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Presented By Jack Ghazalian, DG, CSG, GG, RGA GEMSTONES THROUGH TIME: A GLIMPSE AT PERIOD JEWELRY.

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Presentation on theme: "Presented By Jack Ghazalian, DG, CSG, GG, RGA GEMSTONES THROUGH TIME: A GLIMPSE AT PERIOD JEWELRY."— Presentation transcript:

1 Presented By Jack Ghazalian, DG, CSG, GG, RGA GEMSTONES THROUGH TIME: A GLIMPSE AT PERIOD JEWELRY

2 A fascinating journey into the history of gemstones, from ancient civilization to the discovery of the lapidary and how gemstones became part of finished jewelry for personal adornment as well as a signifier of some affiliation, wealth, power and/or status symbol. An overview on gemstones in period jewelry, these eras include Victorian, Art Nouveau, Edwardian, Art Deco and contemporary jewelry

3 SHELLS The First Known in jewelry 80,000 to over 100,000 thousand years ago Mother-of-Pearl Watch Dials Today Shell Cameo Prehistoric Times The shells above are not true historical shells, they are for demonstration only

4 BRIEF HISTORY 80.000 - 100.000 BC - Decorative sea shell beads found in the archeological digs in Morocco and various other parts in Africa. 40.000 BC - Beads made from bone and animal teeth found in France. 30.000 BC - Fossilized shells and ivory beads found in what is now known as Czech Republic. 4500 BC – Turkey, ancient Greece (Macedonia) and Albania produced the oldest known objects made from gold. 5000- 20 BC - Copper begin to be used in jewelry, and gold arrives in Egypt around 4000 BC as the Egyptians started to make jewelry designs based on scarab beetles, winged birds, tigers and antelopes. Popular gemstones of that time were amethyst, carnelian, chalcedony, lapis lazuli and turquoise. 1400 - 50BC - Greek jewelry was made in the style of animals and shells using amethysts, pearls, chalcedony, carnelian, garnet and emeralds. 500 BC - 500 AD - Ancient Rome preferred seal-rings, brooches, amulets and talismans with the designs of animals and snakes. Most popular gemstones were sapphires, emeralds, pearls, amber, garnets and diamonds. 1300 -1840 - Arrival of Renaissance and Georgian time period brought rise of jewelry use in entire Europe. Necklaces (single or multi strand), earrings (ordinary or with chandeliers), and many other designs were decorated with the images of animals. Intricately designed gemstones became very popular to the point that diamond jewelry became commonly used as a part of evening attire. 1837 - 1901 - Reign of English Queen Victoria had a profound effect on fashion and jewelry tastes in Europe. Early 1900s - These years were for the Art Nouveau and Edwardian jewelry. 1915 - 1940 – The Art Deco was introduced as a jewelry of vibrant colors with geometrical shapes, abstract designs. It also popularized wearing of wristwatches. 1939 - 1949 - Because of influence of World War II and widespread embargoes on gemstones, popular jewelry shifted to the more metal based designs adorned with patriotic motifs set with inexpensive and synthetic gemstones. 1950s - Post war years saw the return of brightly colored jewelry, heavy use of rhinestones and big beads. Diamonds solidified its spot as the most popular gemstone.

5 The Two Photos Above Are Courtesy of DANHOV

6 JEWELRY & GEMSTONES As far as we have traced the history of jewelry making, we know that it started in Egypt approximately 5000 years ago. Egyptian designs were very common in Phoenician jewelry. Also, ancient Turkish designs were influenced in Persian jewelry suggest that trade between the Middle East and Europe was very common. Emeralds, sapphires and rubies were the three main precious gemstones in the Middle East, and some historians report that the Egyptians actually mined emeralds around 5500 years ago. Turquoise has a long history in jewelry. The Egyptians use to grind it into powder and used it as a unique blue eye shadow. The Egyptians also used Lapis, combining it with gold to adorn the tombs of the pharaohs. Cleopatra used powdered Lapis as a blue eye shadow. But the scarcity of the mineral drove the Egyptians to seek the rich blue color through chemistry. By heating together limestone, sand and copper into the chemical compound calcium copper silicate, they invented the richly saturated royal-turquoise pigment called the Egyptian blue. Afterwards the Mesopotamians, the Persians, the Greeks and the Romans, who built factories strictly to create the royal blue pigment.

