Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

IT KEEPS GETTING BETTER! Using School-wide Data for Continuous Quality Improvement Kelsey R. Morris, EdD—University of Oregon Nadia K. Sampson, MA—University.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "IT KEEPS GETTING BETTER! Using School-wide Data for Continuous Quality Improvement Kelsey R. Morris, EdD—University of Oregon Nadia K. Sampson, MA—University."— Presentation transcript:

1 IT KEEPS GETTING BETTER! Using School-wide Data for Continuous Quality Improvement Kelsey R. Morris, EdD—University of Oregon Nadia K. Sampson, MA—University of Oregon Session C13

2 Session Overview Value of data-based decision making Nexus of data-based decision making and SWPBIS Cycle of continuous quality improvement Student Outcomes Implementation Fidelity Goal Craft precise problem statements Craft solution-based action plans Engage in continuous quality improvement

3 Maximizing Your Session Participation Where are you in your implementation of the concepts presented? Exploration & Adoption Installation Initial Implementation Full Implementation What do you hope to learn? What new learning do you take away from the session? What will you do with your new learning?

4 Data Collection & Analysis Data are “the numerical results of measuring some quantifiable aspect of behavior” (Mayer, Sulzer-Azaroff, & Wallace, 2012, p. 130). Data collection involves: Observation of a behavior Notation of the behavior characteristics and context Data analysis involves: Converting numerical results into graphs Using graphed results for instructional decision making

5 Value and Utility of Data Repeatedly giving people the right information, at the right time, in the right format is the single most effective way to improve decision making and achieve valued outcomes (Gilbert, 1978). Data Practices Systems Valued Outcomes

6 Performance Gap & Cause Analysis Current Reality Valued Outcomes Environment/ System 1—Information Clear expectations Timely, specific feedback 2—Resources Materials, tools Time Processes 3—Incentives Financial & non- financial encouragement Individual Persons 6—Knowledge Requisite knowledge and skill base 5—Capacity Ability to learn and do 4—Motives Desire to work and excel

7 Data-based Decision Making Effective teams use data to document progress and outcomes, guide decisions, and inform stakeholders (Boudett, City, & Murnane, 2006; Burke, 2010; Deno, 2005; Hill 2010; Newton, Algozzine, Algozzine, Horner, & Todd, 2011; Newton, Horner, Algozzine, Todd, & Algozzine, 2009; Pidgeon & Gregory, 2004; Renfro & Grieshaber, 2009) A critical predictor of sustained implementation of SWPBIS (Coffey & Horner, 2012; McIntosh et al., 2013) Fidelity and student outcome data are essential (Fixsen, Blase, Metz, & Van Dyke, 2013) Continues to be a struggle for schools (Dunn, Airola, Lo, & Garrison, 2013; Schildkamp, Ehren, & Lai, 2012; Telzrow, McNamara, & Hollinger, 2000) Advances in computer technology could provide efficient means for data management (Wayman, 2005)

8 Components of SWPBIS Defined Behavior Expectations Teaching of Behavior Expectations Acknowledgment Systems Consequence Systems Evaluation

9 Evaluation of Effectiveness Essential Question Is the student successful with this level of support? Intensity is a two-way street. Improved student outcomes are the result of continually monitoring and modifying (as needed) instruction, interventions, and supports. Goal: Increase prosocial behavior and enhance quality of life

10 Continuous Quality Improvement Plan Implement Evaluate

11 Adult Behaviors Cause Student Change OutcomesFidelity

12 School-wide Behavior Data Critical Questions How often are problem behaviors occurring? When are problem behaviors frequently occurring? Where are problem behaviors frequently occurring? What problem behaviors are frequently occurring? Who is frequently engaging in problem behaviors?

13 School-wide Behavior Data September = rate of 3.50 average referrals/day/month October = rate of 4.53 average referrals/day/month Spikes at 9:45 AM and 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM Top 3 non-classroom locations = bathroom, playground, & hallway

14 School-wide Behavior Data Tuesday and Wednesday are the school days with the highest frequency. Top 3 Problem Behaviors = inappropriate language, defiance, disruption 5 th & 8 th grades have the highest frequency 25 students have more than 1 referral

15 Problem Solving with Precision The statement of a problem is important for team-based problem solving. Everyone must be working on the same problem with the same assumptions. Problems are often framed in the “primary” form. Raises awareness Not useful for problem solving Precise problem statements result from a detailed data review and are solvable.

