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Book 16 (40) Your heart is unbending. But if in your mind you are shunning some oracle, and your queenly mother has declared to you anything from Zeus,

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Presentation on theme: "Book 16 (40) Your heart is unbending. But if in your mind you are shunning some oracle, and your queenly mother has declared to you anything from Zeus,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Book 16 (40) Your heart is unbending. But if in your mind you are shunning some oracle, and your queenly mother has declared to you anything from Zeus, yet at least send me forth speedily, and with me let the rest of the host of the Myrmidons follow, if I may prove a light of deliverance to the Danaans. [40] And grant me to buckle upon my shoulders that armour of yours, in hope that the Trojans may take me for you, and so desist from war.

2 (69) These things will we let be, as past and done. In no way, I suppose, was I to be filled with ceaseless wrath at heart; yet I really deemed that I should not make an end of my anger until the hour when the war-cry and the battle should come to my own ships. But come, put on your shoulders my glorious armour, [65] and lead forth the war-loving Myrmidons to the fight, if the dark cloud of the Trojans lies over the ships mightily, and those others abide with nothing to support them but the shore of the sea.

3 (96) Listen, so that I may put in your mind the sum of my counsel to the end that you may win me great recompense and glory [85] at the hands of all the Danaans and they send back that beauteous girl, and give glorious gifts. When you have driven them from the ships, come back, and if the loud- thundering lord of Hera grant you to win glory, be not inclined apart from me to war [90] against the war-loving Trojans: you will lessen my honour. Nor yet, as you exult in war and conflict, and slay the Trojans, lead on to Ilium, lest one of the gods that are for ever shall come down from Olympus and enter the fray

4 (258) And in the front of all two warriors arrayed themselves for war, even Patroclus and Automedon, both of one mind, [220] to war in the forefront of the Myrmidons. But Achilles prayed... :“Zeus, you king, Dodonaean, Pelasgian, you that dwelt afar, ruling over wintry Dodona, — and about you dwell the Selli, [235] your own interpreters, men with unwashen feet that crouch on the ground. Aforetime verily you did hear my word, when I prayed: me you did honour, and did mightily smite the host of the Achaeans; even so now also fulfill you for me this my desire. Myself verily will I abide in the gathering of the ships, [240] but my comrade am I sending forth amid the host of the Myrmidons to war: with him do you send forth glory, O Zeus, whose voice is borne afar, and make bold the heart in his breast, to the end that Hector, too, may know whether even alone my squire has skill to fight, or whether his hands [245] then only rage invincible, when I enter the turmoil of Ares. But when away from the ships he has driven war and the din of war, then all-unscathed let him come back to the swift ships with all his arms, and his comrades that fight in close combat.”

5 (326) When the Trojans saw the valiant son of Menoetius, himself and his squire, shining in their armour, [280] the heart of each man was stirred, and their battalions were shaken, for they deemed that by the ships the swift-footed son of Peleus had cast aside his wrath and had chosen friendliness; and each man gazed about to see how he might escape utter destruction.

6 (512) The son of crooked-counseling Cronos took pity when he saw them, and spoke to Hera, his sister and his wife:“Ah, woe is me, for it is fated that Sarpedon, dearest of men to me, be slain by Patroclus, son of Menoetius! [435] And in two ways is my heart divided in counsel as I ponder in my thought whether I shall snatch him up while yet he lives and set him afar from the tearful war in the rich land of Lycia, or whether I shall slay him now beneath the hands of the son of Menoetius.” Then ox-eyed queenly Hera answered him: [440] “Most dread son of Cronos, what a word have you said! A man that is mortal, doomed long since by fate, are you minded to deliver again from dolorous death? Do as you will; but be sure that we other gods do not assent to it. And another thing will I tell you, and take it to heart: [445] if you send Sarpedon living to his house, think how afterwards some other god may also be minded to send his own dear son away from the fierce conflict.

7 784 Give him to swift conveyers to bear with them, even to the twin brothers, Sleep and Death, who shall set him speedily in the rich land of wide Lycia. There shall his brethren and his kinsfolk give him burial [675] with mound and pillar; for this is the due of the dead.”

8 805 But ever is the intent of Zeus stronger than that of men, for he drives even a valiant man in rout, and robs him of victory [690] full easily, and again of himself he rouses men to fight; and he it was that now put fury in the breast of Patroclus.

9 (916) Phoebus met you in the fierce conflict, an awful god. And Patroclus marked him not as he passed through the turmoil, [790] for enfolded in thick mist did he meet him; and Apollo took his stand behind him, and struck his back and broad shoulders with the flat of his hand, and his eyes were made to whirl. And from his head Phoebus Apollo knocked the helmet. This time, Hector, you boast mightily; for to you have [845] Zeus, the son of Cronos, and Apollo, assured victory, they that subdued me easily, for of themselves they took the harness from my shoulders. But if twenty such as you had faced me, here would all have perished, slain by my spear. No, it was baneful Fate and the son of Leto that slew me, [850] and of men Euphorbus, while you are the third in my slaying. And another thing will I tell you, and take it to heart: you shall not yourself be long in life, but even now does death stand hard by you, and mighty fate, that you be slain beneath the hands of Achilles.”


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