7 THE HISTORY OF LAPIDARY The history of lapidary is not recent nor was learned overnight, it goes back 1000s of years. Took many and countless lifetimes to achieve the level we are in today. In prehistoric times, men hammered out their tools of stones by striking one stone against another and formed the shapes which they wanted to achieve in a painstaking slow process. No machines of any type were available and as we started to learn that some stones are harder than other stones. Eventually drilling was discovered, and ultimately experimentation demonstrated that carefully breaking, bruting and shaping a gem through rubbing against another harder mineral type. The slow, tedious practice helped shape a gem until more refined techniques were learned over time. Amber is one of the earliest stones to be used in jewelry. It is lightweight, easily drilled, and features a pleasing warm color.

8 An understanding of cultural color and symbolism is essential to anyone who wants to better understand colors in jewelry and their true meaning to certain countries and societies. These associations with color have been a huge part of many cultures for centuries and you must be aware of both the positive and the negative implications of using particular colors in certain jewelry designs made for different societies. Color meanings, symbolically and emotionally, can vary widely from culture to culture and person to person. That's because how we react to a particular red or yellow has a lot to do with how we've been programmed by our culture and our personal past experiences. COLOR!! WHAT IS COLOR!! WHAT COLOR MEANS TO US White Purity, simplicity, cleanliness, peace, truth, glory, humility, innocence, marriage (Western cultures) & spiritual strength Some Cultures : Eastern cultures - mourning, death. Japan - white carnations signify death. United States - purity (used in weddings). Red Excitement, energy, passion, desire, movement, speed, strength, power, heat, love, all things intense and passionate. Negative: aggression, danger, fire, blood, war, violence, lust, stop, agitated. Some Cultures : China - symbol of celebration and luck, used in many cultural ceremonies that range from funerals to weddings. India - color of purity (used in wedding outfits). United States - Christmas color when combined with green, Valentine’s Day when combined with pink, indicates stop (danger) at traffic lights. Eastern cultures - signifies joy when combined with white.

9 COLOR!! WHAT IS COLOR!! WHAT COLOR MEANS TO US Blue Peace, tranquility,, devotion, sincerity, honor, loyalty, sky, water, ice, coolness, appetite suppressant, acceptance Negative: depression, obscenity, fear, coldness, and passivity. Some Cultures : China - associated with immortality. Hindus - the color of Krishna. Jews - holiness. Middle East - protective color Green Nature, environment, healthy, calming, good luck, prosperity, spring, money, hope, soothing. Some Cultures : China - studies indicate this is not a good color choice for packaging, green hats mean a man's wife is cheating on him. France - studies indicate this is not a good color choice for packaging. India - the color of Islam. Ireland - religious significance (Catholic). Some tropical countries - associated with danger United States - indicates go (safe) at traffic lights, environmental awareness, St. Patrick's Day Purple Royalty, piety, sanctity, sentimentality, spirituality, nobility, ceremony, power, wisdom, enlightenment, sophistication, respect and religion. Some Cultures : Western cultures – royalty, purple velvet

10 Medieval Jewelry Georgian Jewelry Renaissance Jewelry Victorian JewelryEdwardian Jewelry 190-1915 Art Nouveau Art Deco

11 Medieval Jewelry The jewelry worn in medieval Europe reflected an intensely hierarchical and status-conscious society. Royalty and the nobility wore gold, silver and precious gems. Humbler ranks wore base metals, such as copper. Until the late 14th century, gems were usually polished rather than cut. Size and lustrous color determined their value. Enamels allowed goldsmiths to color their designs on jewelry. They used a range of techniques to create effects never since surpassed. A large proportion of gold used in late medieval production was recycled gold: goldsmiths used ancient coins, jewelry, or other gold objects as their raw material. A significant quantity of gold was mined, especially in Bohemia and Hungary. Precious stones were acquired almost exclusively from long-distance trade. Among the most frequently used stones, rubies, sapphires, emeralds, turquoises, and diamonds came mainly from the East: rubies were brought from India and Ceylon, sapphires from Ceylon, Arabia, and Persia, emeralds from Egypt, turquoises from Persia and Tibet, and diamonds from India and Central Africa. Europe also produced a variety of gems and semi-precious stones in the later Middle Ages. Byzantium stone-carving remained a living tradition throughout the Middle Ages. Byzantine carved stones were eagerly imported to the West. Other raw materials for the decoration of jewelry included freshwater pearls from Scotland, mother-of-pearl, amber found in great quantities along the Baltic coast, jet mainly from England and Spain, and coral from the Mediterranean coast in North Africa. Some jewels have cryptic or magical inscriptions, believed to protect the wearer

