Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Jim Purcell 501-371-2030 The Society, the Economy, and Education Strategies.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Jim Purcell 501-371-2030 The Society, the Economy, and Education Strategies."— Presentation transcript:

1 Jim Purcell jpurcell@adhe.edu 501-371-2030 The Society, the Economy, and Education Strategies

2 Davey Crockett "If I could rest anywhere, it would be in Arkansas, where the men are of the real half-horse, half-alligator breed such as grows nowhere else on the face of the universal earth."

3 State Per Capita Personal Income v. Share of Adult Population with Bachelor's Degree or Higher (2007) DC TX NM FL ND NC AL IN LA MI WI SD WY TN NV AR IA OH ID SC KY MS WV MO ME AZ VA NJ PA MD MT CT MA CO NE AK GA HI KSOR DE IL RIMN WA UT VT NHNY CA OK No state with a low proportion of Bachelor’s degrees has a high per capita income. No state with a high proportion of Bachelor’s degrees has a low per capita income. 2007= 19.3% 2002= 19.7% 20062005 2002 2007

4 Percent 96-97 Arkansas 9 th Grader’s Progression into High School and College (percent) 100% 71% 28% Fall 2000 College Freshmen

5 96-97 Arkansas 9 th Grader’s Progression into High School and College (number) Fall 2000 College Freshmen 100% 71% 28%

6 28,53228,532 Arkansas high school graduates How many high school graduates in Dallas/Fort Worth MSA? All of Texas US China 40,906 240,485 3,152,000 9,500,000 Competing Globally

7 Catching Up What can be done? What is possible? What are the issues? What is the solution? Will Arkansas seek to participate in the modern-global-technological society in a capacity other than being a provider of low-skilled cheap labor?

8

9 U.S. Census Bureau Data Set: Census 2000 Summary File 3 (SF 3) Arkansas ranked 51 st (16.7%) Nation-wide in 2000 for Bachelors & Higher Percent of County Population that hold Bachelors & Higher 2000 Pope 19.0% Washington 24.5% Pulaski 28.1% Clark 19.8% Benton 20.3% Faulkner 25.2% Craighead 20.9% AR was 49th (19.3%) in 2007

10 Percent of County Population (Associate Degree Holder) 2000 U.S. Census Bureau Data Set: Census 2000 Summary File 3 (SF 3) Arkansas ranked 50 th (4%) Nation-wide in 2000 for Associate Degree Holders AR was 48th (5.88%) in 2007

11 Where Arkansas Bachelors Degree (and higher) Holders live (2000) U.S. Census Bureau Data Set: Census 2000 Summary File 3 (SF 3) Arkansas ranked 51 st (16.7%) Nation-wide in 2000 for Bachelors & Higher 60% of all college AR graduates reside in 9 counties Pulaski 23.%

12 Where Arkansas Associate Degree Holders live (2000) U.S. Census Bureau Data Set: Census 2000 Summary File 3 (SF 3) Arkansas ranked 50 th (4%) Nation-wide in 2000 for Associate Degree Holders 58% of all associates degree recipients reside in 12 counties

13 Growth in Associate Degrees Awarded by Public Institutions by State from 1999-2000 to 2004-2005 SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS), "Completions" survey. Arkansas ranks 7th in the growth of associate degrees since 1999-2000

14 Growth in Bachelor’s Degrees Awarded by Public Institutions by State from 1999-2000 to 2004-2005 SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS), "Completions" survey. Arkansas ranks 11 th in the growth of bachelor’s degrees since 1999-2000

15 Degree Completion is a National Issue A generation ago the U.S. was # 1 in the world in higher education. Currently, the U.S. is #10 To regain our status and our economic competitive edge, the U.S will need to produce a million more bachelor degrees each year.

16 I know there are some who believe we can only handle one challenge at a time. They forget that Lincoln helped lay down the transcontinental railroad, passed the Homestead Act and created the National Academy of Sciences in the midst of Civil War. Likewise, President Roosevelt didn’t have the luxury of choosing between ending a depression and fighting a war. President Kennedy didn’t have the luxury of choosing between civil rights and sending us to the moon. And we don’t have the luxury of choosing between getting our economy moving now and rebuilding it over the long term… President Obama, 2009

17 President Obama's new American Graduation Initiative Goal for America: by 2020, this nation will once again have the highest proportion of college graduates in the world.

