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Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI Welcome! (THINGS TO INCLUDE IN YOUR HAND-OUT) INFORMATION ON WHO YOU ARE AND WHAT YOU’RE DOING e.g. Thanks for.

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Presentation on theme: "Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI Welcome! (THINGS TO INCLUDE IN YOUR HAND-OUT) INFORMATION ON WHO YOU ARE AND WHAT YOU’RE DOING e.g. Thanks for."— Presentation transcript:

1 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI Welcome! (THINGS TO INCLUDE IN YOUR HAND-OUT) INFORMATION ON WHO YOU ARE AND WHAT YOU’RE DOING e.g. Thanks for agreeing to take part in this Day of Discovery, which is being run by Ipsos MORI on behalf of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills. We are an independent research organisation, and our role is to gather all opinions - there are no right or wrong answers and we want to here what you honestly think! INFORMATION ON HOW YOU’LL USE THE VIEWS/DATA THAT YOU GATHER e.g. The things you say today will feed into a report on Public Attitudes to Science in the UK, that will be published in March. INFORMATION ON CONFIDENTIALITY AND ANONYMITY (IF APPLICABLE) e.g. We’ll be recording what you say through notes and in other ways but please rest assured that everything you say here today will remain anonymous and that information about you as an individual will not be passed on to or seen by anyone other than the researchers working on the project. We may use some of your words as a quotation in our report – but this will not be attributed to you personally! ANY INSTRUCTIONS THAT PEOPLE NEED e.g. Please grab a refreshment now, and when you go into the main room, please try to visit x number of the ‘stations’ (though feel free to visit as many as you want). Each of them are about a different topic, and each should take minutes to take part in. Please ask one of the facilitators for help if you’re not sure.

2 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI Example checklist ItemQuantityPrinted/ obtained Checked Equipment Laptops5 Segmentation excel sheet1 Video recording equipment1 Digital recorder8 Notepads and pens! 14 Facilitations materials Briefing note for scienctistsx15 Discussion guidex15 Station 1 - Welcome Segmentation questionnairex120 Initial participant hand-outx120 Station 2 A3 laminate posters12x1 A4 posters1x10 and 11x5 Station 3 Laminated posterx1 Worksheetx40 Station 4 A3 laminate posters8x1 4 science stories from this week, laminatedX1 Station 5 A3 laminate posters7x1 Collated poster hand-outs (A4)x40 Station 6 Hand-out 1x40 Hand-out 2x40 A3 laminate posters12x1 Examplesx3 End of event questionnairex120 Other Miscellaneous Name badges (stickers)x135 Dots (6 colours)x40 each colour Post-its (6 colours, matching the dots)x12 each colour Pensx120 Science magazinesx15 NewspapersX10 Coloured card, other creative materials for Station 6 Pritt stickx8 Scissorsx8 Potential checklist for the day

3 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI How informed do people feel about science? The three topics that people feel least informed about The three topics that people feel most informed about DO PEOPLE NEED TO BE MORE INFORMED ABOUT SCIENCE? HOW?

4 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI Nanotechnology WHAT DO YOU WANT TO KNOW ABOUT IT? The science of building machines at a miniscule level. If you imagine the size of pin head – nanotechnology builds machines that are at least 10,000 times smaller than that. The machines have many uses, including to making strong, light materials and in medicine e.g. suncream.

5 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI Renewable energy Renewable energy sources include sunlight, wind, rain, tides, waves and geothermal heat. Unlike fossil fuels, they will not run out and are replenished by natural processes. WHAT DO YOU WANT TO KNOW ABOUT IT?

6 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI Vaccination against diseases Vaccines are given to help someone become immune to a disease: they teach the body how to fight a disease. Vaccines are the main reason that people no longer get smallpox, and that polio, measles and tetanus are much rarer. WHAT DO YOU WANT TO KNOW ABOUT IT?

7 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI Clinical trials After a medicine has been tested in a laboratory and on animals, it can be tested in a clinical trial on humans. Researchers will test if it is safe, and if it works. Clinical trials can involve patients or healthy people, or both. WHAT DO YOU WANT TO KNOW ABOUT IT?

8 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI Economics and the way the economy works Economics looks at how products and services are made, how they move around, and how they are bought and sold. It tries to discover laws that underpin these things, and use these make predictions about what will happen. It also looks at ways that different economies in the world affect each other. WHAT DO YOU WANT TO KNOW ABOUT IT?

