development Institute. Retrieved from The Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement. (2009). School restructuring: What works when? A guide for education leaders. Washington, DC: Learning Points Associates. Retrieved from Herman, R., Dawson, P., Dee, T., Greene, J., Maynard, R., Redding, S., & Darwin, M. (2008). Turning around chronically low-performing schools: A practice guide. (NCEE # ). Washington, DC: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. Retrieved from Hess, F. H. (2010). Cages of their own design: Five strategies to help education leaders break free. Washington, DC: American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research. Retrieved from

30 RESOURCES 3/5/2010Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers 30 Kowal, J., Hassel, E. A., & Hassel, B. C. (2009). Successful school turnarounds: Seven steps for district leaders. Washington, DC: The Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement. Issue brief retrieved from Webcast retrieved from: turnarounds/http://www.centerforcsri.org/webcasts/school- turnarounds/ Lane, B. (2009). Exploring the pathway to rapid district improvement. Lincoln, IL: Center on Innovation and Improvement. Retrieved from New Leaders for New Schools. (2009, October) Principal effectiveness: A new principalship to drive student achievement, teacher effectiveness, and school turnarounds. NY: Author. Retrieved from The New Teacher Project. (2009, December ). Human capital reform in Cincinnati public schools: Strengthening teacher effectiveness and support. Brooklyn, NY: Author. Retrieved from Perlman, C. L., & Redding, S. (Eds). (2010). Handbook on effective implementation of school improvement grants. Lincoln, IL: Center on Innovation & Improvement. Retrieved from Public Impact. (2007). School turnarounds: A review of the cross-sector evidence on dramatic organizational improvement. Lincoln, IL: Public Impact, Academic Development Institute. Retrieved from

31 RESOURCES 3/5/2010Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers 31 Public Impact. (2008). School turnaround leaders: Competencies for success. Chapel Hill, NC: Author. Retrieved from schools-fail/competencies-for-turnaround-successhttp://www.publicimpact.com/act-strategically-when- schools-fail/competencies-for-turnaround-success Public Impact. (2009, August). Try, try, again: How to triple the number of fixed failing schools without getting any better at fixing schools. [PowerPoint presentation]. Chapel Hill, NC: Author. Retrieved from Redding, S. (2010). Selecting the intervention model and partners. Lincoln, IL: Center on Innovation & Improvement. Retrieved from Redding, S., & Walberg, H. (Eds.). (2008). Handbook on statewide systems of support. Lincoln, IL: Center on Innovation & Improvement. Retrieved from Steiner, L. (2009). Performance-based dismissals: cross-sector lessons for school turnarounds. Lincoln, IL: Center on Innovation & Improvement. Retrieved from Walberg, H. J. (Ed.). (2007). Handbook on restructuring and substantial school improvement. Lincoln, IL: Center on Innovation and Improvement. Retrieved from

32 FURTHER QUESTIONS…. Webinar citation: Center on Innovation & Improvement (Writer, Producer), & Council of Chief State School Officers (Producer). (2010, March). School Improvement Grant (SIG) intervention models: The turnaround model. [audiovisual recording]. Prepared for the National Network of State School Improvement Leaders. Lincoln, IL: Center on Innovation & Improvement. Retrieved from 3/5/2010Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers 32


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