Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Trees & Community Livability Kathleen L. Wolf, Ph.D. Research Social Scientist University of Washington - Forest Resources Kathleen L. Wolf, Ph.D. Research.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Trees & Community Livability Kathleen L. Wolf, Ph.D. Research Social Scientist University of Washington - Forest Resources Kathleen L. Wolf, Ph.D. Research."— Presentation transcript:

1 Trees & Community Livability Kathleen L. Wolf, Ph.D. Research Social Scientist University of Washington - Forest Resources Kathleen L. Wolf, Ph.D. Research Social Scientist University of Washington - Forest Resources

2 Livable? or Lovable!?

3 Our ability to perceive quality in nature begins, as in art, with the pretty. It expands through successive stages of the beautiful, to values as yet uncaptured by language. Aldo Leopold

4 forest “restoration” & schools Parks & People Foundation, Baltimore

5 nature recovery & schools Parks & People Foundation, Baltimore

6 first phase - reading circle Parks & People Foundation, Baltimore

7 forest recovery & schools Parks & People Foundation, Baltimore

8 school asphalt recovery Parks & People Foundation, Baltimore participation - civic ecology

9 daily experiences of nearby nature

10 community gardens - renewal

11 “3rd place” & social cohesion

12 Trees in Communities making them livable AND loveable trees & public health trees & transportation trees & economic value of properties trees & public health trees & transportation trees & economic value of properties

13 Physical Activity & Obesity Nature and Walkable Places majority of Americans not active enough goal-30 minutes per day of moderate activity risk factor for chronic diseases (heart, stroke, cancer, diabetes) significant costs to national health services majority of Americans not active enough goal-30 minutes per day of moderate activity risk factor for chronic diseases (heart, stroke, cancer, diabetes) significant costs to national health services ,000 deaths per year $100 annual billion medical costs (1995) 9.4% of all U.S. medical costs ,000 deaths per year $100 annual billion medical costs (1995) 9.4% of all U.S. medical costs

14 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults 1985 No Data <10% 10%–14% (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

15 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults 1986 No Data <10% 10%–14% (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

16 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults 1987 No Data <10% 10%–14% (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

17 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults 1988 No Data <10% 10%–14% (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

18 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults 1989 No Data <10% 10%–14% (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

19 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults 1990 No Data <10% 0%–14% (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

20 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults 1991 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

21 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults 1992 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

22 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults 1993 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

23 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults 1994 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

24 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults 1995 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

25 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults 1996 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

26 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults 1997 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

27 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults 1998 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥200 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

28 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults 1999 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

29 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults 2000 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

30 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults 2001 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25% (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

31 (*BMI  30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25% (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person) Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults 2002

32 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults 2003 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

33 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults 2004 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25% (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person) Doubling of adult obesity rate since 1980.

34

35

36 Durham, NC

37 parks, open spaces & trails

38 parks, open spaces & and trails

39 walkable neighborhoods

40 make room for pedestrians

41 Trees in Communities making them livable AND loveable trees & public health trees & transportation trees & economic value of properties trees & public health trees & transportation trees & economic value of properties Trees and Traffic Safety, Wolf & Bratton, July 2006, Arboriculture & Urban Forestry funding: US Forest Service, NUCFAC

42 Problem! Drivers run off the road and crash into trees

43

44 U.S. traffic accident rates in 2002 Roadside Trees & Safety Bratton and Wolf, Trans Research Board, 2005 Wolf & Bratton, Arb & Urban Forests, 2006

45 M. Norris, Australia ISA, 2005 Annual Fatality Risks: fatal urban tree crash 1: 100,000

46

47 Behavior & Safe Driving! Crashes occur on weekends, late evening hours Winding rural roads, vehicle leaves road on outside of curves Male traffic fatalities outnumber female 2 to 1 Drunk driving - about 50% of all traffic fatalities Seat belt use reduces risk of death by 42% Travel speed exceeds posted speed - about 30% of fatalities

48 Psychological Traffic Calming “body language of the street” “mental speedbumps” D. Engwicht complete streets home zones complete streets home zones

49

50 Streets are inadequate: dangerous & ugly

51 Streets are inadequate No room for people

52 Complete the Streets! cars/pedestrians/bikes

53 Home Zones (Dutch “woonerf”) integrating the street into everyday life

54 Home Zones traffic calming green streets festival planning play spaces multi-modal transport

55 Trees in Communities making them livable AND loveable trees & public health trees & transportation trees & economic value of properties trees & public health trees & transportation trees & economic value of properties

56 Do property prices “reflect” the value of community trees?

57 Hedonic Analysis statistical test of green characteristics and property market price (linear regression) sales price of properties = property attributes + neighborhood attributes presence of trees & green +

58 Hedonic Analysis s to date

59 verticalforestsmarketvalue?

60 City of Chicago, City Hall roof gardens/ecosystems City of Chicago, City Hall roof gardens/ecosystems

61 Nashville, mixed use bldg roof gardens/ecosystems Nashville, mixed use bldg roof gardens/ecosystems

62 Trees in Communities making them livable AND loveable trees & public health trees & transportation trees & economic value of properties trees & public health trees & transportation trees & economic value of properties

63


Download ppt "Trees & Community Livability Kathleen L. Wolf, Ph.D. Research Social Scientist University of Washington - Forest Resources Kathleen L. Wolf, Ph.D. Research."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google