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International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 INTERNATIONAL URBAN PARKS WORKSHOP Setting the Agenda for Urban Parks Dublin, September 2007.

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Presentation on theme: "International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 INTERNATIONAL URBAN PARKS WORKSHOP Setting the Agenda for Urban Parks Dublin, September 2007."— Presentation transcript:

1 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 INTERNATIONAL URBAN PARKS WORKSHOP Setting the Agenda for Urban Parks Dublin, September 2007

2 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 The Power of International Action Plans A Case Study Parks Victoria & the IUCN Neil McCarthy Member, World Commission on Protected Areas Chair, Parks Forum Trustee, Centre for Economic Development of Australia General Manager, Parks & Marine, Parks Victoria

3 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Title? Setting the Scene –IUCN & WCPA World Parks Congresses Durban Accord 2003 Management Effectiveness Task Force The Impact on a Park Agency Benefits

4 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Setting the Scene IUCN & WCPA

5 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Title CONSERVATION RECREATION PROTECTED AREAS URBAN PARKS Parks & open space IUCN

6 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Vision –To influence, encourage and assist societies throughout the world to conserve the integrity and diversity of nature and to ensure that any use of natural resources is equitable and ecologically sustainable. Purpose –Continue to improve scientific understanding of what natural ecosystems provide to humans. –Seek to ensure this knowledge is used in practical ways by bringing together scientists, policy makers, business leaders and NGOs to impact the way the world values and uses nature. Founded in October ,000 staff located in 62 countries (70% from developing countries). HQ in Gland, Switzerland. 1,000 member organizations: World Conservation Congress (General Assembly) meets every 4 years: Total operating revenue 2005: 100.2m Swiss Francs

7 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Species Survival Commission World Commission on Protected Areas Commission on Environmental Law Commission on Education and Communication Commission on Environmental, Economic and Social Policy Commission on Ecosystem Management Commissions

8 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 CONSERVATION RECREATION PROTECTED AREAS Parks & open space URBAN PARKS IUCN WCPA

9 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Vision –To promote the establishment and effective management of a world-wide representative network of terrestrial and marine protected areas, as an integral contribution to the IUCN mission. Objectives –To help governments and others plan protected areas and integrate them into all sectors, through provision of strategic advice to policy makers; –To strengthen capacity and effectiveness of protected areas managers, through provision of guidance, tools and information and a vehicle for networking; –To increase investment in protected areas, by persuading public and corporate donors of their value; and –To enhance WCPA's capacity to implement its programme, including through co-operation with IUCN members and partners

10 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Profile 1300 Members worldwide: - Managers of protected areas - Experts in the fields of interest - Academic specialists - NGO officials - Ex-officio members from partner organisations Membership process is by nomination 29 staff in 6 offices worldwide World Parks Congress every 10 years delegates from around the world - Durban Accord 2003: Call for global commitment and action

11 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Program Highlights Protected Area Management Categories: - speaking a common language - classification according to objectives - Promoting / prioritising action / raising standards Guidelines and standards: -Protected area management -Conserving biological diversity World Heritage List: - Identify & protect heritage sites of outstanding universal value - Under contract from UNESCO Capacity Building / Awareness / Education: -PALNet: on-line protected area learning network -Conferences: Management of visitors in recreational and protected areas

12 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 World Parks Congresses

13 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 World Parks Congresses IUCN, with leadership and support from the World Commission on Protected Areas (WCPA) stages World Park Congresses (WPC) every 10 years for the benefit of the conservation community and the world at large. The Congress brings together the largest global assembly of protected area specialists, managers and experts to focus on the state of the planet's protected areas, the challenges they face and the opportunities before them. The WPCA acts as a catalyst for global protected area action and recommends future directions for these special places on earth.

14 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 The World Parks Congresses have been held in: Seattle, USA, 1962 Yellowstone, USA, 1972 Theme "National Parks - A Heritage for a Better World" Bali, Indonesia, 1982 Theme "Parks for Development" Caracas, Venezuela, 1992 Theme "Parks for Life" Durbin, South Africa, 2003 Theme Benefits Beyond Boundaries

15 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 First World Congress - Seattle (USA) 1962 The purpose : –to establish a more effective international understanding of national parks and to encourage further development of the national park movement on a worldwide scale. Issues discussed included: the effects of humans on wildlife; species extinction; the religious significance and aesthetic meaning of certain parks and wilderness; international supervision of boundary parks; the economic benefits of tourism; the role of national parks in scientific studies; and the practical problems of park management. The overall consensus was that national parks were of international significance.

