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Lecture 5 Outlining the Speech Giving Informative Speeches.

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1 Lecture 5 Outlining the Speech Giving Informative Speeches

2 I. Outlining the Speech: Preparation outline: 1) State the specific purpose of your speech; 2) Identify the central idea; 3) Label the introduction, body, and conclusion; 4) Use a consistent pattern of Visual Framework; 5) State main points and sub-points in full sentences.

3 Use a consistent pattern of Visual Framework: 1) I. Main point A. Sub-point B. Sub-point 1. Sub-subpoint 2. Sub-subpoint II. Main point: A. Sub-point 1. Sub-subpoint 2. Sub-subpoint B. Sub-point

4 Give your speech a title: Unsafe Drinking Water  Is Your Water Safe to Drink? The Rage to Diet  Diets: How Effective Are They? The Sounds of Silence  Can You See What I ’ m Saying?

5 Speaking Outline: 1) Follow the same Visual Framework used in the preparation outline: 2) Make sure the outline is legible: 3) Keep the outline as brief as possible: 4) Give yourself cues/clues for delivering the speech.

6 Informative Speeches: --- a speech designed to convey knowledge and understanding --- General Criteria: is the information communicated … accurate,clear,and made meaningful and interesting? --- Types of informative speeches: about objects, processes, events and concepts.

7 A: Speeches about objects: Ex: the human eye; digital cameras; seaweed; Grand Canyon … a. To inform my audience about the geological features of the Grand Canyon. b. To inform my audience what to look for when buying a digital camera. c. To inform my audience about the commercial uses of seaweed. --- Usually in chronological, spatial and topical order.

8 Ex: Specific Purpose: To inform my audience about the major alternative-fuel cars now being developed. Central Idea: The major alternative-fuel cars now being developed are powered by electricity, natural gas, methanol, or hydrogen. Main Points: I. One kind of alternative-fuel car is powered by electricity. II. A second kind of alternative-fuel car is powered by natural gas. III. A third kind of alternative-fuel car is powered by methanol. IV. A fourth kind of alternative-fuel car is powered by hydrogen.

9 B. Speeches about processes: 1.- explains a process so that listeners will understand it better; Ex: To inform my audience how hurricanes develop explains a process so listeners will be better able to perform the process themselves. Ex: To inform my audience how to write an effective job resume; Ex: To inform my audience how to save people from drowning. --- usually in chronological, topical order.

10 Ex: Specific Purpose: To inform my audience of the common methods used by stage magicians to perform their trick. Central Idea: Stage magicians use two common methods to perform their tricks --- mechanical devices and sleight of hand. Main Points: I. Many magic tricks rely on mechanical devices that may require little skill by the magician. II. Other magic tricks depend on the magician ’ s skill in fooling people by sleight-of- hand manipulation.

11 C. Speeches about events: Ex: mountain climbing; civil rights movement; job interviews … --- Usually in chronological or causal order, topical order. you can approach an event from almost any angle or combination of angles --- features, origins, implications, benefits, future developments …

12 Ex: Specific Purpose: To inform my audience about the history of the disability rights movement. Central Idea: The disability rights movements has made major strides during the past 40 years. Main Points: I. The disability rights movement began in Berkeley, CA, during the mid-1960s. II. The movement achieved its first major victory in 1973 with passage of the federal Rehabilitation Act. III. The movement reached another milestone in 1990 when Congress approved the Americans with Disability Act. IV. Today the movement is spreading to countries beyond the U.S.

13 D. Speeches about concepts: Ex: Confucianism, philosophies of education, principles of feminism, concepts of science, international law … --- usually in topical order, to define the concept, identify its major elements, and illustrate it with specific examples, or explain competing schools of thought about the same subject;

14 Ex: Specific Purpose: To inform my audience about the basic principles of Afrocentrism. Central Idea: The basic principles of Afrocentrism have a theoretical and a practical dimension. Main Points: I. The theoretical dimension of Afrocentrism looks at historical and social events from an African rather than a European perspective. II. The practical dimension of Afrocentrism calls for reforming the school curriculum to fit the needs and cultural experiences of African- American children.

15 E. Guidelines for informative speaking: Don ’ t overestimate what the audience knows: Relate the subject directly to the audience: Don ’ t be too technical: Avoid abstractions: Personalize your ideas.


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