Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Mary Ellen Guffey Copyright © 2008 Chapter 16 Interviewing and Following Up.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Mary Ellen Guffey Copyright © 2008 Chapter 16 Interviewing and Following Up."— Presentation transcript:

1 Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Mary Ellen Guffey Copyright © 2008 Chapter 16 Interviewing and Following Up

2 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 2 Interviewing and Following Up Purposes and Types of Interviews Before the Interview During the Interview Interview Questions Closing the Interview After the Interview

3 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 3 Purposes of Interviews  To convince the employer of your potential.  To find out more about the job and the company.  To expand on the information in your résumé.

4 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 4 Hiring/Placement Interviews Goal: To learn whether a candidate is a good fit for the organization. Conducted in person. Types of Interviews One-on-one Interviews Panel Interviews Sequential Interviews Stress Interviews

5 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 5 Screening Interviews Goal: To weed out unqualified candidates. Often conducted by telephone. Types of Interviews

6 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 6 Preparing and Practicing  Study the job description. How do your skills and accomplishments fit the position?  Prepare success stories. Before the Interview  Practice answers to typical interview questions. Make your best responses automatic.

7 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 7 Researching the Target Company  Know the leaders, company products, finances, goals, competition, accomplishments, setbacks.  If possible, interview employees. Consult blogs and other Web sources. Before the Interview

8 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 8  Record a practice session to see how you come across.  Expect to explain problem areas on your résumé. Before the Interview  Decide how to dress professionally.  Gather what you will bring with you. Preparing and Practicing

9 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 9 Sending Positive Nonverbal Messages  Control your body movements.  Exhibit good posture. During the Interview  Make frequent eye contact but don't get into a staring contest.  Smile enough to convey a positive attitude. © Nancy Ney / DK Stock / Getty Images

10 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 10 During the Interview  Listen attentively.  Turn off your cell phone. Don't chew gum.  Sound enthusiastic and interested--but sincere.  Avoid "empty" words—um, uh, like, basically. Sending Positive Nonverbal Messages © Nancy Ney / DK Stock / Getty Images

11 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 11 Fighting Fear During the Interview  Practice interviewing as much as you can, particularly with real companies.  Prepare 110 percent.  Know how you will answer the most frequently asked questions.  Be ready with your success stories.

12 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 12  Take deep breaths, particularly before the interview.  Know that you are not alone. Everyone feels anxiety during a job interview.  Remember that it's a two-way street. You are also evaluating the interviewer and his or her organization. This should give you confidence. Fighting Fear During the Interview

13 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 13 © Photodisc Getty Images Projecting a Professional Demeanor During the Interview  Greet the interviewer and shake hands.  Answer questions confidently.  Refocus to clarify vague questions: "By ____, do you mean _____?"  Focus on your strengths; do not reveal weaknesses.  Use good English and enunciate clearly.

14 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 14 Kinds of Interview Questions Questions to Get Acquainted  Tell me about yourself.  What are your greatest strengths? Questions to Gauge Your Interest  Why do you want to work for _______?  Why are you interested in this position?

15 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 15 Kinds of Interview Questions Questions About Your Experience and Accomplishments  Why should we hire you when we have applicants with more experience or better credentials?  How do your qualifications and experience prepare you for this position?

16 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 16 Kinds of Interview Questions Questions About the Future  Where do you expect to be five years from now?  If you got this position, what would you do to fit in? Challenging Questions  What is your greatest weakness?  How would your former supervisor describe you as an employee?

17 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 17 Kinds of Interview Questions Questions About Money  How much money are you looking for?  How much do you think you're worth? Situational Questions  If you were aware that a coworker was falsifying data, what would you do?  If you had to handle an irate customer, what would you do?

18 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 18 Kinds of Interview Questions Behavioral Questions  Tell me about a time when you solved a difficult problem.  Describe a time when you worked successfully as part of a team.

19 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 19 Kinds of Interview Questions Illegal and Inappropriate Questions  What is your marital status?  Do you have any disabilities?  How old are you?  Where are you from?  Have you ever been arrested?  Do you have children?  How much do you weigh?

20 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 20 Using the STAR Method to Answer Behavioral Interview Questions Behavioral interview questions may begin with “Tell me about a time when you....” To answer effectively, use the S T A R method: What was the Situation? What was the Task? What Action was taken? What was the Result? S T A R

21 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 21 Closing the Interview Asking Your Own Questions  What will my duties be?  What is it like working here, in terms of the people, management practices, work loads, expected performance, and rewards?  What training programs does this organization offer?

22 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 22  Who would be my immediate supervisor?  What is the organizational structure, and where does this position fit in?  What is the first problem that needs the attention of the person you hire? Asking Your Own Questions Closing the Interview

23 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 23  How will my job performance be evaluated?  What do you like best about working for this organization?  When will I hear from you regarding further action on my application? Asking Your Own Questions Closing the Interview

24 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 24 Ending Positively  When the interviewer signals the end of the interview, stand up and shake hands.  Find out what action will follow.  Ask, "When can I expect to hear from you?" Closing the Interview

25 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 25  After his or her reply, say, "If I don't hear from you by then, may I call you?"  Thank the interviewer.  Say goodbye to the receptionist. Closing the Interview Ending Positively

26 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 26 © Tom Grill / Corbis After the Interview  Make notes on the interview as soon as you leave.  Alert your references that they might be called.

27 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 27  Write a thank-you letter to the interviewer. Remind the interviewer of your visit. Show that you really want the job and that you are qualified for it.  If you don't hear from the interviewer within the specified time, call. © Tom Grill / Corbis After the Interview

28 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 28 Typical Applicant Evaluation Form Applicant's Name _______________________ Position _____________ Overall AppraisalPoorAverage Good 1. Initial impression Personal demeanor Preparation for interview Ability to express self12345 Career Qualifications 1. Academic preparation Professional experience Technical skills Leadership ability Career potential12345

29 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 29 Personality Impressions These judgments are impressions. You may expand your responses on the back. Dominance:Aggressive, passive Self-regard:Positive, negative Self-confidence:Strong, weak General behavior:Friendly, shy, hostile Interactions:Spontaneous, guarded Feelings about change:Accepts or enjoys, fearful Overall Evaluation Would this person be an asset to the company? What should this applicant's hiring priority be on a 1 to 10 scale? Typical Applicant Evaluation Form

30 End Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 16, Slide 30


Download ppt "Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Mary Ellen Guffey Copyright © 2008 Chapter 16 Interviewing and Following Up."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google