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Write to Inform. Topic: Write a report about a species of plant or animal imported into the United States that has resulted in ecological or economic.

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Presentation on theme: "Write to Inform. Topic: Write a report about a species of plant or animal imported into the United States that has resulted in ecological or economic."— Presentation transcript:

1 Write to Inform

2 Topic: Write a report about a species of plant or animal imported into the United States that has resulted in ecological or economic problems.

3 Brainstorm Ideas for Writing Imported Plants and Animals Fire ants Kudzu Africanized bees “killer bees” Asian Carp Multiflora Rose

4 Consider Possible Categories for the Report Describe it Kudzu How it came to the U.S. Why it is a problem What is being done about it Where it grows Does it have any advantages

5 Combine & Select Categories Kudzu How it came to the U.S. Why it is a problem What is being done about it Where it grows Describe itDoes it have any advantages

6 Put combined and selected categories from the tree map in a flow map. Description Origin/location in US/problems Efforts to eliminate/advantages There is a wild monster on the loose! It grows fast and travels wherever it wants to go, gobbling up everything that is in it’s way! Creepy green monsters really do live in the Southern United States, according to some eyewitnesses. You can see them towering beside the highways. Some look like huge apes. Others look like camels or giraffes. Some even look like the giant, green Godzilla ready to take over the whole world.

7 Description Origin/location in US/problems Efforts to eliminate/advantages There is a wild monster on the loose! It grows fast and travels wherever it wants to go, gobbling up everything that is in it’s way! Creepy green monsters really do live in the Southern United States, according to some eyewitnesses. You can see them towering beside the highways. Some look like huge apes. Others look like camels or giraffes. Some even look like the giant, green Godzilla ready to take over the whole world. Hairy vine, legume family Grows in tidy rows Has purple flowers Grows at incredible speed Can cover a very tall tree Looks like a monster Frigid weather slows growth From Japan to grow in gardens US government gave seedlings and planted it along the roads Grew out of control in humid southeastern US Caused frustration and financial problems to individuals, municipalities and companies Plant it on top of buildings for cooling in the summer Tap like maple trees Changed into a kind of fuel Used by Japanese and Chinese people Eradication is the goal but proven to be costly goals being used in NC as more effective method

8 Description Origin/location in US/problems Efforts to eliminate/advantages There is a wild monster on the loose! It grows fast and travels wherever it wants to go, gobbling up everything that is in it’s way! Creepy green monsters really do live in the Southern United States, according to some eyewitnesses. You can see them towering beside the highways. Some look like huge apes. Others look like camels or giraffes. Some even look like the giant, green Godzilla ready to take over the whole world. Hairy vine, legume family Grows in tidy rows Has purple flowers Grows at incredible speed Can cover a very tall tree Looks like a monster Frigid weather slows growth From Japan to grow in gardens US government gave seedlings and planted it along the roads Grew out of control in humid southeastern US Caused frustration and financial problems to individuals, municipalities and companies Plant it on top of buildings for cooling in the summer Tap like maple trees Changed into a kind of fuel Used by Japanese and Chinese people Eradication is the goal but proven to be costly goals being used in NC as more effective method While there have been some progressive investigations regarding the beneficial uses of this vine that grows with Olympic speed, the fact remains that the negatives continue to outweigh the positives. Only time will tell if or when this will change.

9 Description Origin/location in US/problems Efforts to eliminate/advantages There is a wild monster on the loose! It grows fast and travels wherever it wants to go, gobbling up everything that is in it’s way! Creepy green monsters really do live in the Southern United States, according to some eyewitnesses. You can see them towering beside the highways. Some look like huge apes. Others look like camels or giraffes. Some even look like the giant, green Godzilla ready to take over the whole world. Hairy vine, legume family Grows in tidy rows Has purple flowers Grows at incredible speed Can cover a very tall tree Looks like a monster Frigid weather slows growth From Japan to grow in gardens US government gave seedlings and planted it along the roads Grew out of control in humid southeastern US Caused frustration and financial problems to individuals, municipalities and companies Plant it on top of buildings for cooling in the summer Tap like maple trees Changed into a kind of fuel Used by Japanese and Chinese people Eradication is the goal but proven to be costly goals being used in NC as more effective method While there have been some progressive investigations regarding the beneficial uses of this vine that grows with Olympic speed, the fact remains that the negatives continue to outweigh the positives. Only time will tell if or when this will change.

