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The following presentation was made to parents on the Aldine Coordinating Committee along with administrators on December 1, 2004. It identifies common.

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Presentation on theme: "The following presentation was made to parents on the Aldine Coordinating Committee along with administrators on December 1, 2004. It identifies common."— Presentation transcript:

1 The following presentation was made to parents on the Aldine Coordinating Committee along with administrators on December 1, It identifies common behavior problems found at different grade levels in the Aldine Independent Schools. The presentation has been modified for viewing on this site. Hopefully it will assist you in working with your child to “Produce the Nation’s Best.”

2 Presentation 2 Interventions for Common Behavior Problems

3 Five Most Common Misbehaviors in Elementary School Defiance of Authority/Behavior Disruption of Class Disrespectful to an Adult Fighting and Scuffling Poor Bus Behavior

4 Reasons Why Some Students Misbehave They get frustrated because they had a different perception of what was suppose to happen. How did you communicate what it is you wanted the child to do? They need structure. Set limits. Do you say yes to every request? Do you have routines in place at home? Have your children been taught the routines? They think they are “bad” so they act the part. Do you tell your child or children you are just “bad”, or do they hear you tell others, “This child is just bad.” R. Bowman, T. Carr, K. Cooper, R. Miles & T. Toner, (1998). Innovative Strategies for Unlocking Difficult Adolescents, YouthLight, Inc., Chapin, South Carolina.

5 Reasons Why Some Students Misbehave They don’t know how to ask for what they want so they bully, or act out, to get it. Teach your children how to ask for what they want. Reward or recognize them when you see them do it. The house or classroom is not calm, and there is too much confusion. What type of environment have you created for your child? Is it chaotic? They feel misunderstood. Do you communicate to your child that you understand his/her feelings? R. Bowman, T. Carr, K. Cooper, R. Miles & T. Toner, (1998). Innovative Strategies for Unlocking Difficult Adolescents, YouthLight, Inc., Chapin, South Carolina.

6 Reasons Why Some Students Misbehave They feel overwhelmed with the tasks they are suppose to do. Can the child understand and complete what it is you are asking them to do? They have been criticized. Do you criticize everything your child does? They are hungry. The child just might be hungry. They are into the “victim cycle.” R. Bowman, T. Carr, K. Cooper, R. Miles & T. Toner, (1998). Innovative Strategies for Unlocking Difficult Adolescents, YouthLight, Inc., Chapin, South Carolina.

7 Facts About Hostility and Defiance Students who are hostile are generally attempting to meet their need for power. Many hostile or aggressive acts are their attempts to communicate feelings or hurt and inner pain. Some students do not even know that they are feeling hurt or pain. Their anger and defiance has become a SHIELD to cover up those inner feelings. Some hostility is learned. Children learn what they SEE. If they grow up with an adult role model who expresses all feelings in the form of hostility and defiance, they may imitate that behavior. It is what they have observed their entire lives. R. Bowman, T. Carr, K. Cooper, R. Miles & T. Toner, (1998). Innovative Strategies for Unlocking Difficult Adolescents, YouthLight, Inc., Chapin, South Carolina.

8 Strategies for Handling Angry, Hostile and Defiant Children Teach social skills and appropriate ways to deal with the anger. Be consistent with enforcing rules and consequences. Establish clear consequences. Appropriate consequences are: Related to the misbehavior Reasonable Respectful and conscious of the student’s self-esteem Use time outs in the same room or another location – have a place where the child can go to calm down.

9 Strategies for Handling Angry, Hostile and Defiant Children Use “when-then” statements. When you do this behavior, then___________ will happen. Remove the child away from the audience, or the audience away from the child. Conflicts may intensify when others are watching to see who wins. Realize that you cannot “make” children do things. We can threaten, take away rights and privileges, and send notes home, but until the child chooses to do the work, it will not get done.

10 Strategies for Handling Angry, Hostile and Defiant Children Avoid a “head on” fight or power struggle. If you win the fight, you may win the battle, but lose the war. Limit exposure to TV. By the age of two to three, most children regularly watch hours of television each week. Of all prime-time network dramas, 75% contain some act of physical, mental, or verbal violence. Of parents, 78% have used the television as a “baby sitter” at one time or another. Of all households, 98% have at least one TV turned on an average of 6 hours per day. Teach problem solving or conflict resolution skills.

11 “SHARE” With Attention-Seeking Children S Show the child how to give and get attention in appropriate ways. H Humor is something learned. Model and teach appropriate humor. A Analyze the cause for the behavior. R Reinforce appropriate attention-getting behavior. Emphasize the child’s strengths and ignore silliness. E Explore other strategies with the adolescent to meet the goal being achieved through clowning or teasing. R. Bowman, T. Carr, K. Cooper, R. Miles & T. Toner, (1998). Innovative Strategies for Unlocking Difficult Adolescents, YouthLight, Inc., Chapin, South Carolina.

12 REMEMBER…. Some parents/teachers, out of frustration, tend to beg and plead with their students, hoping they will self-correct their disruptive behavior. Some parents/teachers, out of frustration, tend to threaten difficult students with severe consequences. The key to working with difficult children is develop an individualized approach based on each student’s unique needs. R. Bowman, T. Carr, K. Cooper, R. Miles & T. Toner, (1998). Innovative Strategies for Unlocking Difficult Adolescents, YouthLight, Inc., Chapin, South Carolina.

13 Hot Buttons How to Keep Your Children from Pushing Yours! DO NOT REACT! Once the student has seen that you are upset, the student will engage in the activity more and more. Keep Yourself Calm. Use positive affirmations. Practice deep breathing. Count to 10 or even to one hundred. Send the student from the room on an errand. Take Care of Yourself. Eat right. Sleep enough. Do something good for yourself each day. Use Humor and Have Fun. R. Bowman, T. Carr, K. Cooper, R. Miles & T. Toner, (1998). Innovative Strategies for Unlocking Difficult Adolescents, YouthLight, Inc., Chapin, South Carolina.

14 Ten Gifts That Will Help Students Feel More Positive About Themselves Give them responsibility. Give them a part in decision-making. Give the permission for their feelings. Give them reasonable rules. Give them “guard rails.” Give them unconditional hugs. Give them permission to make mistakes. Give them the truth. Give them freedom. Give them themselves. R. Bowman, T. Carr, K. Cooper, R. Miles & T. Toner, (1998). Innovative Strategies for Unlocking Difficult Adolescents, YouthLight, Inc., Chapin, South Carolina.

15 Reference R. Bowman, T. Carr, K. Cooper, R. Miles & T. Toner, (1998). Innovative Strategies for Unlocking Difficult Adolescents, YouthLight, Inc., Chapin, South Carolina.


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