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Building on Technology Science © 2015.TOC, INC. Understand that science is not just a Understand that science is not just a subject but a way of looking.

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Presentation on theme: "Building on Technology Science © 2015.TOC, INC. Understand that science is not just a Understand that science is not just a subject but a way of looking."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Building on Technology Science © 2015.TOC, INC.

3 Understand that science is not just a Understand that science is not just a subject but a way of looking at the world subject but a way of looking at the world Learn parent’s role in supporting their Learn parent’s role in supporting their child’s project and fair preparation child’s project and fair preparation Supplement the teacher’s information to Supplement the teacher’s information to ensure the student develops their project ensure the student develops their project O BJECTIVES

4 W HY IS SCIENCE IMPORTANT ? Which describes your child(ren)? A.Enjoys participating B.Participates because it’s required C.Enjoys not participating  How many like to cook or bake?  How many enjoy playing computer and/or video games?  How many like building with Legos™ or origami?  How many can calculate an athlete’s stats? Consider this about your child(ren)... We have to teach our children to be excited, interested, and explorers of all aspects of science! SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS

5 Science Fair is the time for students to express themselves through scientific research, artistic flair, creativity, and an oral presentation that exhibits confidence, knowledge, and articulation about their subject. Although everyone does not advance to the next level, participation in any Science Fair will advance a child’s exposure, experience, and excellence for a brighter future. Research Research Artistic Artistic Scientific method Scientific method  W HY D O A S CIENCE F AIR P ROJECT ?

6 areas allow students to develop and build interests in science, technology, engineering (robotics), and mathematics while increasing their preparedness and career marketability for the 21 st century.  STEM areas allow students to develop and build interests in science, technology, engineering (robotics), and mathematics while increasing their preparedness and career marketability for the 21 st century.  CPSSSF offers monetary Special Awards to students in many topic categories. students in many topic categories.  CPSSSF provides scholarships to graduating seniors that have participated in a Regional, seniors that have participated in a Regional, City, State or International Fair. City, State or International Fair. Application deadline is March 25, 2015

7 GRANT APPLICATION DEADLINE NOVEMBER 18, 2014 CONTACT: Ms. Barbara Dubielak-Wood Ms. Barbara Dubielak-Wood Office of Curriculum & Instruction: Math & Science Department, Elizabeth Center 320 N. Elizabeth St. Chicago IL GSR #38 SAVE YOUR RECEIPTS!!!

8 W HY D O A S CIENCE F AIR P ROJECT ? President Obama has also expressed the need to educate students in the STEM areas by developing an initiative for educators and businesses to produce greater numbers of children entering these fields and increasing the exposure of these subject areas to underprivileged and underrepresented students. Moreover, the White House hosts an annual science fair to showcase national winners in science, robotics, and technology.

9 W HY D O A S CIENCE F AIR P ROJECT ? When students perform a science fair project:  Use of the scientific method  Learn organizational skills  Learn problem-solving skills  Improve processing skills  Discover several solutions to problems  Build self-image and improve self-esteem  Implement technology  Practice library research

10 P ROJECT D ISTINCTIONS

11 I NVESTIGATION ExamplesSkills Students Learn How do Plants React to Different Fertilizers? __________________ The Effect of Aspartame on Onion Root Tip 6 __________________ Which Diaper Absorbs the Most Water? 7 Observation Measurement Prediction Inference Classification Control/Variable ID Graphing Construct Data Tables Experimentation Research Writing Design (display) Public Speaking ©2010. Traoul What should I test?

12 P ROJECT D ISTINCTIONS Aerospace Science Behavioral Science BiochemistryBotanyChemistry Computer Science Earth Science Electronics * Engineering * Environmental Science Health Science Materials Science MathematicsMicrobiologyPhysicsZoology * Robotics is not a category in the Chicago Public School Science Fair; however, a project may be submitted under these categories. ©2010. Traoul I KNOW WHAT AREA I’LL INVESTIGATE!