10 There is a wild monster on the loose! It grows fast and travels wherever it wants to go, gobbling up everything in its way! Creepy green monsters really do live in the southern United States, according to some eyewitnesses. You can see them towering beside the highways. Some look like huge apes. Others look like camels or giraffes. Some even look like the big giant green Godzilla ready to take over the whole world. Kudzu is a hairy vine that is in the legume family with peas, peanuts, and soybeans. It grows in tidy rows, so it looks like it is “civilized” or deliberately planted by someone; however, this is not the case at all. In the spring, the vine has purple flowers that have a scent like grape soda. On the right is a picture of the kudzu vine blossoming in the spring. Kudzu is actually a wild plant that travels wherever it wants to go at an incredible speed. One single vine can grow a foot in just twenty-four hours. In addition to this, one single plant can grow large enough to cover a very tall tree. When the kudzu gets to the top of the tree, the vines hang down the sides and the tree takes on the shape of a strange green monster. (See the illustration on the left.) The only thing that appears to impede the growth of kudzu is frigid weather.

11 Kudzu was first imported into the United States from Japan more than 100 years ago as a beautiful plant to grow in gardens. Then scientists discovered that it could do an important job. Its big roots could hold soil in place, keeping down erosion. After this important discovery, the U.S. Government gave away millions of kudzu seedlings and also paid people to plant it along roads from Maryland to Texas. At first, kudzu seemed like a miracle plant. It did keep the soil from washing away; but then it started growing all over forests and highways. It grew out of control, particularly in the humid southeastern part of the United States. After a while it seemed to “consume” everything it came across, causing frustration and financial problems to individuals, municipalities, and companies. For example, telephone companies had to deal with the vine becoming so heavy that it damaged the wires or made the poles fall to the ground. Also, railroad engineers became frustrated as they had to skid and slide up a hill on tracks enclosed with kudzu. In addition, small towns and cities had to deal with the removal of this pesky plant that overtook its parks and recreation areas. Even worse, people who grew trees for a living suffered financial loss as kudzu suffocated and destroyed their crop.

12 As kudzu problems continued to escalate and cause major concerns, people in the United States tried to come up with ways to make the green stuff both useful and profitable. One scientist thought he could plant it on top of buildings so that it would hang down the sides and keep the building cool in the summer. Another scientist thought that, since kudzu vines have sugar in them, they could be tapped like maple trees. Another person demonstrated how kudzu vines could be changed into a kind of fuel. People from Japan and China also had ideas. For hundreds of years the Japanese people have gotten medicine, paper, and cloth from kudzu. Thus far they have not made a pair of jeans out of kudzu; however, the kudzu root is for sale in some grocery stores to be ground up and used like cornstarch for cooking. In addition, scientists in China have found chemicals in kudzu that help people with heart problems. Unfortunately, all of these ideas have not yet provided any relief to those areas of the United States that face the day-to-day challenge of dealing with this hairy green super plant that continues to consume at record speeds. Eradication is the goal as scientists continue their studies; however, this has proven to be costly. Recently, farmers have discovered that cows enjoy kudzu, so they have been allowed to feed on the plant. One small town in North Carolina is renting goats to help with its kudzu problem. While studying the problem, the town’s city manager discovered that using mechanical meant to destroy the kudzu would cost about $28, per acre. On the other hand, bringing in 50 goats and installing an electric fence to keep them contained would cost $2, per acre. The goats would need to be brought in at least once for follow-up control. Other cities in the state are waiting for the results of the project before determining if this is a viable option for their areas. While there have been some progressive investigations regarding the benefits of this vine that grow with Olympic speed, the fact remains that the negatives continue to outweigh the positives. Only time will tell if or when this might change.

