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Introducing A partnership of cotton universities, ginners, warehouses and oil mills, equipment, seed and chemical suppliers, and other supporters of the.

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Presentation on theme: "Introducing A partnership of cotton universities, ginners, warehouses and oil mills, equipment, seed and chemical suppliers, and other supporters of the."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Introducing A partnership of cotton universities, ginners, warehouses and oil mills, equipment, seed and chemical suppliers, and other supporters of the cotton industry dedicated to supporting increased cotton acreage in North Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas.

3 Cotton Acreage is Increasing Why are more producers in North Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas switching to cotton?

4 Cotton Market Prices Cotton offers more profit potential than wheat, sorghum or corn.

5 Cotton Production Costs are Down Growers can produce dryland cotton for an average of $113 per acre and irrigated cotton for just $188 per acre. --Averages of University and industry estimated costs

6 Cotton is Easier and Less Expensive to Grow Roundup Ready ® cotton reduces weed control costs, permits conservation tillage and improves control of grassy weeds in wheat. Bt cotton has reduced or even eliminated insecticide applications for worms. Virtual boll weevil eradication means reduced costs, a bigger top crop and increased profits.

7 Cotton Produces more Yield from Irrigation Water Cotton offers the best profit return on limited water resources. Cotton delivers $35 to $40 per inch of water, compared to a return of $30 to $32 for corn, $16 to $18 for sorghum and $10 to $12 for wheat. (Texas Tech University)

8 Cotton Produces Bigger Yields in Dryland Areas Cotton can produce bigger yields and profits than wheat, sorghum and other crops under dryland conditions.

9 Cotton Strengthens Crop Rotation Programs Improved disease and weed control. Bigger yields of wheat, sorghum and peanuts. Irrigated sorghum demonstrated an 18 percent yield increase following cotton, compared to continuous sorghum, while cotton lint yields increased by 28 percent, 20 percent and 9 percent following sorghum. (Texas A&M University) Peanut yields increase 300 to 600 pounds per acre when rotated after cotton

10 Cotton Returns Bigger Profits per Acre At current market prices: an average 1,000 lbs/acre irrigated cotton yield can return a net profit of $352 per acre an average dryland cotton yield of 500 lbs/acre can return a profit of $147 per acre. –Using averages of university and industry estimated costs

11 Cotton. Bigger Yields. Bigger Profits for producers in North Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas.

12 Look what cotton producers in your area have to say!

13 “There’s better profit in cotton than corn or sorghum. Depending on the year, we’ve found we can average between 400 and 900 pounds on dryland cotton, and from 800 to 1,100 pounds per acre with limited irrigation. Cotton is a good crop for Kansas.” Chuck Buss Oxford, Kansas

14 “Cotton farming is not an exact science. But it is a crop that has let me buy a farm and pay my bills in years when there wasn’t any money in wheat. We rotate dryland cotton with wheat. I’ve found that Roundup Ready cotton has helped me control the weeds in my wheat, we don’t have to spend any money on fertilizer, and both crops seem to benefit from better disease control.” Ted Thomason Hammon, Oklahoma

15 “Irrigated cotton makes better use of water than corn, and no-till cotton works well in rotation with wheat and grain sorghum. When you compare dryland cotton with wheat, grain sorghum or soybeans in this area of Kansas, cotton always comes out on top.” Robert Miller, Wellington, Kansas

16 Contact Us for More Information NTOK Cotton is a partnership of university extension services, ginners, warehouses and oil mills, equipment, seed and chemical suppliers, and other supporters of the cotton industry dedicated to supporting increased cotton acreage in North Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas.

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