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1 Leading an Effective Learning System Presented by Lawrence W. Lezotte, Ph.D. EFFECTIVE SCHOOLS.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Leading an Effective Learning System Presented by Lawrence W. Lezotte, Ph.D. EFFECTIVE SCHOOLS."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Leading an Effective Learning System Presented by Lawrence W. Lezotte, Ph.D. EFFECTIVE SCHOOLS

2

3 PHASES Identification (1960’s – Mid-70’s) 3 Descriptive (1970 – 1980) Prescriptive (1985 – 1995) School District (1985 – Present) Total System Alignment (1995 – Present) Alignment (1995 – Present)

4 Schools were never designed, or even intended, to successfully teach all students a high standards curriculum. 4

5 Your school is perfectly aligned to get the results you are currently getting. 5

6 Assumption You and your colleagues are already doing the best they know to do given the context in which they find themselves. 6

7 Navigating the Perfect Storm 1.Higher Standards 2.Higher Percentage of Challenging Students 3.Fewer Resources 7

8 The Leadership (Change) Challenge Take a “followership” to a place they have never been and are not sure they want to go. 8

9 9 The Three Levers of Power: 1. Sticks 2. Carrots 3. Hugs

10 Different Perspectives on School Improvement 1.People Change 2.Systems Change 3.Planned Change 10

11 Effective Schools Research and Practice 11 WANTED… A Proven System for Action

12 Creating a Common Language Effective Schools 12 Getting Ready for Continuous Improvement

13 13 Definition of an EFFECTIVE School: A school that can, in outcome terms, reflective of its “learning for all” mission, demonstrate the presence of equity in quality.

14 14 Definition of an IMPROVING School: A school that can, in outcome terms, reflective of its “learning for all” mission, demonstrate the increasing presence of equity in quality.

15 Policy Pillars for Public Education in America QUALITY EQUITY 15

16 Policy Pillars for Public Education in America QUALITY EQUITYLevelOfAchievement DistributionOfAchievement 16

17 Searching for Effective Schools Outliers on the High Side Outliers on the High Side Common Characteristics Common Characteristics 17

18 The Correlate of an Effective School An inter-connected array of systems that combine to advance the mission of the school. An inter-connected array of systems that combine to advance the mission of the school. 18

19 19 Trailing Indicators Leading Indicators

20 High Expectations for Success In the effective school there is a climate of expectation in which the staff believe and demonstrate that all students can attain mastery of the essential school skills, and the staff also believe that they have the capability to help all students achieve that mastery. 20

21 21 High Standards High Expectations

22 Mindset* Fixed Intelligence Fixed Intelligence Developing Intelligence Developing Intelligence *Dweck, Carol Mindset: The New Psychology of Success (2006). 22

23 Intelligence and How to Get It* Fluid Intelligence Fluid Intelligence Crystallized Intelligence Crystallized Intelligence *Nisbett, Richard E. Intelligence and How to Get It: Why Schools and Cultures Count (2009). 23

24 24 Expectations = Unwarranted Optimism

25 Strong Instructional Leadership In the effective school the principal acts as an instructional leader and effectively and persistently communicates that mission to the staff, parents, and students. The principal understands and applies the characteristics of instructional effectiveness in the management of the instructional program. 25

26 “Leadership is second only to classroom instruction among all school-related factors that contribute to what students learn at school.” Wahlstrom, Kyla L., et al. Investigating the Links to Improved Student Learning: Executive Summary of Research Findings. (2010) 26

27 27 Authority is delegated from Above Leadership is delegated from Below

28 28 Trustworthy Competent Forward Looking Enthusiasm

29 29 Principal Leader of Followers Principal Leader of Leaders (Engagement Paradigm)

30 Clear and Focused Mission In the effective school there is a clearly articulated school mission through which the staff shares an understanding of and commitment to the instructional goals, priorities, assessment procedures, and accountability. Staff accept responsibility for students’ learning of the school’s essential curricular goals. 30

31 People and Organizations are Always Moving in the Direction of Their Dominate Thought 31

32 32 MISSION NOT a description of Current Reality IS a description of a Preferred Future

33 Learning for ALL Whatever It Takes! NEW MISSION 33

34 Opportunity to Learn/Time on Task In the effective school teachers allocate a significant amount of classroom time to instruction in the essential skills. For a high percentage of this time students are engaged in whole class or large group, teacher-directed, planned learning activities. 34

35 35 Big Issue: School Readiness Prerequisite Knowledge Learning Gaps are First Opportunity Gaps

36 36 Big Problem: Agrarian Calendar Age-based Placement

37 37 Big Opportunity: Disruptive Technology Increased Student Engagement

38 38 Big Idea: Assure Alignment Between Intended CurriculumIntended Curriculum Taught CurriculumTaught Curriculum Tested CurriculumTested Curriculum

