Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Creating an Oasis: A Brief Summary of Utah Foundation’s Reports on Water Development, Pricing and Consumption in Utah.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Creating an Oasis: A Brief Summary of Utah Foundation’s Reports on Water Development, Pricing and Consumption in Utah."— Presentation transcript:

1 Creating an Oasis: A Brief Summary of Utah Foundation’s Reports on Water Development, Pricing and Consumption in Utah

2 Creating an Oasis: Part One The History of Water Development in Utah

3 Creating an Oasis: Water Development in Utah The history of Utah’s water develop is unique because: The history of Utah’s water develop is unique because: The ‘first in time, first in right’ doctrine of western water development was not strictly adhered to The ‘first in time, first in right’ doctrine of western water development was not strictly adhered to Water development was meant for the common good Water development was meant for the common good Water development was managed first by the LDS church and this created the precedent for future government management Water development was managed first by the LDS church and this created the precedent for future government management

4 Creating an Oasis: Water Development in Utah The period of saw the growth in efforts to develop water for profit The period of saw the growth in efforts to develop water for profit The 1880 act allowing holders of water rights to sell the land and water separate of each other The 1880 act allowing holders of water rights to sell the land and water separate of each other The 1894 enabling act for the state of Utah The 1894 enabling act for the state of Utah The Utah constitution and article XVII The Utah constitution and article XVII

5 Creating an Oasis: Water Development in Utah Water development as a public endeavor Water development as a public endeavor The Reclamation Act of 1902 The Reclamation Act of 1902 Arid Land Reclamation Fund Commission Arid Land Reclamation Fund Commission Utah water legislation in 1903 Utah water legislation in 1903 Metropolitan Water District Act and the Water Conservancy District Act Metropolitan Water District Act and the Water Conservancy District Act Deer Creek Reservoir, the people and the Bureau of Reclamation Deer Creek Reservoir, the people and the Bureau of Reclamation

6 Creating an Oasis: Water Development in Utah Where we are today Where we are today Our history has been one of government and public institution involvement from the beginning Our history has been one of government and public institution involvement from the beginning This attitude has reinforced the idea that water in Utah is a public good, one that all citizens must have access to, for as low a cost as possible This attitude has reinforced the idea that water in Utah is a public good, one that all citizens must have access to, for as low a cost as possible It has also reinforced the use of property and sales tax funds within the general operating revenues of the water districts It has also reinforced the use of property and sales tax funds within the general operating revenues of the water districts

7 Creating an Oasis: Water Development in Utah Property Taxes account for a significant portion of water districts’ revenue Property Taxes account for a significant portion of water districts’ revenue Financing for water development projects relies mainly on Revenue Bonds. Revenue Bonds are backed by water sales revenue only Financing for water development projects relies mainly on Revenue Bonds. Revenue Bonds are backed by water sales revenue only

8 Creating an Oasis: Water Development in Utah

9

10

11 Creating an Oasis Part Two Water Consumption, Pricing and Conservation in Utah

12 Creating an Oasis: Water Consumption in Utah

13

14 Creating an Oasis: Elasticity of Consumption and Population Growth in Utah

15 Creating an Oasis: Concerns About Consumption and Pricing Governor’s Council of Economic Advisors Governor’s Council of Economic Advisors Utah currently has high per capita water use and low water rates Utah currently has high per capita water use and low water rates Based on present demand and pricing practices, population and economic growth will continue to put pressure on the state’s water supply Based on present demand and pricing practices, population and economic growth will continue to put pressure on the state’s water supply The most accessible and least costly sources of water have already been developed The most accessible and least costly sources of water have already been developed Federal funds for new water development are dwindling & will continue to decline, if not disappear Federal funds for new water development are dwindling & will continue to decline, if not disappear Future water development will almost assuredly be funded from state and local revenue sources Future water development will almost assuredly be funded from state and local revenue sources

16 Creating an Oasis: Water Pricing in Utah

17 Creating an Oasis: Water Funding Sources

18 Creating an Oasis: Property Tax Revenue Utah is unique in the West, as property tax revenue to water districts go into the general operating funds of the districts Utah is unique in the West, as property tax revenue to water districts go into the general operating funds of the districts In other states, if a property tax is levied, it is reserved for development purposes In other states, if a property tax is levied, it is reserved for development purposes California and Denver, Colorado California and Denver, Colorado

19 Creating an Oasis Conclusion

20 Utah water development has a unique history Utah water development has a unique history Because of that history, water is paid for from a variety of sources, including billing and property taxes Because of that history, water is paid for from a variety of sources, including billing and property taxes Water prices in Utah are some of the lowest in the West and Utah is the second highest per capita consumer Water prices in Utah are some of the lowest in the West and Utah is the second highest per capita consumer Water prices are moderately inelastic, if quality is not an issue, then consumers do not usually respond to price increases in the short run Water prices are moderately inelastic, if quality is not an issue, then consumers do not usually respond to price increases in the short run If pricing was successful in causing consumers to conserve water, residential water accounts for only 7.8 percent of the total water used in the state, and could only have a nominal effect on overall water use If pricing was successful in causing consumers to conserve water, residential water accounts for only 7.8 percent of the total water used in the state, and could only have a nominal effect on overall water use


Download ppt "Creating an Oasis: A Brief Summary of Utah Foundation’s Reports on Water Development, Pricing and Consumption in Utah."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google