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PROVING YOUR WORTH: GATHERING EVIDENCE IN YOUR SCHOOL LIBRARY Sandra Hughes-Hassell, Ph.D. School of Information & Library Science, UNC Debbie Dupree,

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Presentation on theme: "PROVING YOUR WORTH: GATHERING EVIDENCE IN YOUR SCHOOL LIBRARY Sandra Hughes-Hassell, Ph.D. School of Information & Library Science, UNC Debbie Dupree,"— Presentation transcript:

1 PROVING YOUR WORTH: GATHERING EVIDENCE IN YOUR SCHOOL LIBRARY Sandra Hughes-Hassell, Ph.D. School of Information & Library Science, UNC Debbie Dupree, MLS, NBCT Salem Middle School, Wake County Kristen Ziller, MLS, NBCT Durant Road Middle School, Wake County

2 Essential Questions 1. Why should school librarians worry about proving their worth? 2. What types of data can school librarians gather to demonstrate the tangible learning outcomes and learning benefits of their school library program? 3. How can school librarians use that data to inform their decisions? 4. How can school librarians share that data with key stakeholders? 2 NCSLMA November 4, 2010

3 Why should school librarians worry about proving their worth? 3 NCSLMA November 4, 2010

4 Today’s Economic Environment  A Nation Without School Libraries A Nation Without School Libraries 4 NCSLMA November 4, 2010

5 From the Research…. “Many, especially parents and students, Do Not see librarians as educated professionals who play an active role in the academic community.” From: “A Report of Findings From Six Focus Groups with K-12 Parents, Teachers, and Principals, as Well as Middle and High School Students” (AASL, 2003) 5 NCSLMA November 4, 2010

6 From the Research…. “Parents... tend to rely on their own image of school libraries and librarians from their youth. “When asked what they see as the value of school librarians for their children today, several immediately respond, “Nothing!” These parents see their children utilizing resources outside the school library more frequently and efficiently.” From: “A Report of Findings From Six Focus Groups with K-12 Parents, Teachers, and Principals, as Well as Middle and High School Students” (AASL, 2003) 6 NCSLMA November 4, 2010

7 From the Research…. “ Perceived value of the school library and librarian is lower for middle and high school students than for elementary students – particularly among parents and students.” From: “A Report of Findings From Six Focus Groups with K-12 Parents, Teachers, and Principals, as Well as Middle and High School Students” (AASL, 2003) 7 NCSLMA November 4, 2010

8 From the Research…. “ High school students tend to associate the library with mostly negative thoughts: a nagging/yelling librarian, absolute silence required, an irritating need to show their ID in order to use the school library, and restricted Internet access and checkout limits.” From: “A Report of Findings From Six Focus Groups with K-12 Parents, Teachers, and Principals, as Well as Middle and High School Students” (AASL, 2003) 8 NCSLMA November 4, 2010

9 From the Research….  Survey by SLJ of principals (Lau, 2002)  Only 47% believe there is direct link between effective libraries and increased student achievement.  Only 41% said libraries have positive effect on students’ standardized test scores. 9 NCSLMA November 4, 2010

10 “Librarians have done everything so right that they have made themselves invisible.” (Wallace and Van Fleet, 1994) From the Research…. 10 NCSLMA November 4, 2010

11 What types of data can school librarians gather to demonstrate the tangible learning outcomes and learning benefits of their school library program? How can school librarians use data to inform their decisions? 11 NCSLMA November 4, 2010

12 Using Data to Inform Instruction  Online Database Statistics  SSR Survey ~ Teachers and Students  End-of-Project Debriefing with Teachers  Citation Analysis/Bibliometrics  Entrance/Exit Tickets  Reflection Journals NCSLMA November 4, 2010 12

13 Project Reflections NCSLMA November 4, 2010 13  Understand student struggles  Target individual needs  Revise instruction  Identify reteaching opportunities  Provide opportunities for teacher conversations

14 Entrance Ticket ~ Pre-Project NCSLMA November 4, 2010 14

15 Entrance Ticket ~ Beginning of Project NCSLMA November 4, 2010 15

16 Entrance Ticket ~ During Project NCSLMA November 4, 2010 16

17 Reflections on Literature NCSLMA November 4, 2010 17

18 Using Data to Increase Student Achievement  Student EOG Data NCSLMA November 4, 2010 18

19 19 NCSLMA November 4, 2010

20 EOG Informational Reading by Homeroom NCSLMA November 4, 2010 20

21 Average Circulation by Homeroom NCSLMA November 4, 2010 21 Homeroom# StudentsCirc - monthThis yearAverage Zel 3237633414.5 Swa 1239832314.0 Cou 13116659319.12 M. Han 21716656233.05 Mol 33513042412.11 Man 12321665728.56 Ken 33216954717.09 Hut 4306837612.53 L. Han 234102336.8 Fer 4294532811.31 Che 13021968622.86 Bea 4295134812.0 Bar 4287357620.57