12 Renaissance Jewelry The "Renaissance" period, meaning "rebirth" in French As the acquisition of wealth came into vogue in Europe society, the conspicuous consumption of luxury goods became the norm. Jewelry had a dual function: it was a means of demonstrating one's station in life, and it was a portable way of concentrating wealth in case there was a sudden relapse into the Dark Ages. It was during this period in the mid 1300s that a new gemstone, diamonds, were being added to the list of jewels that were making their way along the Silk Road from India's Golconda diamond mines, and Borneo's Landak diamond fields. These new colorless stones were incredibly hard, and as such, a new gem faceting technology was required to cut and polish diamonds into refined gems, suitable for the jewelry of the period. At the height of the Renaissance the cities of Amsterdam and Antwerp became the hubs of the gem-cutting trade. Renaissance goldsmiths such as Cellini had a great appreciation for the craftsmanship and motifs of ancient Etruscan and Mycenae artisans, and there was a good amount of recycling taking place during this era. In his manuscript entitled "La vita Benvenuto Cellini scritta da lui medesimo" (My Life) Cellini recounts purchasing agates, carnelians, and sardonyx cameos, as well as precious gems such as emeralds, rubies and sapphires from peasant farmers who happened upon the treasures while digging in the fields. At the height of his career, Cellini became the court jeweler for the King of France, Francis I (1494—1547), at Fontainebleau and in Paris, returning to Florence shortly before his death in 1571. Rings were a popular jewelry accessory during the Renaissance, and it was not uncommon for both men and women to wear a ring on each of the ten fingers, as well as multiple rings on each finger. There were rings that had a religious or Ecclesiastical function such as the "Papal ring" or the "decade ring," which served as a miniature rosary. There were rings to express friendship or love such as the "fede ring" (fidelity ring), the "faith ring," the "posy ring," or the Irish "Claddagh ring." There were also functional rings such as the "signet" or signature ring and the "Venitian poison ring" to dispense with a little revenge.

13 Georgian Jewelry Starting at roughly the same time as the Industrial Revolution, the Georgian period was defined by the rule of the English kings Georg Ludwig George I (1660—1727) through king George Augustus Frederick George IV (1762—1830), as well as the American and French revolutions. This period was distinguished by its air of opulence and self indulgence, with king George William Frederick George III (1738—1820), also known as the porphyria-stricken "Mad King George," setting the tone. Starting with the ornate Rococo style of the early Georgian period, motifs transitioned from Gothic Revival during the mid-Georgian era, to Neoclassical during the transitional 'Regent period' of George IV. Popular jewelry styles of the period were both elaborate and intricate, forming ornate arrangements such as 'chandelier' style earrings, rivière necklaces' with their "flowing river" of diamonds, and multi- strand festoons or three-strand en esclavage necklaces' forming concentric rings. In keeping with the excesses of the times, diamonds were a favorite gemstone of the early Georgian Era. Gemstones were used in ornate repoussé settings, forming a raised metal pattern by working from the back side of the piece

14 Victorian Jewelry Queen Victorian became Queen in 1830 at a very young age. This was a woman who loved jewelry. She designed it, wore it, and gave it as gifts through the rise of British Global Empire, the inception of the industrial revolution, and the reaction to mass production that gave birth to the Arts and Crafts movement. During the early period, romantic and symbolic pieces were most favored and often included motifs of hearts, anchors, snakes and crosses. Also less expensive gems including garnets, amethyst, coral turquoise and seed pearls were highly favored. Early Victorian Period Jewelry Romantic Period circa 1837-1860 Grand (1861-1885)Jewelry from this period was often dramatic and heavy and included re-interpretations of many ancient, renaissance and gothic patterns and styles. Gold was most often used together with colored gemstones and enamel. In 1861, Prince Albert died, and again Queen Victoria influenced the direction of jewelry design and production. She went into permanent mourning-only wearing black clothing and black jewelry for the rest of her life. For several years all of England followed her example. Late or Aesthetic (1880 to 1901) The jewelry of the late Victorian period once again returned to romanticism with more delicate and whimsical motifs such as stars, crescents moons, reptiles and insects. The discovery of the diamond mines in South Africa let to the use of old mine cut, rose cut and cushion cut diamonds.

