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Database Searching: How to Find Journal Articles? START Edit by: Dr. Mostafa Hassnin Library and Information Technology Mass Communication and Information.

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Presentation on theme: "Database Searching: How to Find Journal Articles? START Edit by: Dr. Mostafa Hassnin Library and Information Technology Mass Communication and Information."— Presentation transcript:

1 Database Searching: How to Find Journal Articles? START Edit by: Dr. Mostafa Hassnin Library and Information Technology Mass Communication and Information Science Dept.

2 I. Understanding Online Databases What are online databases? Online databases are Web-based electronic indexes that enable you to locate and retrieve articles in magazines, journals and newspapers. NEXT

3 Multidisciplinary (Comprehensive) vs. Subject Specific Database coverage may be comprehensive e.g., Academic Search Premier, or on a particular subject, e.g., ABI/Inform Global. Full text vs. Citation only A database may contain full text articles or only citations. Types of Databases — NEXT

4 II. Finding the Right Database(s) for Your Research Topic What databases are available from the Library? Which databases are comprehensive and may be the best place to start searching? Which specialized database is appropriate for my subject-oriented research? NEXT

5 What databases are available from the Library? The library subscribes to a number of online databases which cover various subjects. Remote access allows you to search off campus. Click By Title or By Subject or By Provider on the Library Homepage to get a database list with descriptions and access information.Library Homepage NEXT

6 Which databases are comprehensive? Academic Search Premier, Wilson Omni File & InfoTrac OneFile* Why should you start with one of the above ? They cover nearly all subject areas or disciplines. They provide a large number of full-text journal articles. They let you limit your search to scholarly journals. NEXT

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9 Which specialized database is appropriate for my subject-oriented research? You may select a specialized database from the list By Subject. When you browse the list and select an online database, consider the following questions: Which database covers my research subject? Can I get full text articles? Can I limit the search to scholarly journal articles? What other sources are available ? For example: NEXT

10 You are doing research on an Business topic: NEXT Electronic Database DatabaseSubjectWeb Address ABI/Inform Global Business/Economicsproquest.umi.com/login ABI/Inform Global Business/Economicsproquest.umi.com/login Helecon ScimaEconomicshelecon.hkkk.fi/?&lang =eng Engineering Village2 (Compendex & Inspec) Engineering ge2.org IEEEXPLOREEngineering ioj.iee.org.uk

11 ABI/INFORM Global Offer the most current peer reviewed titles More image content offering complete access to important charts, graphs, tables. Deep Backfile to 86 with median title starting in 93. Gale Business Resource Ctr ABI includes over 300 active full titles not available from Gale As with the unique indexing offered by Gale, much of its unique full text is news, trade and industry content. Ebsco Business Source Premier ABI offers full text for nearly 300 titles not available from Ebsco. As with the unique indexing offered by Ebsco, much of its unique full text is news, trade and industry content. Shallow file starting in 90 with median title starting in 95. Business Periodical Full Text Based on Title List as of January 2001 Gale Title Lists do not identify Embargo or peer reviewed Titles

12 III. Locating & Retrieving Relevant Articles Each database has its own search interface and capabilities. Many of the basic search concepts and features are similar: Keyword searching Limiters Boolean operators What are some common searching problems and solutions? Where can you find more assistance for some of the library’s databases? NEXT

13 Keyword Searching Keyword searching is the easiest search method, but may be less precise. Databases collect, sort and present information according to FIELDS (which are usually found in a dropdown menu), such as: Author Title of article Subject Publication name To make your search more specific, you may select one or more fields to do keyword search. To expand your search, you may search for keyword(s) in All basic or Default fields. NEXT

14 Limiters Limiters are database functions that let you narrow your search results. Database limiters may include: Scholarly (Peer Reviewed) Publication year Full text Language, etc. NEXT

15 Boolean Operator: AND AND l inks words or phrases that must both appear in the same article. If you what to focus your search results, use Boolean operator AND to connect additional word(s) Example: computer and teaching -- finds both computer and teaching anywhere in the same article. NEXT

16 Boolean Operator: OR OR links synonyms, alternative forms of expression, acronyms, and so on. If you want to expand your search, use Boolean operator OR to connect additional word(s). Example: first grade or elementary school -- finds either first grade or elementary school in the same article. NEXT

17 Proximity Searches You can use a proximity search to search for two or more words that occur within a specified number of words (or fewer) of each other in the databases. Proximity searching is used with a keyword or Boolean search. The proximity operators are composed of a letter (N or W) and a number (to specify the number of words). The proximity operator is placed between the words that are to be searched, as follows:  Near Operator (N) - N5 finds the words if they are within five words of one another regardless of the order in which they appear. For example, type tax N5 reform to find results that would match tax reform as well as reform of income tax.  Within Operator (W) - In the following example, W8 finds the words if they are within eight words of one another and in the order in which you entered them. For example, type tax W8 reform to find results that would match tax reform but would not match reform of income tax.

18 Common Searching Problems & Solutions (I) 1. Citation list is too long Narrow your search using additional terms connected by AND; Limit your search by limiter functions; Try to find the official descriptor or subject heading that matches your keyword(s) in the thesaurus or subject index provided by the database. NEXT

19 Common Searching Problems & Solutions (II) 2. No citations Check the spelling of your search terms; Eliminate one or more of your search terms; Don’t fill in every empty text box or drop-down menu choice; Try to find the official descriptor or subject heading that matches your topic; Make sure appropriate database is used; Call (???) to ask a reference librarian for assistance. NEXT

20 InfoTrac OneFile vs. the Competition

21 Search techniques Click for the instruction on searching Academic Search Premier of EBSCOHost. Click for the instruction on InfoTrac OneFile. Click for the instruction on ABI/Inform NEXT

22 ebrary database have more than 60,000 online, full-text books. NetLibrary Database More than 100,000 titles and hundreds of global publishers publishers h.asp

23 All sources of information that you use in your research must be cited, including information found on the Web. Your may require that you use a specific style guide to cite sources in your research papers, footnotes, and bibliographies.

24 Style Manuals APA Style (American Psychological Association)APA Style Chicago Style (University of Chicago Press)Chicago Style IEEE Standards Style (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers)IEEE Standards Style IEEE Standards Style (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers)IEEE Standards Style MLA (Modern Language Association)MLA Below are links to sample citations using standard basic style guides

25 Format : Author. "Article title." Journal Title Volume (Date): Pages. Database. Vendor. Date of access. Example: Lehrer, Eli. "Cities Combat Violent Crime." Insight on the News 15 (July 19, 1999): 14. Expanded Academic Index ASAP. Gale Group. October, 5, Format: "Title of article." Title of Source. Version or Edition. Date of Update. Publisher. Date of Access. URL. Example: "Civil Rights Movement." Encyclopædia Britannica Online. Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc. October 5,1999

26 Format: Title. Author. Date. Name of database. Date of Access. URL. Example: Annual Report on School Safety, U.S. Department of Education. October Congressional Information Service, Inc. American Statistics Index. October 6, Format: Page Title. Author. Date of Last Update. Sponsor. Date of Access. URL. Example: Institute for Information Literacy. Mary Jane Petrowski. August 3, Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL). October 15,

27 ?mode=form&g=6&list=nonprint&cm=13 1.There are interactive web tools which helps teachers and students produce reference citations. Includes MLA and APA formats.

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