Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

INHERENT LIMITATIONS OF COMPUTER PROGRAMS CSci 4011.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "INHERENT LIMITATIONS OF COMPUTER PROGRAMS CSci 4011."— Presentation transcript:

1 INHERENT LIMITATIONS OF COMPUTER PROGRAMS CSci 4011

2 Definition: A Turing Machine is a 7-tuple T = (Q, Σ, Γ, , q 0, q accept, q reject ), where: Q is a finite set of states Γ is the tape alphabet, where   Γ and Σ  Γ q 0  Q is the start state Σ is the input alphabet, where   Σ  : Q  Γ → Q  Γ  {L,R} q accept  Q is the accept state q reject  Q is the reject state, and q reject  q accept

3 The language L is Turing-recognizable or recursively enumerable if some TM accepts all and only the strings in L. A language is called decidable or recursive if some TM accepts all the strings in L and rejects all the strings not in L. recursive languages r.e. languages

4 THE CHURCH-TURING THESIS L is recognized by a program for some computer* ⇔ L is recognized by a TM * The computer must be “reasonable”

5 The Church-Turing Thesis is “consistent” with all known “reasonable” computers. SCRATCH: R1: R2:  RAM: 1111… … … #1011# # #...# Programs for a computer have instructions like ADD R1, R2, R3; LOAD R1, R2; STORE R1,R2; MUL R1, R2, R2; BRANCH R1, X;…

6 Programming languages like Java, Python, Scheme, C, … are equivalent to TMs We call such languages Turing complete. Corollary. If two programming languages are Turing complete, then they can recognize exactly the same set of languages.

7 We can encode a TM as a string of 0s and 1s… 0 n 10 m 10 k 10 s 10 t 10 r 10 u 1… n states m tape symbols (first k are input symbols) start state accept state reject state blank symbol 〈 (p,a), (q,b,L) 〉 = 0 p 10 a 10 q 10 b 10

8 Since TMs and other languages are equivalent we can also express TMs as programs. Since programs are strings, we can consider languages whose elements are programs. We let 〈 M 〉 denote the encoding of TM M. Theorem. We can make a Universal TM, a TM that takes any 〈 M 〉 and any string w as input and simulates the computation of M on w.

9 Similarly, we can encode DFAs, NFAs, CFGs, etc into strings of 0s and 1s A DFA = { 〈 B,w 〉 | B is a DFA that accepts string w } A NFA = { 〈 N,w 〉 | N is an NFA that accepts string w } A CFG = { 〈 G,w 〉 | G is a CFG that generates string w } So we can define the following languages:

10 A DFA = { 〈 B,w 〉 | B is a DFA that accepts string w } Theorem: A DFA is decidable Proof Idea: Simulate B on w A CFG = { 〈 G,w 〉 | G is a CFG that generates string w } Theorem: A CFG is decidable Proof Idea: Transform G into CNF. Try all derivations of length 2|w|-1 Corollary: A NFA is decidable

11 E DFA = { 〈 B 〉 | B is a DFA and L(B) = Ø} Theorem: E DFA is decidable Proof Idea: Let B = (Q, ,δ,q 0,F) and L(B)=Ø. 1.Set MARK := {q 0 } 2.Repeat until MARK is unchanged: MARK := MARK ∪ δ(MARK,Σ) 3.If F ∩ MARK = Ø, accept, else reject. ALL DFA = { 〈 B 〉 | B is a DFA and L(B) = Σ*} Theorem: ALL DFA is decidable Proof Idea: If L(B) = Σ* then L(¬B) = Ø

12 INFINITE DFA = { 〈 B 〉 | B is a DFA and L(B) is infinite} Theorem: INFINITE DFA is decidable Proof Idea: Let B = (Q, ,δ,q 0,F). Suppose ∃ w ∈ L(B) : |w| ≥ |Q|. 1.Let C be a DFA for {w : |w| ≥ |Q|}. 2.Build a DFA D for L(C) ∩ L(B). 3.If D ∈ E DFA then reject, else accept. FINITE DFA = { 〈 B 〉 | B is a DFA and L(B) is finite} Corollary: FINITE DFA is decidable

13 The language L is undecidable if there is no TM that decides L. If L is undecidable, then every TM must either: 1. Accept (infinitely many) strings s ∉ L. 2. Reject (infinitely many) strings s ∈ L. 3. Loop forever on (infinitely many) strings.