15 Art Nouveau The Art Nouveau style caused a dramatic shift in jewelry design, reaching a peak around 1900 when it triumphed at the Paris International Exhibition. The "Art Nouveau" ("new art") movement was one of the first departures from classical art and design, towards a new modernism. This avant-garde movement occurred during what was known in France as the "La Belle Époque" period, or "beautiful era" of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Design motifs of the Art Nouveau focused heavily on the themes of nature, fantasy, and the female form, with sensual flowing shapes that simulated the organic growth that would be reminiscent of the primeval Garden of Eden. Exotic floral motifs with animals, birds, butterflies, dragonflies, peacock feathers and marsh plants were incorporated with graceful feminine imagery or fairies and mermaids, complete with their long manes of twisting hair. However, the style's radical look was not for everyone or for every occasion. Superb diamond jewelry was made in the 'garland style', a highly creative re-interpretation of 18th- and early 19th-century designs. Art Nouveau jewelry like René Lalique also distanced themselves from conventional precious stones and put greater emphasis on the subtle effects of materials such as glass, horn and enamel. Enameling or plique à jour ("open to light") were popular jewelry techniques during the Art Nouveau period, and the "craft" of jewelry design and metal-working was reborn in the elaborate and imaginative creations of the time. Jewelry designers such as Georges Fouquet and Lucien Gautrait, as well as glass designers Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848—1933) and René Jules Lalique (1860—1945) combined Japanese motifs with popular natural elements to create elaborate Art Nouveau jewelry designs.

16 Edwardian Jewelry This was the first time jewelry was made to be worn at night. Although Edward VII died in 1910, the “Edwardian” style continued until the outbreak of the war. Delicate and elaborate filigree work with platinum and platinum over gold was being used. White gold was being commercially used by the end of the era. Millegrain accents, natural pearls, guilloché, lace style pins, ribbon wrist watches, calibré and cushion cuts, rectangular shaped mounts, foliate, swag, demantoid garnets, natural pearls, peridot, spinel, tourmaline, Ceylon sapphires and moonstones were all popular. World War I put an abrupt end to the light-hearted Edwardian spirit. Life changed overnight and jewelry all but disappeared, either hidden away in secure vaults or sold. Precious metal became scarce and platinum, which was used in the manufacture of armaments, disappeared almost entirely from the market!

17 Art Deco The Art Deco was founded by members of the French artists' collective known as the La Société des artistes décorateurs, following the Paris Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels, held in 1925. The Art Deco style is probable one of the easiest artistic styles to recognize, with its modern ultra clean lines, and its trapezoidal shapes, stepped edges, and arced corners. The name "Art Deco" refers to the movement's effect on the "decorative arts," meaning the more commercial and utilitarian artistic disciplines of architecture, graphic arts, and industrial design, but the name was also used in reference to the "fine arts." As a stylistic motif, Art Deco managed to permeate every aspect daily life, from fashion, to consumer products, to film. Of course, jewelry was no exception, and the Art Deco movement had a profound effect on jewelry design motifs of the period. Because the Art Deco movement was basically an "industrial-age" art movement, white metals such as platinum, palladium and rhodium were commonly used in jewelry fabrication—along with white gold and ubiquitous metals such as sliver, brass and copper—to lend a more contemporary look. American jewelry designers like Harry Winston and Tiffany & Co. became known for their iconic Art Deco style. Notable influential jewelers quickly adapted to the Egyptian designs and popularized them around the world. Entire scenes of ancient Egyptian life played out over the jewelry designs, rendered in new color combinations of lapis lazuli, turquoise and cornelian. Clips, straight line, eternity bands, enameled borders, and vanity cases were all considered stylish. In Europe, designers like Cartier, the House of Mauboussin, and Van Cleef & Arpels were at the forefront of the Art Deco jewelry movement.

