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Slide 1 Comparison of Young Children’s Development by Child and Family Characteristics Tulsa County Results February 2014.

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Presentation on theme: "Slide 1 Comparison of Young Children’s Development by Child and Family Characteristics Tulsa County Results February 2014."— Presentation transcript:

1 slide 1 Comparison of Young Children’s Development by Child and Family Characteristics Tulsa County Results February 2014

2 slide 2 Background Risk to Ready encompasses the: ◦ Collection of data on Kindergarteners’ school readiness ◦ Sharing information in aggregate and by neighborhood with local leaders Purpose: ◦ To serve as a catalyst to mobilize and engage local leaders around a data-driven and action-oriented process ◦ To help early childhood stakeholders assess how to better support school readiness

3 slide 3 Background This Risk to Ready initiative part of a national initiative currently in its 4 th year of implementation

4 slide 4 Background Data collected on all Kindergarteners in each elementary school in Tulsa, Union and Sand Springs school districts ◦ Occurred from Winter 2011 to Winter 2013 Summaries of findings focused on details by neighborhood at ◦ Also available for Kay County and SE Oklahoma This presentation – unlike the others - shows details by child and family characteristics and early childhood education dosage

5 slide 5 Measuring School Readiness Kindergartener school readiness is measured using the Early Development Instrument (EDI) The EDI was developed by researchers at McMaster University in Canada ◦ Observational checklist with 103 core items ◦ Completed by teachers between 3 rd and 8 th month of school based on recall; takes about minutes/student Research supports that the EDI is a powerful predictor of later school success

6 slide 6 Overall Results Category Definitions for Each Domain “At Risk”: scoring <=10 th percentile of national sample “Very Ready”: scoring >=75 th percentile

7 slide 7 Overall Results

8 slide 8 DomainSubdomains% Not Ready Tulsa % Not Ready Natio n Physical health and well-being (13 items) Gross and fine motor abilities (holding pencil, climbing stairs, manipulating objects, energy throughout day) 31%30% Physical independence (bathroom, hand preference)17%13% Readiness for day (dressed appropriately, on time, fed, not sick/tired) 12%6% Social competence (26 items) Social competence (gets along/plays with other children, confidence) 15%11% Approaches to learning (listens, works independently, follows instruc.) 17%13% Respect and responsibility (follows rules, self control, tolerance)14%9% Readiness to explore new things (curious about world)3%4% Emotional maturity (30 items) Helps others32%29% Not hyperactive or inattentive24%18% Not aggressive 18% 11% Not anxious or fearful 4% 3% Language and cognitive development (26 items) Basic literacy9% Advanced literacy16%14% Basic numeracy13% Interest in books, reading, math and able to remember things19%16% Communication skills and general knowledge (8 items) No subdomains. Domain covers ability to listen to a story in English, tell a story, play imaginatively, articulate words, understand on first try

9 slide 9 Overall Results When looking across domains for each child ◦ Two-thirds are not At Risk in any domain

10 slide 10 Overall Results Putting all the domains together, Tulsa children are less school ready than children in other areas Category Definitions Over All Domains ◦ “At Risk”: Scoring “At Risk” on 2 or more domains ◦ “Very Ready”: Scoring “Very Ready” on 4 or more domains

11 slide 11 By District Results vary by district within Tulsa County

12 slide 12 By National School Lunch Status Differences by income can be examined within Tulsa Public Schools only using data on children’s National School Lunch Program status

13 slide 13 By Race

14 slide 14 By Race and National School Lunch Status The White-African American gap is narrowed when controlling for income (TPS data only)

15 slide 15 By Gender

16 slide 16 By Special Education

17 slide 17 Teacher Believes Child has Special Need

18 slide 18 Parent Attended Conference

19 slide 19 Parent Volunteered

20 slide 20 4-Year Old Pre-K Enrollment 4-year old Pre-K includes enrollment in the same district as Kindergarten enrollment and CAP Tulsa Pre-K

21 slide 21 4-Year Old Pre-K Enrollment 4-year old Pre-K includes enrollment in the same district as Kindergarten enrollment and CAP Tulsa Pre-K

22 slide 22 Pre-K by National School Lunch Status TPS Only 4-year old Pre-K includes enrollment in the same district as Kindergarten enrollment and CAP Tulsa Pre-K

23 slide 23 4-Year Old Pre-K Enrollment

24 slide 24 By 3- and 4-Year Old Pre-K Enrollment 3-year old Pre-K includes enrollment at CAP Tulsa and Rosa Parks ECEC Children enrolled in 3-year old Pre-K are likely of lower income; this is offsetting the impact of Pre- K 3

25 slide 25 Pre-K by National School Lunch Status TPS Only 4-year old Pre-K includes enrollment in the same district as Kindergarten enrollment and CAP Tulsa Pre-K

26 slide 26 By Who Provided 4-Year Old Pre-K CAP Tulsa attendees would have been enrolled as late as

27 slide 27 4-Year Old Pre-K Enrollment

28 slide 28 By CAP Tulsa Enrollment

29 slide 29 By 4-Year Old Bracken Score Bracken scores (available for children who attended CAP Tulsa as 4-year olds) are related to EDI scores

30 slide 30 By 4-Year Old Bracken Score Moderate correlation between Bracken and EDI (correlation coefficient is 0.41)

31 slide 31


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