13 Encourage students to explore: an interest an interest a fascination a fascination an idea that raises a question that would be stimulating to answer. an idea that raises a question that would be stimulating to answer. EXPERIMENTAL PROCESS

14 Control Groups vs. Experimental Groups Control Group: A study group that is used for comparison but is not changed or manipulated in the experiment. Experimental Groups: Groups that have something done to them. The “something” is a variable. Independent Variable: Scientist manipulates or changes “something” in the experiment. Dependent Variable: The response or effect of the manipulation is measured. Example: To study the effect of different concentrations of table sugar on the growth of onion root tips. Control: tap water without sugar Experimental control: same variety of onions grown in sugar with different concentrations (e.g. 10%, 50%, 90%) Independent variable: sugar mixed with water at 10%, 50% and 90% concentrations Dependent variable: measure the length (daily) of root tips in the different concentrations

15 P ROJECT D ISTINCTIONS 1. Describe in detail a problem that your design will solve relating to a real world need. 2. Describe target users; science behind design; answer questions about user needs; information about products of similar needs; research about design criteria; what solutions exist and how well do they solve the problem 3. Three Designs: Engineering Computer Science Mathematics 4. Engineering projects should have a materials list, programming and mathematical projects do not need a materials list. Include a block diagram, flowchart or sketch. Describe how all of the parts will work together. 5. Construct and test a prototype of the best design. Targeted users in test may be used to get feedback on design; or some projects may analyze data sets. 7. Report should provide information for someone unfamiliar with project to understand: what you tried to accomplish; how you did it; and whether you succeeded. Include problems and methods of solving them. 6. Evidence that changes in design were made to better meet the criteria. Test results may be in tables, if applicable. Data analysis /validation may be included. Handbook pp. 2-4, 28-30

16 P ROJECT D ISTINCTIONS S YMPOSIUM, E SSAY & M ORE … SYMPOSIUM High school students High school students Original research reviewed by panel of scientists and/or industry leaders Original research reviewed by panel of scientists and/or industry leaders Submit four (4) copies of entry form, abstract, image consent Submit four (4) copies of entry form, abstract, image consent form, and research summary form, and research summary a copy of research summary to a copy of research summary to Endorsement DEADLINE is November 14, 2015 Endorsement DEADLINE is November 14, 2015 Refer to 2015 Handbook, pages 41 for detailsRefer to 2015 Handbook, pages 41 for details ESSAY Students in grades 7 – 12 Students in grades 7 – 12 Library research paper Library research paper Topic: “Chemistry Has All the Solutions!” Topic: “Chemistry Has All the Solutions!” Narrow topic to write a proper essay Narrow topic to write a proper essay Essay must be between 1,200-1,500 words Essay must be between 1,200-1,500 words Submit four (4) copies of essay w/essay cover Submit four (4) copies of essay w/essay cover page attached to each; three (3) copies of page attached to each; three (3) copies of entry form; and a copy of image consent form entry form; and a copy of image consent form Refer to 2015 Handbook, page 42 for details IJAS Cover Design Contest Students in grades 7 – 12 Students in grades 7 – 12 Do not need a project, paper, or essay Do not need a project, paper, or essay Theme: “Chemistry Has All the Solutions!” Theme: “Chemistry Has All the Solutions!” Use an 8.5”X 11”white paper, black ink, portrait Use an 8.5”X 11”white paper, black ink, portrait orientation, indicate the words: Illinois Junior Academy orientation, indicate the words: Illinois Junior Academy of Science on design; and on back: name, mailing of Science on design; and on back: name, mailing address, home phone, school name, sponsor name, address, home phone, school name, sponsor name, state region (3 for Chicago), and sponsor’s state region (3 for Chicago), and sponsor’s Refer to 2015 Handbook page 43 for details MONETARY AWARDS ARE AVAILABLE!!!