18 POPE PAUL VI JEWELRY 1963-1979 Courtesy of M.S. Rau Antiques, New Orleans The Cross is 7" length x 4" wide

19 POPE PAUL VI JEWELRY 1963-1979 Courtesy of M.S. Rau Antiques, New Orleans This exquisite cross is perhaps one of the most exceptional historical and significant jeweled treasures we have ever had the opportunity to offer. Its story is equally fascinating, as it was a gift to the United Nations in 1965 from Pope Paul VI. Intricately carved in 18 carat yellow gold with Colombian emeralds inlaid, the cross boasts over sixty carats in gems, with several magnificent Old European cut white diamonds, including an 8.66 carat, a 7.75 carat, four 5-6 carat stones and numerous 3 to 4 carat stones. The clarity of these resplendent gems ranges from VVS to VS. This amazing work of art is engraved with the Christian Chi Rho symbol, indicating that this cross was almost certainly made by Vatican jewelers in the early 1900's with gemstones from the Vatican's own collection. It also bears the stamp of "Cassio," which refers to Cassio Studios, one of the artisan ateliers at the service of the Vatican. When Paul VI was invited to be the first Pontiff ever to address the United Nations, he gave this cross with the hopes that the proceeds from its sale at auction would contribute to the UN's efforts to end human suffering. Being born into a wealthy upper class family, Pope Paul VI concerned his papacy with winning back the working class and preached the social message of the Gospel, which he accomplished with this generous gesture on behalf of the Catholic Church. The auction took two years to prepare and was handled by Parke-Bernet, the nation's largest fine art auction house until it was acquired by Sotheby's in the late 1960's. An 8-page brochure about this cross, and this incredible ring also given by Paul VI, was printed for this unusual sale which took place in November, 1967. Chicago jeweler Harry Levinson bought both pieces of jewelry for $64,000 and the entire amount was divided between four UN agencies. After that, the two pieces of jewelry were bought and sold several times. At one point they were even owned by renowned daredevil Evel Knievel. Before he was Pope Paul VI, Giovanni Battista Montini was assigned to the secretary of state in Rome where he became the right-hand man of the future Pope Pius XII who was at that time Cardinal. Their close friendship and mutual support continued for many years and it was either during this time or during the reign of Pope John XXIII that the cross was gifted to Montini. This exquisite treasure is without question the most significant Papal jewelry items ever to come on the market. The piece is not only historically important, it is also hand crafted with the finest artistry. Here is an amazing rare opportunity to own an incredible piece of jewelry with a noteworthy history. Circa 1920 7" length x 4" wide Provenance: Pope Pius XII Pope Paul VI United Nations, 1965 (Secretary General U Thant) Parke Bernet Galleries Harry Levinson, November 1967 Evil Kneivel Private Collection Alan Perry Private Collection, 2011

20 POPE PAUL VI JEWELRY 1963-1979 Courtesy of M.S. Rau Antiques, New Orleans This magnificent ring is perhaps one of the most significant jeweled treasures we have ever had the opportunity to offer. Its story is equally fascinating, as it was a gift to the United Nations in 1965 from Pope Paul VI. The ring is hand-crafted of platinum with an (approximately) 13.5 carat Old European cut diamond at its center, surrounded by a halo of 14 shimmering white diamonds, with additional diamonds and red rubies along the shank. This work of art is engraved with the Christian Chi Rho symbol, indicating that it was almost certainly made by Vatican jewelers in the early 1900's with gemstones from the Vatican's own collection. When Paul VI was invited to be the first Pontiff ever to address the United Nations, he gave this cross with the hopes that the proceeds from its sale at auction would contribute to the UN's efforts to end human suffering. Being born into a wealthy upper class family, Pope Paul VI concerned his papacy with winning back the working class and preached the social message of the Gospel, which he accomplished with this generous gesture on behalf of the Catholic Church. The auction took two years to prepare and was handled by Parke-Bernet, the nation's largest fine art auction house until it was acquired by Sotheby's in the late 1960's. An 8-page brochure about this ring, along with this incredible cross also given by Paul VI, was printed for this unusual sale which took place in November, 1967. Chicago jeweler Harry Levinson bought both pieces of jewelry for $64,000 and the entire amount was divided between four UN agencies. After that, the two pieces of jewelry were bought and sold several times. At one point they were even owned by renowned daredevil Evel Knievel. Before he was Pope Paul VI, Giovanni Battista Montini was assigned to the secretary of state in Rome where he became the right-hand man of the future Pope Pius XII who was at that time Cardinal. Their close friendship and mutual support continued for many years and it was either during this time or during the reign of Pope John XXIII that the cross and ring were gifted to Montini. This exquisite treasure is without question one of the most significant Papal jewelry items ever to come on the market. The piece is not only historically important, but it is also hand crafted with the finest artistry. Here is an amazing rare opportunity to own an incredible piece of jewelry with a noteworthy history. Circa 1920 Provenance: Pope Pius XII Pope Paul VI United Nations (Secretary General U Thant) Parke Bernet Galleries Harry Levinson Evil Knievel Private Collection Alan Perry

21 POPE PAUL VI JEWELRY 1963-1979 Courtesy of M.S. Rau Antiques, New Orleans This amazing work of art is engraved with the Christian Chi Rho symbol, indicating that this cross was almost certainly made by Vatican jewelers in the early 1900's with gemstones from the Vatican's own collection. It also bears the stamp of "Cassio," which refers to Cassio Studios, one of the artisan ateliers at the service of the Vatican.

