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Civic Socialising Older people and social interaction in local neighbourhood shops Joan Stewart Colette Browning Jane Sims Image permission: Microsoft.

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Presentation on theme: "Civic Socialising Older people and social interaction in local neighbourhood shops Joan Stewart Colette Browning Jane Sims Image permission: Microsoft."— Presentation transcript:

1 Civic Socialising Older people and social interaction in local neighbourhood shops Joan Stewart Colette Browning Jane Sims Image permission: Microsoft

2 There is a largely theoretical knowledge-base about the value of interactions with others who are not family or friends (Blau, 2009, Fingerman, 2004, Fingerman, 2009, Kang, 1996) Neighbourhood shops have been recognised as a places that enable social interaction (Oldenburg, 1991, Macintyre, 2000, Smith, 2000, Scarpello, 2009, Horne, 1984) Why investigate this? Image permission: Microsoft

3 club neighbours friends church family others ?

4 Research approaches were largely:  quantitative  commonly employed: - closed questions - network mapping - pre-determined typologies - large non-purpose-collected data bases from which data were over interpreted How / Why ? Appraisal of journal articles concerned with older people’s social ‘networks’ published between 1979 and 2011

5 Common research themes / underlying ethos:  Dependency  Risk of social deficit  Depression  Disease  Mortality How / Why ?

6  Interpretive and exploratory (classic grounded theory)  Focus on older people’s relationships with people other than their family or friends  A perspective that older people tend to be proactive and resilient, rather than dependent and despondent My approach

7 Method Sample Data Site Classic grounded theory 1 Theoretical Older shoppers av. age 79 (11) Shop-keepers (6) Interviews Observation 1 Glaser, B. and Strauss, A The Discovery of Grounded Theory. Aldine, Chicago.

8

9 Inductive / constant comparative method Aims to identify the participants’ main concern … …develop succinct conceptual theory of how participants resolve their concern Classic Grounded Theory 1 Glaser, B. and Strauss, A The Discovery of Grounded Theory. Aldine, Chicago.

10 ‘Oh here comes the Smiths … you know (laughs) and its everybody in the shop knows us’ ‘See in the big shopping centre they don’t really know you… you could be a chair’ ‘It’s (the neighbourhood) not a grotty area (amusement) it’s the only way I can put it’ ‘I feel if I’m buying something they (shopkeeper) should be polite to me’ ‘People who go there all the time it’s a bonding experience …we all help each other because we know and we see each other’ Identity Status Trust Coding

11 ‘... but we already had a liquor shop see so we all howled that down’ Surveillance Censorship ‘That was the grocer yes he wanted a licence for liquor...’ ‘My argument was.. if they allow there’s not room for two.. there’s only room for one and if they allowed another one in one business would go broke and then you’d have a chain reaction’

12 Authentication Influence Identity Status Trust Surveillance Censorship Codes Category / Conceptual hypotheses Membership

13 Stages in the development of the conceptual theory Stage123 Main concern Conceptual theory Theoretical hypotheses Authentication Influence Membership ?? Codes (concepts) Trust ?? Identity ? Status ? Surveillance Not yet identified Censorship Not yet identified Choice Not yet identified

14 ‘I shop there because we’ve got (bold type denotes emphasis) to have a grocer shop’ ‘If they don’t get the customer turnover they close up’ Researcher: ‘I got a sense that the people who live in this area keep those shops in business cause they want them to stay’ Participant: ‘To stay, that’s right’ Choice Present time

15 ‘We’ve got everything if we wanted it... say we don’t drive a car anymore you could go down here and almost get anything you want’ ‘If they’re going to make us all have.. drivers’ tests and then they say well you’re not able to drive that will force people to look for the local shops and then you don’t have a choice and because through that.. it will continue on because we want those who want to be independent and not rely on relatives or whatever to drive you to shops if you want to be’ Choice Future

16 Consolidation Strengthening their community standing and maintaining the milieu of the local shops = autonomy now and in the future Main concern of the participants

17 Aim Civic Socialising

18 Research Policy and practice Extension of the knowledge-base

19 Policy and practice ‘Well you can go there even if you are on a walking frame you know or walking with a stick I mean you can make it that far from here’ ‘And you see the thing is they do mending like I don’t have a machine anymore and my hands don’t work (shows hands) so if it’s a zip in here or ah well will you take this up’ Implications

20 Age Care Reform Package ‘Living Longer. Living Better’ ‘provides older Australians with more choice, more control and easier access to a full range of services, where they want it and when they need it’ Implications

21 Independence or dependence?  Focus is on support service provision  Home delivery of goods or shopping services while an older person remains at home could isolate them Older people who live in an unsafe environment or areas with multiple physical barriers are less likely to get out and therefore more prone to isolation, depression, reduced fitness and increased mobility problems (World Health Organisation, 2012)

22 Current structures and services to enable an ‘independence model of care’ are already overburdened or inadequate (The Allen Consulting Group Care Coalition, 2007) We need

23 Enabling environments Identify the ways that older people currently look after themselves We need

24 Open Helsinki project 2010 A collaboration between Sitra and OK Do World Design Capital 2012 Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0.

25 Further research Civic Socialising … Other neighbourhoods? Younger people? Different socioeconomic circumstances? Could a similar beneficial effect be gained if a local shop was introduced?


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