39 Frequent Monitoring of Pupil Progress In the effective school student academic progress is measured frequently through a variety of assessment procedures. The results of these assessments are used to improve individual student performance and also to improve the instructional program. 39

40 40 Monitoring SummativeFormative

41 41 Big Idea: FeedbackTimelyExplicit

42 42 Bookends of an Effective System 1.Clear & Focused Mission 2.Frequent Monitoring and Reporting Progress on the Mission

43 Safe and Orderly Environment In the effective school there is an orderly, purposeful, businesslike atmosphere which is free from the threat of physical harm. The school climate is not oppressive and is conducive to teaching and learning. 43

44 44 1.On Duty All the Time, Everywhere Prerequisites 2.Behave with Consistency Enforcing the Rules

45 45 Violence in Schools Among K-12 teachers, percentage who say this occurred in school setting in the last school year ( ): Fights Verbal confrontations Verbal confrontations Student with weapon at school weapon at school Staff abused by student None of the above 76% 65% 36% 28% 16% Source: Zogby for Crisis Prevention Institute survey of K-12 general- education teachers, Sept. 26-Oct. 5, 2009.

46 Positive Home/School Relations In the effective school parents understand and support the school’s basic mission and are given the opportunity to play an important role in helping the school to achieve this mission. 46

47 47 Question: “Can we get bad social service even though we are all good people?” Ron Edmonds

48 The following screen is adapted from: What Works in Schools: Translating Research into Action by Robert J. Marzano ASCD (2003). 48

49 School-level Factors (Ranked) 1.Opportunity to Learn 2.Time 3.Monitoring 4.Pressure to Achieve 5.Parental Involvement 6.School Climate 7.Leadership 8.Cooperation 49

50 The 5 T’s of School Improvement Theories Teams Time Technology Effective SchoolsEffective Schools Systems ThinkingSystems Thinking Continuous ImprovementContinuous Improvement Data GatheringData Gathering Data AnalysisData Analysis Data DisplayData Display Constantly Improving Student Achievement Constantly Improving Student Achievement Team TimeTeam Time Staff DevelopmentStaff Development Study GroupsStudy Groups Real Time DataReal Time Data Just-In-Time InformationJust-In-Time Information Research/Proven PracticesResearch/Proven Practices 50 Tools EmpowermentEmpowerment Consensus BuildingConsensus Building Problem SolvingProblem Solving

51 Reflect Establish the Process: inclusive & collaborative Clarify Mission, Core Values, Core Beliefs Identify Essential StudentLearnings Do StudyPlan 51 Getting Ready for Continuous Improvement:

52 52 Root Cause Analysis The 5 “WHY’s”

53 53 80/20 Rule

54 54 Linking Change Strategies to Student Achievement

55 What would you buy you buy to increase student achievement? Suppose someone gave you an increase in funds. Change Structure Change Time Change Talent Change Materials Change Culture 55

56 Change Structure Change Time Change Talent Change Materials Change Culture How will that translate to: Placing Students at Appropriate Level of Difficulty Placing Students at Appropriate Level of Difficulty Increasing Instructional Time for Learning Increasing Instructional Time for Learning Increasing Student Engagement Increasing Assuring Instructional Alignment Instructional AlignmentAssuring Adding Guided Practice with Immediate Feedback Adding Guided Practice with Immediate Feedback 56

57 Change Structure Change Time Change Talent Change Materials Change Culture How will that then translate to: Placing Students at Appropriate Level of Difficulty Placing Students at Appropriate Level of Difficulty Increasing Instructional Time for Learning Increasing Instructional Time for Learning Increasing Student Engagement Increasing Assuring Instructional Alignment Instructional AlignmentAssuring Adding Guided Practice With Immediate Feedback Adding Guided Practice With Immediate Feedback IncreasedMotivation+IncreasedLearning to equal Increased Student PerformanceIncreasedMotivation+IncreasedLearning to equal Increased Student Performance 57

58 LiteracyCoachLiteracyCoachTeacherTeacher Student Increased Motivation + Increased Learning = Increased Student Performance Increased Student Performance 58

59 Gantt Chart ACTIVITY WHO’S RESPONSIBLESEPOCTNOVDECJANFEBMARAPRMAY Research dropout criteria for at-risk students. Review data on previous dropouts. Get principal approval for criteria. Identify at-risk students. Recruit staff to conduct home visits. Interview interested staff. Train staff for home visits. Conduct home visits. Evaluate home visit program. 59

60 Use the Plan Share the Story Prepare to Adjust 60


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