22 Courtesy of Zorab Creation With 2014 being The Year of the Horse, horse jewelry is very much in trend. These two black and white horse rings, each one taking between 1.5 and 2 month to finish. The highlight of these pieces is in the detail – from the mane to the stones on the face of the horse, the cutting, setting, and laser welding of each individual stone is quite difficult and time consuming. Remarkable skills are required to craft such an exquisite jewelry design WHY ONLY A HANDFUL OF MANUFACTURERS TODAY WOULD INVEST IN THE TRUE ART OF JEWELRY MAKING

23 Courtesy of Zorab Creation This Phoenix Bangle contains over 1,383 gemstones – 1,314 pave set and 69 bezel set. This piece weighs 197.5 grams. Because of the design of this bangle, the jeweler had to create a solution to wrap the bangle around a variety of wrist sizes while keeping the structure and integrity of the piece intact. They ended up designing a difficult master mold that had the entire tail made of small joints to create flexibility and to ensure an elegant fit on any sized wrist. In order to create the intricate texture and beauty of a snake, this particular Bangle is set with 174 black diamonds, 81 black Spinels, along with 885 white diamonds. The signature of any snake item is in the texture of the snakeskin, so to recreate it, the designers decided to individually cut and set 81 black Spinel gemstones, which ended up being the most challenging and time consuming part of the process.

24 Courtesy of DANHOV No molds are used on the rings on the right! This preserves the quality and unique intricacies of the ring that only handmade and hand-assembled pieces can show The handmade ring making process is eco-friendly; avoiding the harsh chemicals and large machinery used in traditional molding and manufacturing processes

25 TECHNOLOGY TODAY! Courtesy of DANHOV Earlier times, designing jewelry was very tedious and slow process, furthermore, it was too difficult to achieve perfection. With CAD technology, speed, detailing, and accuracy can be achieved in a very short time, and converted into a 3D wax model. Also, designs can be achieved by using CAD, and the jeweler using his or her own skills will create the jewelry using the exact specifications all BY HAND Also, designs can be achieved by using CAD, and the jeweler using his or her own skills will create the jewelry using the exact specifications all BY HAND

26 Jack Ghazalian

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28 My story Celebrating 34 years in the jewelry industry, I started at a very young age of 14, worked after school as an apprentice at my brother-in-law’s family owned factory where I learned machine manufacturing of jewelry. I also became a diamond setter which I enjoyed the art of pave-setting for over five years. As I grew older, I eventually started full time in the jewelry industry. In 1992, I earned my Graduate Gemologist degree; I later became an Instructor at GIA which was back in Santa Monica, CA. In the 1990s, I traveled around the world in search of amazing and rare gems, and as a consultant and gemological trainer to many large and reputable international companies. Switzerland, Geneva and Lausanne – Monaco, Monte Carlo – Italy, Venice, Vicenza, Florence, Milan and Rome – Greece, Athens – UAE, Dubai & Abu Dhabi – Saudi Arabia, Jeddah, Riyadh – Muscat, Oman – Qatar, Doha – Japan, Tokyo. My career expanded further towards internationally based establishments as a world renowned gemologist, which gave me the honor to accomplish extraordinary pieces with extremely rare gems to the King of Saudi Arabia and the Sultan of Brunei with Mouawad. In 1997, I was a brand ambassador to Bulgari International. In 2003 I was a jeweler to celebrities with Mouawad, a partnership with Victoria Secret’s multi-million dollar Fantasy Bra and the branding of Heidi Klum’s jewelry collection. Currently have my office in Newport Beach, CA. called Gemological Insurance Appraisers and Rodriguez & Sons Estate Jewelers Diploma Member of the Gemological Institute of America Alumni Association (GIA) Diplomate by the International School of Gemology as a Registered Gemologist Appraiser Proud Member of the San Diego & Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce Lifetime Achievements: Twenty Eight (28) Diplomas and Certificates Multi-lingual, 5 languages TO ACHIEVE EXTRAORDINARY RESULTS YOU HAVE TO BE AN EXTRAORDINARY THINKER

29 Presented By Jack Ghazalian, DG, CSG, GG, RGA - (714) 290 -7200 R egisteredAppraiser@gmail.com A WORLD RENOWNED GEMOLOGIST


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