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HOW NON-PROFITS CAN LEVERAGE MODELS OF BEHAVIOR CHANGE TO CHANGE THE WORLD Better Behaviors for a Better World Ben Malakoff – Georgetown University - Cause.

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Presentation on theme: "HOW NON-PROFITS CAN LEVERAGE MODELS OF BEHAVIOR CHANGE TO CHANGE THE WORLD Better Behaviors for a Better World Ben Malakoff – Georgetown University - Cause."— Presentation transcript:

1 HOW NON-PROFITS CAN LEVERAGE MODELS OF BEHAVIOR CHANGE TO CHANGE THE WORLD Better Behaviors for a Better World Ben Malakoff – Georgetown University - Cause Consulting – Fall 2013

2 Agenda Learning Objectives Why Behavior Change? Behavior Change 101 COM-B Theory Real World Applications Conclusion

3 Objectives Gain an understanding of the different models of behavior change Gain an understanding of how to apply the principals of these models to accomplishing the missions of nonprofits

4 Why Behavior Change?

5 Behavior Change 101

6 The Many Models Transtheoretical (TTM)/Stages of Change Social Ecological Mode Health Belief Model Choice Architecture Theory of Planned Behavior Theory of Reasoned Action Social Learning/Social Cognitive Health Action Process Approach And more...

7 The Many Models Transtheoretical (TTM)/Stages of Change Social Ecological Model Health Belief Model Choice Architecture Theory of Planned Behavior Theory of Reasoned Action Social Learning/Social Cognitive Health Action Process Approach And more...

8 TTM/Stages of Change

9 Social Ecological Model

10 Health Belief Model

11 Choice Architecture a.k.a. Nudge Theory We are predictably irrational creatures Paternal Libertarianism

12 COM-B Theory: One model to rule them all?

13 COM-B Theory

14 Select Specify Understand Target Behavior

15 COM-B Theory Select Specify Understand Intervention Functions BCTs Target Behavior Design Intervention

16 Intervention Functions

17 Behavior Change Techniques (BCTs) General Information Inform of consequences Social norming Intention formation Barrier identification Provide encouragement Set graded tasks Instruct Demonstrate Social comparison Self talk Stress management Motivational interviewing Set goals Review goals Self-monitoring Provide feedback Reward Prompts/cues Behavioral contracts Practice Follow-up Social support Role model Relapse prevention Time Management

18 COM-B Theory Select Specify Understand Intervention Functions BCTs Mode Of Delivery Policy Categories Target Behavior Design Intervention Deliver Intervention

19 Policy Categories

20 The Behavior Change Wheel

21 Putting Theory into Practice

22 Be Active/Gym for Free Campaign Problem: Low levels of physical activity contributing to poor health and childhood obesity. Goal: Increase rates of physical activity.

23 Be Active/Gym for Free Campaign Capability:: Provide free access to the city’s civic recreation facilities Motivation: Had to go to a recreation facility at least 4x a month to maintain free access Opportunity: Not just gym access, but other activities including tai chi, mother/child activities, and family sports sessions

24 Be Active/Gym for Free Campaign Intervention functions:  Enablement  Incentivisation  Education BCTs:  Inform of consequences  Behavioral contracts  Set goals  Social norming Policy Categories:  Fiscal measures  Communications/Marketing  Service provision

25 Be Active/Gym for Free Campaign 90 regular gym users to 6,555 in seven months  300,000 participants in two years  74% had not previously been members of recreation centers Increased demand for weight loss and smoking cessation programs

26 Closing Thoughts No one theory is perfect Large scale behavior change takes a long time Incorporating different components of each model maximizes chances for success

27 Sources Glanz (n.d.) Social and behavioral theories. Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research. nts/public/glanz_fullchapter.pdf Kotler and Lee (2011) Social Marketing: Influencing behaviors for good, 4 th Ed. Michie et al (2011) The Behaviour Change Wheel: a new method for characterising and designing behaviour change interventions, Implementation Science. Thaler and Sunsteing (2009) Nudge: Improving decisions about wealth, health, and happiness.

28 Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch Program Problem: Human consumption of seafood has caused overfishing which is destabilizing the ocean environments. Goal: Increase consumption of sustainable seafood, and ultimately put pressure on suppliers and retailers to alter their sourcing practices

29 Opportunity: Inform consumers of sustainable and unsustainable seafood choices at the point of purchase. Motivation: Highlight the health risks of eating certain kinds of seafood. Capability: Provide easy ways for consumers to quickly determine what seafoods are sustainably harvested and healthy wherever they may be. Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch Program

30 Intervention Functions:  Education  Enablement  Persuasion BCTs:  General information  Inform of consequences  Instruct Policy Categories:  Communications/marketing  Guidelines  Service provision Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch Program

31 34 million guides distributed 161 partnerships Major retailers stopped selling overfished species Two of the largest food service companies in the US made sustainable seafood commitments Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch Program


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