16 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Second World Congress Yellowstone (USA) 1972 This coincided with the centennial of Yellowstone. By 1972 the nations of the world could count more than 1,200 national parks or equivalent reserves Issues discussed at the conference included: –the effects of tourism on protected areas; –broad aspects of park planning and management; –special, social scientific and environmental problems within national parks in wet tropical, arid, and mountain regions; –controversial aspects of wildlife management in protected areas; –the social, scientific and environmental problems of marine, island, polar and sub-polar protected areas; –the problems associated with communicating park values to visitors and engendering environmental awareness; –improving international training opportunities; –opportunities to expand and improve the global park system; and –the needs and benefits of public support for national parks and equivalent reserves.

17 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Third World Congress - Bali (Indonesia) 1982 Focused on the role of protected areas in sustaining society. The attendance was some 350 PA professionals Ten major areas of concern were recognised by the congress: –The inadequacy of the existing worldwide network of terrestrial PAs. –The global need for more marine, coastal and freshwater PAs. –The ecological and managerial quality of existing PAs needed to be improved. –A system of consistent categories of PAs was noted as crucial to balance conservation and development needs. –PAs should be linked with sustainable development as nature conservation is not accomplished only by the setting aside of specially protected natural areas. –Capacity to manage PAs must be developed. –Economic tools such as cost-benefit analysis are needed to support and promote the true value of PAs. –Monitoring is vital to ensure that PAs can meet the needs of society and that they are effectively managed. –International cooperation mechanisms must be promoted. –A global programme on PAs must be developed using the IUCN network.

18 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 IVth World Congress Caracas (Venezuela) 1992 WPCA, Caracas was the largest of all the congresses attracting 2,500 participants The major messages coming from the congress included: –The relationship between people and PAs is too often ignored: –Conserving biodiversity: –Conservation on a regional scale: –Funding for PAs –Building a stronger constituency for conservation: The goal of the "Caracas Action Plan" was to extend the PA network to cover at least 10% of each major biome by the Year 2000.

19 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Vth World Congress Durban, South Africa 2003 The challenge before the 2003 Congress was to demonstrate how protected areas are relevant to the broader economic, social and environmental agenda for humankind in the 21st Century. The theme of the Congress responded to this challenge: "Benefits Beyond Boundaries". It captured the opportunities for protected areas in the next millennium and the range of meanings or interpretations implicit within the terms "benefits" and "boundaries" provided the flexibility to explore a wide variety of relevant sub-themes for the Congress.

20 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Durban Accord 2003

21 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Durban Accord 2003 Key Outputs –Congress recommendations 80 page document containing the key recommendations from each of the Congress Streams –Durban Accord 38 page document outlining the key directions and actions for the next ten years 186 Actions at International, Regional, National and Agency level

22 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Durban Accord -Management Effectiveness A key IUCN & WCPA objective: –To strengthen capacity and effectiveness of protected areas managers, through provision of guidance, tools and information and a vehicle for networking;

23 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Durban Accord -Management Effectiveness Durban Accord –Outcome 4: There are effectively managed protected areas, with reliable reporting on their management –International Action Assess globally, through the CBD process, the effectiveness of protected area management and associated compliance mechanisms….. –National Action Establish quantifiable, verifiable and sustained monitoring and evaluation systems to chart the state of protected areas and their key attributes, as developed by WCPA

24 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Durban Accord -Management Effectiveness Protected Area Authority Action –Support the implementation of monitoring and evaluation systems, consistent with the WCPA framework for assessing management effectiveness, that are sustainable and resource- efficient, and that engage other institutions and local communities. Use the results to improve all aspects of management and to ensure that these results are made available to all relevant constituencies.

25 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Management Effectiveness Task Force

26 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Management Effectiveness Task Force WCPA established Task Force –Management Effectiveness Task Force Chaired by a WCPA Vice-Chair Representatives from all continents Priorities include Strengthening –Protected Area Management Effectiveness, –Protected Area Management Categories, –Integration of Conservation Science (including traditional knowledge) in management decisions, Tools and Mechanisms, and –Setting and Maintaining Protected Area standards

27 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Management Effectiveness Task Force Management effectiveness as a priority: –Many protected areas around the world are not effectively managed. –In response, management effectiveness will continue as a priority with a focus on improving on and learning from past approaches. –New protocols are needed to evaluate the efficacy and effectiveness of management in relation to the IUCN Protected Areas Management Categories, and to take on board the increased recognition of cultural and spiritual factors in the effective management of protected areas. –Information arising from the assessment management effectiveness must be better applied to on ground management actions and also to guide donor support for protected area investment.

