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Lt Col Thyra A. Bishop 142 Fighter Wing, Oregon Air National Guard Lt Col Matthew Doggett 123 Weather Flight, Oregon Air National Guard Air Force AFSC.

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Presentation on theme: "Lt Col Thyra A. Bishop 142 Fighter Wing, Oregon Air National Guard Lt Col Matthew Doggett 123 Weather Flight, Oregon Air National Guard Air Force AFSC."— Presentation transcript:

1 Lt Col Thyra A. Bishop 142 Fighter Wing, Oregon Air National Guard Lt Col Matthew Doggett 123 Weather Flight, Oregon Air National Guard Air Force AFSC 15W Weather

2 Capt Nathan Nylander Nylander, 35, was a meteorologist with D-M's 25th Operational Weather Squadron. On the day of the shooting, he was in a conference room with other Air Force and Afghan personnel when a gunman opened fire. Nylander evacuated the room, then went into a hallway, where he and another officer fired their pistols at the gunman. Nylander believed the assailant was incapacitated by his wounds and began helping the injured personnel. But the gunman resumed the attack. Nylander fired at the man again before being shot fatally.

3 My Qualifications Oregon State University, BS, in Atmospheric Science, years experience forecasting for: –C-5 –C-141 –C-130 –A-10 –U-2 –F-16 –F-15 –B-52 –41 st Brigade Combat Team/ 101 Air Assault Division –Combat Medals for DESERT STORM/OEF

4 My Qualifications Oregon State University, BS, in Atmospheric Science, years experience forecasting for: –C-5 –C-141 –C-130 –A-10 –U-2 –F-16 –F-15 –B-52 –41 st Brigade Combat Team/ 101 Air Assault Division –Combat Medals for DESERT STORM/OEF

5 My Qualifications Oregon State University, BS, in Atmospheric Science, years experience forecasting for: –C-5 –C-141 –C-130 –A-10 –U-2 –F-16 –F-15 –B-52 –41 st Brigade Combat Team/ 101 Air Assault Division –Combat Medals for DESERT STORM/OEF

6 My Qualifications Oregon State University, BS, in Atmospheric Science, years experience forecasting for: –C-5 –C-141 –C-130 –A-10 –U-2 –F-16 –F-15 –B-52 –41 st Brigade Combat Team/ 101 Air Assault Division –Combat Medals for DESERT STORM/OEF

7 My Qualifications Oregon State University, BS, in Atmospheric Science, years experience forecasting for: –C-5 –C-141 –C-130 –A-10 –U-2 –F-16 –F-15 –B-52 –41 st Brigade Combat Team/ 101 Air Assault Division –Combat Medals for DESERT STORM/OEF

8 My Qualifications Oregon State University, BS, in Atmospheric Science, years experience forecasting for: –C-5 –C-141 –C-130 –A-10 –U-2 –F-16 –F-15 –B-52 –41 st Brigade Combat Team/ 101 Air Assault Division –Combat Medal for DESERT STORM/OEF

9 My Qualifications Oregon State University, BS, in Atmospheric Science, years experience forecasting for: –C-5 –C-141 –C-130 –A-10 –U-2 –F-16 –F-15 –B-52 –41 st Brigade Combat Team/ 101 Air Assault Division –Combat Medals for DESERT STORM/OEF

10 My Qualifications Oregon State University, BS, in Atmospheric Science, years experience forecasting for: –C-5 –C-141 –C-130 –A-10 –U-2 –F-16 –F-15 –B-52 –41 st Brigade Combat Team/ 101 Air Assault Division –Combat Medals for DESERT STORM/OEF

11 My Qualifications Oregon State University, BS, in Atmospheric Science, years experience forecasting for: –C-5 –C-141 –C-130 –A-10 –U-2 –F-16 –F-15 –B-52 –41 st Brigade Combat Team/ 101 Air Assault Division –Combat Medals for DESERT STORM/OEF

12 My Qualifications Oregon State University, BS, in Atmospheric Science, years experience forecasting for: –C-5 –C-141 –C-130 –A-10 –U-2 –F-16 –F-15 –B-52 –41 st Brigade Combat Team/ 101 Air Assault Division –Combat Medals for DESERT STORM/OEF

13 Oregon State University, BS, in Atmospheric Science, years experience forecasting for: –C-5 –C-141 –C-130 –A-10 –U-2 –F-16 –F-15 –B-52 –41st Brigade Combat Team –Combat Medals for DESERT STORM/OEF My Qualifications

14 History of Weather Service "to provide for taking meteorological observations at the military stations in the interior of the continent and at other points in the States and Territories... and for giving notice on the northern (Great) Lakes and on the seacoast by magnetic telegraph and marine signals, of the approach and force of storms"

15 History of Weather Service After much thought and consideration, it was decided that this agency would be placed under the Secretary of War because military discipline would probably secure the greatest promptness, regularity, and accuracy in the required observations. Within the Department of War, it was assigned to the Signal Service Corps under Brigadier General Albert J. Myer. General Meyer gave the National Weather Service its first name: The Division of Telegrams and Reports for the Benefit of Commerce.