9 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI Climate change Significant and long-term changes to weather patterns are known as climate change. It can change normal weather conditions – making it hotter and melting ice caps, for example. It can also make extreme weather events – such as storms – more or less common, or change where they typically occur in the world. Certain human activities have been identified as significant causes of recent climate change WHAT DO YOU WANT TO KNOW ABOUT IT?

10 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI Synthetic biology Synthetic biology is a mixture of biology and engineering. It involves inventing or changing biological parts or systems. A synthetic- biologist might, for example, make or change something’s DNA to make it grow a particular way, or into a certain thing. WHAT DO YOU WANT TO KNOW ABOUT IT?

11 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI Stem cell research Most cells in the body only do one thing: they’re specialised. Stem cells, however, can grow into any kind of cell in the body – and scientists are working out how to make them act as treatments. For example, it might be possible to treat spinal injuries by injecting someone with stem cells that will grow into new spinal tissue. WHAT DO YOU WANT TO KNOW ABOUT IT?

12 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI Nuclear Power Nuclear power is a non-renewable power source. Instead of burning fuel, like a coal power station, nuclear energy is produced by splitting atoms of uranium. In addition to energy, this process produces radioactive nuclear waste, which must be disposed of safely. WHAT DO YOU WANT TO KNOW ABOUT IT?

13 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI Use of animals in research Animals are used in research in a variety of ways. All medicines must be tested on animals before they are tested on humans – to see if they are safe. Sometimes animals are observed for research into their behaviour. Testing of cosmetic products on animals is banned in the UK. WHAT DO YOU WANT TO KNOW ABOUT IT?

14 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI Genetically modified plants Genetically modified plants have had their genetic make-up (DNA) changed to produce desirable characteristics. For example, some food stuffs are made disease-resistant. This can allow more, or better quality food to be produced. WHAT DO YOU WANT TO KNOW ABOUT IT?

15 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI Ask a Scientist! HANDOUT What do you do day to day? How did you come to have the job you have now? Where do you work?  A lab? An office? A university? Do you work in teams? Who decides what you research?  Who decides what you are allowed to research?  Are you allowed to study anything you want to? Who funds your research? Does anyone regulate your research? Who? How? What influences how you report the results? How is it decided whether you publish your results? Who decides where you publish your results? Do you think your work might change in the future? How ? This area is for you to ask some working scientists any questions you have about how they do their job. If you think science or the work of scientists is at all mysterious – or just unknown to you – this is your chance to get some clarity. You can ask any (relevant!) questions that come to mind, but below are a few to consider to get you started, if needed.

16 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI How do scientists work? POST YOUR QUESTIONS ON HERE, OR ASK ONE OF OUR SCIENTISTS!

17 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI How should they be trained? Where should they work? What rules should be in place around their work? Anything else? My vision for scientists! (WORKSHEET SIDE 1) Tell us how you think scientists should work!

18 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI My vision for scientists! (WORKSHEET SIDE 2) What areas of science should they work in? Who should decide if their work should be funded? How? Where should the funding come from? How should they communicate with the public? Tell us how you think scientists should work You can think about all types of scientists in you answers, or one particular type e.g. biologists, engineers, scientists working for private companies

19 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI CONSIDERING THE RISKS OF NEW TECHNOLOGIES 5 in 6 people are confident that scientists in the UK have thoroughly considered the risks of new technologies before they are used WHAT KIND OF RISKS SHOULD SCIENTISTS BE CONSIDERING? SHOULD THEY BE CONSIDERING ANYTHING ELSE?

20 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI INFORMATION ABOUT REGULATION Almost 9 in 10 people think that those who regulate (i.e. those who set the rules about what scientists should do) science need to communicate with the public WHAT SHOULD SCIENCE REGULATORS TELL THE PUBLIC ABOUT THEIR WORK?

21 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI SCIENTISTS INFORMING PEOPLE 2 out of 3 people agree that scientists put too little effort into informing the public about their work IF SCIENTISTS PUT MORE EFFORT INTO INFORMING PEOPLE, WHAT EFFECT WOULD THAT HAVE ON HOW PEOPLE SEE SCIENCE?

22 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI I WOULD TRUST SCIENCE MORE IF… ADD YOUR IDEAS FOR MAKING SCIENCE MORE TRUSTWORTHY TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC!

23 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI SCIENCE IN THE MEDIA Does the media sensationalise science? 3 in 4 of you think so… WHAT SHOULD BE DONE TO KEEP REPORTING ‘REAL’? !!!?!?!! ???!!!!!

