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THE SKILLFUL TEACHER Stephen Brookfield Distinguished University Professor University of St. Thomas Minneapolis-St. Paul Stephen Brookfield Distinguished.

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Presentation on theme: "THE SKILLFUL TEACHER Stephen Brookfield Distinguished University Professor University of St. Thomas Minneapolis-St. Paul Stephen Brookfield Distinguished."— Presentation transcript:

1 THE SKILLFUL TEACHER Stephen Brookfield Distinguished University Professor University of St. Thomas Minneapolis-St. Paul Stephen Brookfield Distinguished University Professor University of St. Thomas Minneapolis-St. Paul

2 ASSUMPTIONS OF SKILLFUL TEACHING Good teaching = whatever helps students learn Best teaching is critically reflective Most important teaching knowledge we need: how students experience learning

3 CRITICAL INCIDENT QUESTIONNAIRE (CIQ) Moment Most Engaged as a Learner Moment Most Distanced as a Learner Action Most Affirming/Helpful Action Most Puzzling/Confusing What Surprised You Most Moment Most Engaged as a Learner Moment Most Distanced as a Learner Action Most Affirming/Helpful Action Most Puzzling/Confusing What Surprised You Most

4 HOW TO USE THE CIQ / Last 5 minutes of last class / Anonymous / Reviewed at beginning of next weeks class / Illustrates diversity in class / Allows you to emphasize why class is organized as it is / Negotiation is NOT capitulation / Last 5 minutes of last class / Anonymous / Reviewed at beginning of next weeks class / Illustrates diversity in class / Allows you to emphasize why class is organized as it is / Negotiation is NOT capitulation

5 BENEFITS OF CIQ Helps you take informed actions Builds a case for using multiple methods and techniques with students Allows you to catch problems, confusions & misunderstandings early Builds trust Models Critical Thinking

6 WHAT STUDENTS VALUE IN TEACHERS CREDIBILITY Expertise (you really know your stuff) Experience (as a real life worker & as a teacher) Rationale (you have a thought through plan of action) Conviction (that the learning is important) CREDIBILITY Expertise (you really know your stuff) Experience (as a real life worker & as a teacher) Rationale (you have a thought through plan of action) Conviction (that the learning is important)

7 AUTHENTICITY FCongruence (between your words & actions) FFull Disclosure (of your expectations & criteria) FResponsiveness (to students learning difficulties) FPersonhood (appropriate autobiographical examples) FCongruence (between your words & actions) FFull Disclosure (of your expectations & criteria) FResponsiveness (to students learning difficulties) FPersonhood (appropriate autobiographical examples)

8 EMOTIONAL RHYTHMS IMPOSTORSHIP CULTURAL SUICIDE LOST INNOCENCE ROADRUNNING

9 WHY LECTURE? RProvide overview/outline of a broad body of material RTo explain and illustrate with examples difficult ideas & concepts RTo introduce alternative perspectives & interpretations RTo model intellectual attitudes and behaviors RTo encourage learners interest in a topic RProvide overview/outline of a broad body of material RTo explain and illustrate with examples difficult ideas & concepts RTo introduce alternative perspectives & interpretations RTo model intellectual attitudes and behaviors RTo encourage learners interest in a topic

10 USE A VARIETY OF APPROACHES Chunked in 15 minute segments Structured Silent writing (3 minutes) - most important/confusing point, question / illustration of concept. Shuffle these & ask students to read them or read them yourself. Buzz groups Lecture from Siberia Assign Roles to Students each week - summarizer, devils advocate Team lecturing with peer critique

11 VARIETY OF APPROACHES Video clips Spot the deliberate teacher error (when you contradict yourself, say something clearly inaccurate etc.) Example inventories - students provide examples to show theyve understood concepts youve covered (on 3x5, newsprint, blackboard on online)

12 ORGANIZED AS HELPFUL INFORMATIONAL MAPS Scaffolding Notes - Main headings & sub-headings with space for examples Clear verbal signals - global (now a whole new area is being introduced), key point (a main idea is being explored), example, meta-review Frequent summaries Where are we now?

13 MODEL LEARNING BEHAVIORS Begin with questions the lecture will try to answer End with questions the lecture has raised Structured Devils Advocacy Assumption Hunting Team teaching - peer critique

14 LESSON PLANNING Multiple Modalities (aim for 3 per lesson) - e.g. lecturing, demonstration, small group application, silent writing, visual illustration, newsprint dialog Lesson Structure depends on learning you wish to achieve CIQ will tell you what is working & for how many

15 LESSON PLANNING contd. Frequent recaps Frequent explanations Regular example exercises - students write (on 3x5, on newsprint, or on board) examples to illustrate a skill or idea youre teaching Tie each learning activity to homework

16 FINAL THOUGHTS Beware the Perfect Ten syndrome Teaching is Informed Muddling Through Dont be who you arent Resistance / Hostility are normal & not caused by you Never underestimate your power

17 RESOURCES THE SKILLFUL TEACHER DISCUSSION AS A WAY OF TEACHING BECOMING A CRITICALLY REFLECTIVE TEACHER All available from Jossey-Bass Publishers (San Francisco)


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