28 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Management Effectiveness Task Force Certification as a priority: –Certification may open new opportunities, benefits and incentives for protected areas management at national and international levels. WCPA aims to explore this possibility with the full involvement of protected areas agencies and key PAs stakeholders. Indicators of management quality to assess the potential application of methods for certification of protected areas at national and international levels will be reviewed and applied, as appropriate

29 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Management Effectiveness Task Force Global meetings: –Melbourne 2003 –Durbin 2003 Publications

30 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Management Effectiveness Task Force

31 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 State of the Parks

32 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Parks Victoria Profile Management of 4.1 million hectares of parks & reserves: 17% of State of Victoria 70% of Victorian coastline 73.5 million visitors per year: 40 million to terrestrial parks and reserves 2.7 million to marine national parks & sanctuaries 30.8 million to piers, jetties, bays Over 1,000 employees at 120 workcentres: 75% in regional Victoria over half trained in emergency wildfire response Annual Budget of $158m: Capital program of nearly $20m per year Parks & Reserves Trust $60m per year Earned revenue growth through commercial program

33 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007

34 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 State of the Parks 2005 Expanded

35 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Purpose of SoP To report on outcomes of Parks Victorias management of the parks network by identifying long-term trends in response to 10 year directions outlined in the Corporate Plan; To report on all of Parks Victoria's Key Output Groups: natural values management, cultural values management, visitor services and wildfire and other emergency management, and be released every five years.

36 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Background Initial SoP report produced in First in Australia. Changes from SoP 2000 and second edition Links to State of the Environment and State of The Forests Fits within long-term reporting within PV Output Model Strong focus on management effectiveness Based on world best-practice models (PSR, WCPA) Framework reviewed and endorsed by experts in State of reports, and PVs independent Environment Committee

37 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 What is SoP based on? Use of both quantitative and qualitative data –corporate databases (e.g. EIS, AMS) –statewide datasets (e.g. Flora Information System) –commissioned reports such as statewide risk assessments & asset condition reports –monitoring programs –staff questionnaire (400 parks & 250 staff) –Review of framework by leading Science Panel

38 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Management Effectiveness Cycle

39 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007

40 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 ROLE of SoP in Management Setting objectives, identifying priorities & planning LEGISLATION & POLICY Resourcing & implementing Service & protection outcomes Annual reporting Corporate Plan & Review State of the Parks Delivering annual actions 1 year all parks 3 years most parks 5 years some parks Evaluation & Reporting 10 yr 3 yr 1 yr Levels of Protection & Service

41 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 SCOPE of State of the Parks Inventory of values & assets Achieving Objectives Condition of values Effective services & Mgt of risk Efficient delivery of services Planning Indigenous Cultural Values Mgt community involvement / satisfaction appropriate interpretation mechanisms in place to reduce threats Heritage Cultural Values Mgt summary of site condition sustainable use of sites appropriate interpretation Natural Values Mgt case studies showing trends & condition of values extent of & trends in pests: staff opinion & case studies Visitor Services asset cond. visitor & community satisfaction achievement of service offer summary of activities undertaken annually planning mechanisms in place & implemented OUTCOMES (10 yrs) OUTPUTS (3 yrs) INPUTS (1 yr)

42 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Benefits beyond Boundaries

43 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 How does SoP fit in? International / national context –use of SoP reporting to improve park management & report to community based on world best-practice models (e.g. WCPA)

44 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Scope Inventory Method Priorities Resource allocation PVParks Canada US NPCA NSW 2001 system & park park some issues maps & quant. descriptive & semi- quant. descriptive system & park general recomd specific recomd system & park

45 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 initial SoP report produced in 2000 (1st in Australia) links to Whole of Government (State of the Environment & State of the Forests)

46 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 How does SoP evaluate effectiveness? outlines medium-long term management objectives for each of NVM, CVM, Recreation etc establishes a framework of indicators & measures for the parks network: –summarises trends and activities over a five year reporting period –where possible reports on trends and outcomes (e.g. visitor satisfaction trends, impact of rabbits) –highlights information gaps –summarises progress against management objectives

47 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Benefits in Australia & New Zealand Major Commonwealth, NSW Parks, Parks Victoria, Parks Forum and University of Queensland State of Parks linkage research to establish the ongoing benchmarks and standards for Parks –Precursor for the international benchmark and certification system Innovative management decision making –Levels of Service –Levels of Protection –Governance Park Risk Management system –Park Business Excellence Framework & Peer Review Major funding decisions by Government –3 year $100m Infrastructure redevelopment First actual landscape scale baseline data for climate change impact

48 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Benefits Beyond our Shores Ability to report on the STATE of the key biodiversity assets in Australia as required under International Treaties through the IUCN & WCPA

49 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 Questions ? ?

50 International Urban Parks Alliance Workshop Dublin 2007 INTERNATIONAL URBAN PARKS WORKSHOP Setting the Agenda for Urban Parks Sponsored by


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