24 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI POLITICIANS AND SCIENCE 7 in 10 people feel that politicians are too easily swayed by the media’s reaction to scientific issues HOW DO YOU THINK POLITICIANS SHOULD REACT TO BIG MEDIA STORIES ABOUT SCIENCE?

25 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI JOURNALISTS AND SCIENCE Do journalists check the reliability of scientific research findings before they write about them? 2 in 3 people think that they never, or only occasionally do! WHY DO PEOPLE THINK THIS?

26 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI I WOULD TRUST REPORTING ON SCIENCE MORE IF… ADD YOUR IDEAS FOR MAKING THE MEDIA COVERAGE OF SCIENCE MORE TRUSTWORTHY!

27 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI GOVERNMENT SPENDING ON SCIENCE 4 out of 5 people agree that even if it brings no immediate benefits, scientific research which advances knowledge should be funded by the government WHAT DOES ADVANCING KNOWLEDGE MEAN TO YOU?

28 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI YOUNG PEOPLE AND SCIENTIFIC DEVELOPMENT 9 in 10 people agree that young people’s interest in science is essential for our future prosperity HOW CAN YOUNG PEOPLE BE ENCOURAGED TO TAKE AN INTEREST?

29 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI DEVELOPING THE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY SECTOR 4 out of 5 people agree that the UK needs to develop its science and technology sector in order to enhance its international competitiveness WHO SHOULD PROVIDE THE FUNDING TO DO THIS?

30 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY FUNDING OF SCIENCE 2 out of 3 people agree that scientists are too dependent on business and industry for funding WHAT ARE YOUR CONCERNS ABOUT SCIENTISTS GETTING THEIR FUNDING FROM BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY?

31 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI SCIENCE FUNDING When asked who funds scientific research in the UK… 70% said the Government/ taxpayer 36% said private industry/ business/ companies 16% said charities 10% said universities 5% said wealthy individuals 17% said don’t know or didn’t answer DOES THIS SURPRISE YOU? WHY? In fact, the government funds 32% of scientific research, and private industry 46%

32 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI CONCENTRATING PUBLIC FUNDING OF SCIENCE In 2013, the government decided to give £600 million funding to "eight great technologies” to support UK science strengths and business capabilities. IF YOU WERE DECIDING PUBLIC SCIENCE FUNDING, WHAT AREAS WOULD YOU CONCENTRATE ON TO HELP THE UK ECONOMY?

33 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI DEVELOPING THE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY SECTOR Just over 3 out of 5 people agree that the UK needs to develop its science and technology sector in order to enhance its international competitiveness HOW SHOULD THE UK DO THIS?

34 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI GOVERNMENT SPENDING ON SCIENCE 1 in 7 people agree that Government funding for science should be cut because the money can be better spent elsewhere WHAT WOULD CHANGE THEIR MINDS?

35 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI THE BENEFITS OF SCIENTIFIC ADVANCES Just over 1 in 4 people agree that scientific advances tend to benefit the rich more than they benefit the poor DOES THIS SURPRISE YOU?

36 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI GOVERNMENT SPENDING AND SCIENTIFIC GROWTH Just over 3 in 4 people agree that scientific research makes a direct contribution to economic growth in the UK HOW DO YOU THINK THAT SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH MAKES A CONTRIBUTION TO ECONOMIC GROWTH? WHO BENEFITS? IN WHAT WAYS?

37 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI SCIENCE IN EVERYDAY LIFE When asked where they come into contact with people in their daily lives, this is what people said… WHERE DO YOU COME INTO CONTACT WITH SCIENCE IN YOUR DAILY LIFE?

38 Version 1 | Internal Use Only© Ipsos MORI My Science Journey (HANDOUT) What are your first memories of science? What was science like at school? What did you enjoy or not enjoy about it? What events in your life (news events, personal, technological developments etc.) made you more / less interested in science? What were / are your favourite topics? When have you been most / least interested in science? What science related hobbies have you ever been involved with? When were you more open / excited / interested to learn about science in your life? This area is for you to create a poster that shows the points in your life you have come into contact with science – in any way! Draw or write a timeline, and let us know when you’ve been most interested and informed, and why. And when you have been less interested and informed – why was that? There are some examples on the walls, and please feel free to look at and comment on the posters that other participants have made earlier in the day. There are some questions below that might help you get started:


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