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How Information on a Map Can Be Displayed Lesson 6.

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Presentation on theme: "How Information on a Map Can Be Displayed Lesson 6."— Presentation transcript:

1 How Information on a Map Can Be Displayed Lesson 6

2 Cartographer  Cartographers collect and interpret geographical information and prepare maps and other databases.  Cartographers use many tools to study and communicate geographic information.  They use photographs, satellite information, survey data, and other sources to collect information and translate it into maps and other tools needed for environmental planning and management.  Cartographers increasingly use global positioning systems (GPS) and geographic information systems (GIS) to collect and use geographic data.

3 How Information on a Map Can Be Displayed  Aerial photos, globes, polar projections, and location technologies are just a few of the examples of how information about the Earth can be displayed.  Each of these types of displays has different advantages and disadvantages.

4 Polar Projections  Because the Earth is round, map projections on flat surfaces always have some type of distortion.  A polar projection is good for showing the North Pole or the South Pole, but it does not accurately represent areas that are far away from the poles.

5 Polar Projections  On the map to the right, the areas furthest from the center point have a great deal of distortion.

6 Aerial Photos  Aerial photos show how land is being used in an area.  The aerial photo to the right shows roads, water, small buildings, and skyscrapers.

7 Aerial Photos  While different types of maps might show features such as roads or rivers, these types of maps have limitations and cannot show everything.  Aerial photos can be used to see types of information that cannot be seen on regular maps.

8 Globes  Because the Earth is round, the most accurate way to represent the Earth is on a round surface of a globe.  A globe is a scale model of the Earth that correctly represents area, the size and shape of physical features, distances between places, and compass directions.  A globe is very useful when looking at large areas or the entire world.

9 Geographic Information Systems  A Geographic Information System (GIS) records, analyzes, and presents data about a specific location.  The information is presented in different layers so that multiple features can be studied together.  Video: Geographic Information Systems (GIS)Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

10 Geographic Information Systems  This GIS displays monitoring wells, industries, and population of an area.

11 Global Positioning Systems  The Global Positioning System (GPS) uses a system of 24 satellites to pinpoint exact locations across the world.  This information is then sent through radio waves that can be received by the U.S. government or by individuals.  GPS is commonly used by individuals today to provide driving directions.  The Global Positioning System (GPS) uses a system of 24 satellites to pinpoint exact locations across the world.  This information is then sent through radio waves that can be received by the U.S. government or by individuals.  GPS is commonly used by individuals today to provide driving directions.

12 Digital Satellite Images  A special type of “ aerial photography ”  Photographs of Earth taken by satellites  Used to see what an area looks like high above the Earth’s surface Advantages  Creates more accurate maps  Covers a large ground area - showing mountains, rivers and roads  Can tell a great deal about what has happened to a city’s size, wealth, and population growth

13 Digital Satellite Imagery Bombay, India Pilger, Nebraska June 2014 Twin Tornadoes New Orleans, LA September 2005 Hurricane Katrina

14 Historical Maps  Can show the growth of a city over time.  Can provide information about places as they were in the past.  May show the political boundaries of a place during a certain time.  By comparing maps of the same area from different times, you can see how political boundaries change.

15 Historical Maps- continued The United States, 1845 The United States, 1848

16 Video: MapmakingMapmaking


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