13 The Green Godzilla There is a wild monster on the loose! It grows fast and travels wherever it wants to go, gobbling up everything in its way! Creepy green monsters really do live in the southern United States, according to some eyewitnesses. You can see them towering beside the highways. Some look like huge apes. Others look like camels or giraffes. Some even look like the big giant green Godzilla* ready to take over the whole world. The Purple Olympic Runner Kudzu is a hairy vine that is in the legume family with peas, peanuts, and soybeans. It grows in tidy rows, so it looks like it is “civilized” or deliberately planted by someone; however, this is not the case at all. In the spring, the vine has purple flowers that have a scent like grape soda. On the right is a picture of the kudzu vine blossoming in the spring. Kudzu is actually a wild plant that travels wherever it wants to go at an incredible speed. One single vine can grow a foot in just twenty-four hours. In addition to this, one single plant can grow large enough to cover a very tall tree. When the kudzu gets to the top of the tree, the vines hang down the sides and the tree takes on the shape of a strange green monster. (See the illustration on the left.) The only thing that appears to impede the growth of kudzu is frigid weather.

14 A Good Idea Turns Bad Kudzu was first imported into the United States from Japan more than 100 years ago as a beautiful plant to grow in gardens. Then scientists discovered that it could do an important job. Its big roots could hold soil in place, keeping down erosion. After this important discovery, the U.S. Government gave away millions of kudzu seedlings and also paid people to plant it along roads from Maryland to Texas. At first, kudzu seemed like a miracle plant. It did keep the soil from washing away; but then it started growing all over forests and highways. It grew out of control, particularly in the humid southeastern part of the United States. After a while it seemed to “consume” everything it came across, causing frustration and financial problems to individuals, municipalities, and companies. For example, telephone companies had to deal with the vine becoming so heavy that it damaged the wires or made the poles fall to the ground. Also, railroad engineers became frustrated as they had to skid and slide up a hill on tracks enclosed with kudzu. In addition, small towns and cities had to deal with the removal of this pesky plant that overtook its parks and recreation areas. Even worse, people who grew trees for a living suffered financial loss as kudzu suffocated and destroyed their crop.

15 Tackling the Problem As kudzu problems continued to escalate and cause major concerns, people in the United States tried to come up with ways to make the green stuff both useful and profitable. One scientist thought he could plant it on top of buildings so that it would hang down the sides and keep the building cool in the summer. Another scientist thought that, since kudzu vines have sugar in them, they could be tapped like maple trees. Another person demonstrated how kudzu vines could be changed into a kind of fuel. People from Japan and China also had ideas. For hundreds of years the Japanese people have gotten medicine, paper, and cloth from kudzu. Thus far they have not made a pair of jeans out of kudzu; however, the kudzu root is for sale in some grocery stores to be ground up and used like cornstarch for cooking. In addition, scientists in China have found chemicals in kudzu that help people with heart problems. Unfortunately, all of these ideas have not yet provided any relief to those areas of the United States that face the day-to-day challenge of dealing with this hairy green super plant that continues to consume at record speeds. Eradication is the goal as scientists continue their studies; however, this has proven to be costly. Recently, farmers have discovered that cows enjoy kudzu, so they have been allowed to feed on the plant. One small town in North Carolina is renting goats to help with its kudzu problem. While studying the problem, the town’s city manager discovered that using mechanical meant to destroy the kudzu would cost about $28, per acre. On the other hand, bringing in 50 goats and installing an electric fence to keep them contained would cost $2, per acre. The goats would need to be brought in at least once for follow-up control. Other cities in the state are waiting for the results of the project before determining if this is a viable option for their areas. While there have been some progressive investigations regarding the benefits of this vine that grow with Olympic speed, the fact remains that the negatives continue to outweigh the positives. Only time will tell if or when this might change. *Godzilla is the large, terrifying, green reptile that was the star of a series of popular horror films.


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