14 UN DECIDABILITY We will prove that there are some undecidable languages – i.e., problems that a program can’t solve no matter how long it computes. The proof is “simple:” There are more languages than there are Turing Machines.

15 POP QUIZ Let ℕ = {0,1,2,…} be the Natural Numbers. Let = {0,2,4,6,…} be the Even Numbers. Let ℤ = {…,-2,-1,0,1,2,…} be the Integers. Which is biggest, | ℕ |, ||, or | ℤ |?

16 Are there more blue or yellow dots? ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

17 SET THEORY 101 A function ƒ : A → B is: 1-1 (or injective) if onto (or surjective) if bijective if it is 1-1 and onto. ∀ x ∈ A : ƒ(x) is unique. ∀ y ∈ B : y ∈ ƒ(A) 1-1 then |A| |B| onto then |A| |B| bijective then |B| |A|. ƒ can help us count. If ƒ is: ≤ ≥ =

18 COUNTABLE SETS We say a set Y is countable if |Y| ≤ | ℕ |. Some countable sets: = {0,2,4,6,…} = {1,3,5,7,…} SQUARES = {0,1,4,9,16,25…} |POWERS| = |SQUARES| = || = || = | ℕ | POWERS = {1,2,4,8,16,32…} Ø, {0}, {0,1}, {0,1, …, 255}

19 There exists a bijection between ℕ and ℕ ℕ. (0,0) (0,1) (0,2) (0,3) (0,4) … (1,0) (1,1) (1,2) (1,3) (1,4) … (2,0) (2,1) (2,2) (2,3) (2,4) … (3,0) (3,1) (3,2) (3,3) (3,4) … (4,0) (4,1) (4,2) (4,3) (4,4) …

20 {0,1}* is countable { 〈 M 〉 | M is a TM } is countable ℚ + = { p/q | p,q ∈ ℤ + } is countable! Is any set uncountable?

21 Theorem: There is no onto function from the positive integers to the real interval (0,1) 12345:12345: … … … … … : Proof:Suppose ƒ is such a function: [ n-th digit of r ] = if [ n-th digit of f(n) ]  1 2otherwise For all n, ƒ(n)  r

22 The process of constructing a counterexample by “contradicting the diagonal” is called DIAGONALIZATION

23 Prove that |(-1,1)| = |(0,1)| = | ℝ | Prove that |ℝ ℝ| = ℝ Is there a set bigger than ℝ ?

24 Let L be any set and (L) be the power set of L Theorem: There is no onto map from L to (L) Proof: Assume, for a contradiction, that there is an onto map ƒ : L  (L) Let D ƒ = { x  L | x  ƒ(x) } If D ƒ = ƒ(y) then y  D ƒ if and only if y  D ƒ We construct a set D ƒ that cannot be the image, ƒ(y) for any y  L. D ƒ is called the diagonal set for ƒ.

25 How is that diagonalization? x y 1 ∈ f(x)?y 2 ∈ f(x)?y 3 ∈ f(x)?y 4 ∈ f(x)? … y1y1 YNYY y2y2 NYNY y3y3 NNNN y4y4 YNNY  Y Y Y N (y i ∈ D) = Y iff (y i ∈ f(y i )) = N

26 EXAMPLE Let L = {0,1,2}. Then (L) = {Ø, {0}, {1}, {2}, {0,1}, {0,2}, {1,2}, {0,1,2}} Let ƒ(0) = {1}, ƒ(1) = Ø, ƒ(2) = {0,2}. Then: x 0 ∈ ƒ(x)?1 ∈ ƒ(x)?2 ∈ ƒ(x)? 0NYN 1NNN 2YNY D ƒ ={0,1} Characteristic sequence for ƒ(2)={0,2}

27 No matter what, (L) always has more elements than L

28 Not all languages over {0,1} are decidable Turing Machines Strings of 0s and 1s Sets of strings of 0s and 1s Languages over {0,1} L(L)


Download ppt "INHERENT LIMITATIONS OF COMPUTER PROGRAMS CSci 4011."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google