22 Using Data to Highlight a Need for Funding  SSR Survey Data  Database Usage Data  Tracking Time  Student Circulation Numbers  Student Survey Data to Determine Purchasing Decisions NCSLMA November 4, 2010 22

23 Using Data to Track Your Time  Tally Sheet at Circulation Desk  Media Center Sign-up Book Indicating Work with classes  Time Spent doing “non media specialist” duties  Record of your media specialist duties left “undone” NCSLMA November 4, 2010 23

24 Tracking Student Circulation Numbers NCSLMA November 4, 2010 24

25 Using Data to Develop Services  Student Sign-in Data  Student Interest Surveys  Circulation Data NCSLMA November 4, 2010 25

26 Student Sign-in Data NCSLMA November 4, 2010 26

27 Student Interest Surveys NCSLMA November 4, 2010 27  Give students a voice in program decision-making  Feedback on what’s working and what’s not  Interests in and out of school ~ correlate with reading materials

28 Student Feedback on Programs NCSLMA November 4, 2010 28  Poll “Likes” and “Dislikes”  Involve Students in Decision-Making  Be Spontaneous

29 Student Book Selection NCSLMA November 4, 2010 29

30 Student Interests NCSLMA November 4, 2010 30

31 Open-Ended Responses NCSLMA November 4, 2010 31

32 Using Data to Build Collaborative Partnerships  PLT Meeting Attendance  Track Partnerships with Teachers  Media Center Services Survey NCSLMA November 4, 2010 32

33 Tracking Collaboration NCSLMA November 4, 2010 33

34 A Cumulative Record NCSLMA November 4, 2010 34

35 Teacher Surveys NCSLMA November 4, 2010 35

36 Tools You Can Use To Gather Data  Online Survey Tools (Zoomerang, Google Surveys)  Post-it notes  Stickers  Reflection Parking Lot  Plus/Delta NCSLMA November 4, 2010 36

37 Questions for the Audience…  What kind(s) of data are you currently gathering?  What tools are you using?  How are you using that data to inform your decisions? 37 NCSLMA November 4, 2010

38 How can school librarians share that data with key stakeholders? 38 NCSLMA November 4, 2010

39 Teachers/Administrators  Data Wall 39 NCSLMA November 4, 2010

40 Teachers/Administrators  PLC Meetings  Faculty Meetings  Department Meetings

41 Parents  Contribute to the PTO/PTA newsletter EVERYTIME it comes out!  Attend PTO/PTA meetings—ask for 5 minutes (Create a video or Prezi that is running as people enter the meeting room)  Create a newsletter for parents (Think about making it available in multiple formats)  Create your own Hillside Middle School (Utah) Hillside Middle School  OR use this one–it’s FREE! School Library LinkSchool Library Link 41 NCSLMA November 4, 2010

42 Everyone–Social Media  Facebook  Brentwood School Library Brentwood School Library  Bell Elementary School Libary Bell Elementary School Libary  Twitter  UniHighLibrary on Twitter UniHighLibrary on Twitter  Library Website  Include photos, videos, glogs, etc. (Unquiet Library)Unquiet Library  Library Blog  Gargolyes Loose in the Library (Frances Jacobson Harris) Gargolyes Loose in the Library NCSLMA November 4, 2010 42

43 Everyone–Annual Reports  School Library Annual Reports (wiki) School Library Annual Reports (wiki)  Susan Landis Eley: Hillside Elementary School (NJ) (Print)Hillside Elementary School  Buffy Hamilton: The Unquiet Library (GA) Slideshare) Buffy Hamilton: The Unquiet Library  Joyce Valenza: Springfield Township High School (PA) (video) Joyce Valenza: Springfield Township NCSLMA November 4, 2010 43

44 Annual Reports from Durant and Salem NCSLMA November 4, 2010 44 Salem Middle School Library Media Annual Report

45 Tools You Can Use to Share Data  Photos  An Active Media Center Website  Web 2.0 Tools—Blogs, wikis, twitter, Facebook, glogster, wallwisher, etc. TELL STORIES!! PUT DATA IN CONTEXT!! NCSLMA November 4, 2010 45

46 Question for the Audience…  How are you sharing data with your stakeholders?  What mechanisms are you using? 46 NCSLMA November 4, 2010

47 Action Plan  What are 3 things you will do to prove your worth? NCSLMA November 4, 2010 47

48 Additional Resources  WebJunction: Demonstrating Impact WebJunction: Demonstrating Impact  Everyday Advocacy: Making a Case for Libraries is easy with Web Tools (SLJ, August 2010) Everyday Advocacy: Making a Case for Libraries is easy with Web Tools  SaveLibraries.org SaveLibraries.org  Igniting a Passion for Reading by Dr. Steven Layne  Knowledge Quest: Evidence-based Practice, vol. 37, no. 2. Nov./Dec. 2008  Output Measures for School Library Media Programs by Frances Bryant Bradburn.  Toward a 21 st Century Media Program, edited by Esther Rosenfeld


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