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A merican C ivicsHOLT HOLT, RINEHART AND WINSTON1 Chapter 10 Electing Leaders Section 1:A Two-Party System Section 2:Political Party Organization Section.

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Presentation on theme: "A merican C ivicsHOLT HOLT, RINEHART AND WINSTON1 Chapter 10 Electing Leaders Section 1:A Two-Party System Section 2:Political Party Organization Section."— Presentation transcript:

1 A merican C ivicsHOLT HOLT, RINEHART AND WINSTON1 Chapter 10 Electing Leaders Section 1:A Two-Party System Section 2:Political Party Organization Section 3:The Right to Vote Section 4:Nominating and Electing Our Leaders

2 A merican C ivicsHOLT HOLT, RINEHART AND WINSTON2 Chapter 10 OBJECTIVES  What is the role of political parties in the United States?  How did political parties develop in the United States?  How do one-party and two-party political systems differ? Section 1:A Two-Party System

3 A merican C ivicsHOLT HOLT, RINEHART AND WINSTON3 Chapter 10 Political parties in the United States:  Way for large groups with similar ideas to get things done  Take positions on public issues and work to pass laws  Allows individuals to have a stronger voice within a group  Parties must compromise and work together Section 1:A Two-Party System

4 A merican C ivicsHOLT HOLT, RINEHART AND WINSTON4 Chapter 10 The development of political parties in the United States:  Federalists—believed in strengthening the central government  Antifederalists (Democratic-Republicans) tried to limit the power of the federal government.  1820s—Andrew Jackson led the Democratic Party; determined the government should represent the “common people”  1854—Republican Party formed by antislavery groups; nominated Abraham Lincoln for president in 1860 Section 1:A Two-Party System

5 A merican C ivicsHOLT HOLT, RINEHART AND WINSTON5 Chapter 10 One-party and two-party political systems:  One-party systems—dictatorships or totalitarian governments; one group or person has power; people do not have essential freedoms  Two-party systems—create stable governments; allow for majority rule; voters have a choice Section 1:A Two-Party System

6 A merican C ivicsHOLT HOLT, RINEHART AND WINSTON6 Chapter 10 OBJECTIVES  What are the committees that help major political parties, and what are their responsibilities?  Where do political parties get their money, and why does Congress regulate political contributions?  How does the Federal Election Campaign Act regulate federal campaigns? Section 2:Political Party Organization

7 A merican C ivicsHOLT HOLT, RINEHART AND WINSTON7 Chapter 10 Party committees and their responsibilities:  National committee—sets dates, rules, and location of national convention; publishes and distributes literature; arranges speakers; aids presidential candidate  State central committees—supervise operations within the states; maintain harmony and organization; raise money and aid candidates  Local committees—conduct campaigns; recommend appointments and candidates; raise money; crucial to party success; precinct captains encourage voters to cast ballots for the party’s candidates Section 2:Political Party Organization

8 A merican C ivicsHOLT HOLT, RINEHART AND WINSTON8 Chapter 10 Money and Regulations  Private contributions make up a large percentage of funds.  Business groups, labor unions and other groups also contribute.  Large fund-raising events are held by each party.  Fear of corruption prompted Congress to regulate the size of donations. Section 2:Political Party Organization

9 A merican C ivicsHOLT HOLT, RINEHART AND WINSTON9 Chapter 10 Federal Election Campaign Act  1972—Federal Election Campaign Act passed to lessen the possibility of corruption  FECA limits size of contributions and requires a report of donors.  Soft money remains difficult to monitor.  The Presidential Election Campaign Fund gives public funds to qualified candidates who can then no longer receive private donations. Section 2:Political Party Organization

10 A merican C ivicsHOLT HOLT, RINEHART AND WINSTON10 Chapter 10 OBJECTIVES  Who can vote in U.S. elections, and how is this right protected?  What is the difference in primary elections and general elections?  How has the voting process changed over the years? Section 3:The Right to Vote

11 A merican C ivicsHOLT HOLT, RINEHART AND WINSTON11 Chapter 10 Voting Rights in U.S. Elections  All U.S. citizens over the age of 18 are eligible to vote.  States cannot deny the right to vote based on race, color, or sex.  The Voting Rights Act protects voters’ rights.  Disqualified voters include prison inmates, mentally incompetent persons, election-law violators, and persons with no established residence.  Voters must register prior to an election. Section 3:The Right to Vote

12 A merican C ivicsHOLT HOLT, RINEHART AND WINSTON12 Chapter 10 Primary Elections  Allows registered voters to choose the party candidates  Closed primary: only party members can vote for each party’s candidate  Open primary: voters can vote for either party’s candidates Section 3:The Right to Vote

13 A merican C ivicsHOLT HOLT, RINEHART AND WINSTON13 Chapter 10 General Elections  Registered voters choose the leaders.  Organizations, newspapers, radio, television, and magazines help inform voters. Section 3:The Right to Vote

14 A merican C ivicsHOLT HOLT, RINEHART AND WINSTON14 Chapter 10 Changes in the voting process:  Early 1800s—voting was by voice  1888—secret ballots adopted to ensure fairness and honesty  1960s—Mechanical lever machines were most common  Punchcards, mark-sense, and direct recording electronic systems are other paper-ballot alternatives. Section 3:The Right to Vote

15 A merican C ivicsHOLT HOLT, RINEHART AND WINSTON15 Chapter 10 OBJECTIVES  What is the purpose of national nominating conventions, and how are convention delegates chosen?  What is the nomination process at the national conventions?  What are some methods of presidential campaigning?  What is the main purpose of the electoral college? Section 4:Nominating and Electing Our Leaders

16 A merican C ivicsHOLT HOLT, RINEHART AND WINSTON16 Chapter 10 National nominating conventions and choosing delegates:  Delegates are elected in primaries or selected by party leaders.  Additional delegates are determined by different formulas.  Parties agree on a platform and select a candidate at national conventions.  Conventions are huge, televised events intended to spread the party’s message to voters. Section 4:Nominating and Electing Our Leaders

17 A merican C ivicsHOLT HOLT, RINEHART AND WINSTON17 Chapter 10 The nomination process at the national conventions:  State-by-state roll call and nominating speeches for candidates  Favorite sons or daughters nominated to honor or delay decision  Balloting of the delegates ensues until candidate is chosen  Delegates nominate the vice president based on ability win votes  Presidential candidates have the strongest voice regarding the choice for vice president. Section 4:Nominating and Electing Our Leaders

18 A merican C ivicsHOLT HOLT, RINEHART AND WINSTON18 Chapter 10 Methods of presidential campaigning:  Television and other media advertise candidates’ views.  Presidential debates (televised since 1960s)  Computers offer online campaigning.  Personal-appearance tours  Telephone campaigning urges citizens to vote. Section 4:Nominating and Electing Our Leaders

19 A merican C ivicsHOLT HOLT, RINEHART AND WINSTON19 Chapter 10 The main purpose of the electoral college:  Electors cast the official votes for presidency based on the popular vote in each state.  The framers of the Constitution worried citizens would not be able to choose wise leaders.  The relevancy of the electoral college today is in debate. Section 4:Nominating and Electing Our Leaders


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