16 Problem Solving with Precision Primary Statements There are too many referrals Gang behavior is increasing The cafeteria is out of control Student disrespect is a big problem Precision Statement There are more ODRs for aggression on the playground than last month. These are most likely to occur during first recess, with a large number of students, and the aggression is related to getting access to the new playground equipment.

17 Problem Solving with Precision There are more ODRs for aggression on the playground than last month. These are most likely to occur during first recess, with a large number of students, and the aggression is related to getting access to the new playground equipment. What?Where?When?Who?Why? AggressionPlayground1 st Recess Large number of students To get new playground equipment

18 Data Analysis for Precision Location Problem Behavior Time of Day Persons Involved Motivation Precise Problem Statement

19 Continuous Quality Improvement Plan Implement Evaluate

20 Solution Development & Action Planning Essential Elements Explanation 1. Prevention How can we avoid the problem context? Who? What? When? Where? 2. Teaching How can we define, teach, and monitor what we want? Teach appropriate behavior, use problem behavior as the non-example 3. Recognition How can we build in systematic acknowledgment/rewards for positive behavior? 4. Extinction How can we prevent the problem behavior from continuing to pay off? (tied to motivation/function of behavior) 5. Consequences What are efficient, consistent consequences for problem behavior? 6. Evaluation How will we collect and use data to evaluate our fidelity and outcomes?

21 Solution Development & Action Planning Remember to include the precise problem statement as well as a statement of the goal.

22 Continuous Quality Improvement Plan Implement Evaluate

23

24 Evaluation— SWIS was installed for data collection and analysis

25 Riverbend Action Planning TFI “subgroup” completed the TFI and developed goals and action items for subcommittees Subcommittees for: 1.3 & 1.4 Behavioral Expectations & Teaching Expectations 1.6 Discipline Policies 1.9 Feedback & Acknowledgement 1.11 Student/Family/Community Involvement TFI “subgroup” members led subcommittee work Communication Recruiting workers Setting meetings

26 Riverbend Action Planning Behavioral Expectations Established school-wide behavior matrix Drafted lesson plans Designed and ordered signage Discipline Policies Established a response to problem behavior flowchart Established a student-friendly flowchart Developed training on referral form completion and problem behavior definitions Feedback & Acknowledgement Established a system for how an individual’s acknowledgement benefits the group (e.g., Party in a Bucket) Created signage to advertise the acknowledgement system Established language to be used by all staff when delivering acknowledgement Student/Family/Community Involvement Established calendars that can be distributed to all families; each month of the calendar highlights a different PBIS component Developed a survey to garner community feedback Subcommittees prepared minute rollout trainings for all staff

27

28

29

30 Evaluation— SWIS was installed for data collection and analysis

31 Hamlin Action Planning PBIS Team used TFI results to identify items of importance 1.3 & 1.4 Behavioral Expectations & Teaching Expectations 1.6 Discipline Policies (e.g., flowchart) 1.9 Feedback & Acknowledgement (e.g., menu of reinforcers) PBIS Team worked on items during team meetings Solicited feedback from whole faculty Revised as needed Created lesson plans to teach all staff the aspects of school- wide PBIS during in-service week

32

33

34 Enablers of Sustainability McIntosh, K., Predy, L., Upreti, G., Hume, A. E. & Mathews, S. (2014).

35 Barriers to Sustainability Number of Responses McIntosh, K., Predy, L., Upreti, G., Hume, A. E. & Mathews, S. (2014).

36 What is most related to high sustainability? McIntosh, K., Predy, L., Upreti, G., Hume, A. E. & Mathews, S. (2014).

37 IT KEEPS GETTING BETTER! Using School-wide Data for Continuous Quality Improvement Kelsey R. Morris, EdD—University of Oregon Nadia K. Sampson, MA—University of Oregon Session C13


Download ppt "IT KEEPS GETTING BETTER! Using School-wide Data for Continuous Quality Improvement Kelsey R. Morris, EdD—University of Oregon Nadia K. Sampson, MA—University."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google