16 History of Weather Service The Signal Service's field stations grew in number from 24 in 1870 to 284 in Three times a day (usually 7:35 a.m., 4:35 p.m., and 11:35 p.m.), each station telegraphed an observation to Washington, D.C. These observations consisted of: Barometric pressure and its change since the last report. Temperature and its 24-hour change. Relative humidity. Wind velocity. Pressure of the wind in pounds per square foot. Amount of clouds. State of the weather.

17 History of Weather Service SERGEANT: Should the Rocky Mountain locust appear at or near your station at any time during the present year, you will obtain all the information possible relative to the following subjects: The date of appearance of the locusts; the direction from which they came; the direction and velocity of wind and character of weather at time of appearance; the length of time they remain in your neighborhood, and amount of damage done by them; the direction and velocity of flight; direction of flight when they leave your station; whether they fly with or against the wind; whether or not they laid eggs in great quantities in the surrounding country; what means were taken to destroy the eggs or the locusts; any other information you can obtain on this subject. Should the locusts have arrived at your station previous to the receipt of this communication, you will obtain all the information possible from the citizens residing near you and forward it without delay to this office. Make full notes in your daily journal in regard to locusts and forward the same with the abstract.

18 History 1870: Congress directs Secretary of War to establish a weather service Observer Sergeants are sent to take observations three times a day 1937: Army Air Corps Weather Service 1947: Weather aligned under Air Force –Army weather support come from Air Force

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29 Levels of War/Weather Strategic Operational Tactical Climate/Global Products Operational Weather Squadrons Combat Weather Teams

30 Levels of War/Weather

31 Strategic Operational Tactical Strategic Operational Tactical

32 Levels of War/Weather Strategic Operational Tactical Strategic Operational Tactical

33 Who Do We Support? Air Force Army Special Operations State Agencies in emergencies Natural Disasters

34 Combat Weather Teams We are the Eyes Forward Provide observation to the OWS (Operational Weather Squadron) Combine to give TAF and Weather Warnings and Advisories Advise Commanders on the ground

35 Air Force Support Air Tasking Order –Break out local unit missions –Work with Intelligence and Operations –See what weather impacts are to operation –Preparation for final briefings –Brief aircrews AIR TASKING ORDER AWACS F16 A10 F15 CI30 KC135 UAV CSAR AC130 B52 -2 SHIP PATROL GRID 1 -4 SHIP PATROL GRID 2 -2 SHIP PATROL GRID 3 NEXT, WEATHER WORKS WITH INTELLEGENCE AND OPERATIONS TO PLAN THE MISSIONS AND FACTOR WEATHER INTO THE PLANNING

36 GRID 1 GRID 2 GRID 3

37 Army Support Division send down Tasking Prior to Op Brigade Combat Team breaks down mission Weather at BCT advises Intel, Operations, Logistics on weather impacts Missions sent down to Battalion, Company, Platoon Level

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42 Iraqi AF Weather

43 The IMO

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47 Special Operations Weather Team TOP SECRET

48 There are fewer than 100 special operations weather technicians assigned to the 10th Combat Weather Squadron at Hurlburt Field, Fla. Most are stationed at different special operations detachments around the world. Training starts with a two-week Special Operations Weather Selection Course at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. Then airmen must complete the 30-week Special Operations Weather Initial Skills Course at Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. Three-week Army Airborne School at Fort Benning, Ga. 2½-week Air Force Basic Survival School at Fairchild Air Force Base, WA One-day Air Force Underwater Egress Training course at Fairchild 13-week Special Operations Weather Apprentice Course at Pope Air Force Base, N.C. 12- to 15-month Special Tactics Advanced Skill Training program at Hurlburt.

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50 AFSC 15W1, Weather Officer Education. The following education is mandatory for entry into the AFSC indicated: 15W1. Completion of 24 semester hours of college- level courses in meteorology –including 6 semester hours of dynamic meteorology –6 semester hours of analysis and prediction of weather systems (synoptic/mesoscale) –Also, undergraduate academic specialization in meteorology or atmospheric science is desirable.

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