17 1 st Any questions about your experiment can be directed to: Advise-A-Student Elizabeth Copper Lindblom Math & Science Academy , S CIENCE F AIR

18 Which graph would you suggest a student use for the following data? LengthDays Trial ChemicalAmount Hydrogen Nitrogen78 Oxygen21 CO Other1 S CIENCE F AIR Trend over time Line Graph Compares percentages Pie Chart Measures one variable Bar Graph

19 Reason(s) for the topic choice How/Why did student arise at their hypothesis Controlled experiment with at least one manipulated variable The number of trials performed Quantitative results NO qualitative results (looks) Metrics with correct abbr. (e.g. g, mL, C) Data recorded regularly Results presented in a table, chart, or graph Results relate to hypothesis Conclusion related to the question or problem Calculate, when applicable: mean, standard deviation, standard error, or other statistical measurement Science is measurement and reproducibility. It is a fundamental scientific truth that no measurement is ever 100% accurate. J UDGING C RITERIA

20  Judges will read the Review of Literature (ROL) which should be written in the students words or paraphrased.  The ROL should be proofread and edited by a teacher and/or parent before being submitted to the science fair.  The research must be cited if copied from an author (anything not cited is plagiarism). Therefore, most paragraphs in the ROL should be cited, except data collected, results, and some conclusion(s).  Judges like to see photographs of the child performing the experiment on the display board. Remember: Honest answers to questions impress judges more than making up responses. J UDGING C RITERIA

21 Students must have confidence in themselves and knowledge about their experiment which will allow them to feel more comfortable during the judging process.  Speak clearly, slowly, and deliberately  Talk directly to the judge  Stand, don’t sit  Dress for success  DO NOT chew gum or candy Remember: first impressions are lasting J UDGING C RITERIA

22  DO NOT perform the experiment for your child  Help your young scientist understand the purpose  learn critical thinking, problem solving, research, and more  understand that science is all around us  take time to develop a project (at least 4 – 8 weeks)  Support your young scientist  Visit the library  Listen to oral presentation, repeatedly  Give suggestions, criticisms, praise  Ask questions so s/he “thinks” more about the project  Reach out to the teacher for assistance  Read the CPSSSF Handbook and contact SSF, as needed. P ARENT ’ S R OLE

23 Glassware Chemicals Hazardous Materials Fire Hazards Radiation Hazards Production of Alcohol Lasers Ultraviolet Light Sources Biological Hazards Electrical Hazards Mechanical Hazards Help your young scientists stay SAFE by monitoring the use of the following hazards: WARNING: Your child’s project may be disqualified for violations of safety guidelines. Ensure all rules and regulations are followed, especially those dealing with animal experimentation. H E L P !!! Safety Questions: Lorel Madden P ARENT ’ S R OLE

24  Keep a detailed and organized notebook of all aspects of your experiment.  Don’t erase notes because they may provide information for another part of your experiment.  Document the date—and the time of day, if this is a test variable—of everything you write in the notebook.  Consider factors that may contribute to experimental errors.  Review of Literature  Scientific method  Abstract  Safety Guidelines  Purpose  Hypothesis  Materials  Variables  Independent  Dependent  Procedure  Results/Data  Graph  Conclusion Note all observations and observe all notes! Make sure the scientific method is followed… P ARENT ’ S R OLE

25 Books Encyclopedias Journals Periodicals Newspapers Magazines Cassette recordings Computer programs CD-ROM Films Videos Interviews Remember: use the correct format for sources based on the specifications of CPSSSF, Inc. Although the internet is the most convenient source for information, you will benefit greatly by using resources at the library. Limit online usage for references! Personal Electronic Communication ( ) Refer to, Handbook pp. 31 – 34 for the correct format for citations and references P ARENT ’ S R OLE Citations/Reference List Typical sources include, but are not limited to:

26 Your CHILD’S science fair experience should: Be enjoyableBe enjoyable Develop critical thinking skills Be creative Develop time management skills Be interestingBe interesting Develop esteem and speaking skills Teach about the fascinating role and importance science plays in our world!

27 Tracy Raoul CPSSSF Parent Involvement Glennie King 2015 Student Science Fair Chairperson Luba Johnson 2015 CPS Regional Network Science Fair Coordinator


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