18 Goal: Arkansas will reach the Southern Regional Education Board’s (SREB) average for citizens holding bachelor’s degrees by 2015. Increase the current production of bachelor’s degrees by 64% (7,098 more graduates per year) each of the next six years to reach the SREB average. 15,343

19 Maximizing a student’s educational journey: how and when do we intervene?

20 1 st Grade6 th Grade 11 th Grade8 th GradeCollege When do we intervene? When do we intervene? We know the answer: Early Often

21 Reading Remediation Rates by County Fall 2007 % Needing Remediation First-time entering (full- and part-time) students seeking an associate or baccalaureate degree.

22 English Remediation Rates by County Fall 2007 % Needing Remediation First-time entering (full- and part-time) students seeking an associate or baccalaureate degree.

23 % Needing Remediation Math Remediation Rates by County Fall 2007 First-time entering (full- and part-time) students seeking an associate or baccalaureate degree.

24 % Needing Remediation Unduplicated Remediation Rates by County Fall 2007 First-time entering (full- and part-time) students seeking an associate or baccalaureate degree.

25 Percent of School Districts by Remediation Rates (2008 Fall) Less than 19.9%3.9% From 20%-39.9%34.5% From 40%-49.9%17.8%56.2% From 50%-59.9%19.8% From 60%-79.9%17.4% From 80%-100.0%6.6%43.8% Total100.0% 43.8% of all school districts have a remediation rate higher than 50%

26 Public School Districts with Lowest Remediation Rates (2008 Fall) DistrictStudents Entering Students Tested Students Remediated Remediation Rate ALREAD SCHOOL DISTRICT Less than 10 -0.0% HARMONY GROVE SCHOOL DISTRICT Less than 10 -0.0% SPARKMAN HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT Less than 10 -0.0% HAAS HALL ACADEMY SCHOOL DISTRICT Less than 10 12.5% QUITMAN SCHOOL DISTRICT1615 Less than 10 13.3% KINGSTON SCHOOL DISTRICT1812 Less than 10 16.7% PANGBURN SCHOOL DISTRICT2523 Less than 10 17.4% CALICO ROCK SCHOOL DISTRICT1511 Less than 10 18.2% FAYETTEVILLE SCHOOL DISTRICT2622434518.5% CENTERPOINT SCHOOL DISTRICT1716 Less than 10 18.8%

27 Public School Districts with Highest Remediation Rates (2008 Fall) DistrictStudents Entering Students Tested Students Remediated Remediation Percent BIGGERS-REYNO SCHOOL DISTRICT Less than 10 100.0% EARLE SCHOOL DISTRICT24 100.0% STAMPS SCHOOL DISTRICT Less than 10 100.0% DOLLARWAY SCHOOL DISTRICT49444397.7% DERMOTT SCHOOL DISTRICT21201995.0% OSCEOLA SCHOOL DISTRICT19181794.4% CUTTER-MORNING STAR SCH. DISTRICT22201890.0% FORREST CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT12311410188.6% TURRELL SCHOOL DISTRICT Less than 10 87.5% MARVELL SCHOOL DISTRICT17151386.7%

28 Remediation Rates Remediation Rates for All First-Time Entering Students, 2008 Fall Term, All Public Institutions 51.3% 4-Year Public Universities 39.1% 2-Year Public Colleges 74.2% Remediation Rates for First-Time Entering Adult Students (age 25 or older), 2008 Fall Term, All Public Institutions 91.0% 4-Year Public Universities 92.4% 2-Year Public Colleges 90.6%

29 Lowest and Highest Remediation Rates by Institution Lowest 4-Year Universities2-Year Colleges UAF11.3%NAC58.6% UCA30.0%ASUB59.7% HSU35.8%OZC62.2% ATU40.2%ASUMH64.2% UAFS43.0%RMCC64.2% Highest 4-Year Universities2-Year Colleges UAPB93.1%UACCH91.5% UAM63.8%PCCUA86.6% UALR50.3%ASUN86.5% SAUM50.2%SAUT86.3% ASUJ47.7%EACC85.0%

30 Cost of Remediation $53,800,000 Equivalent to the combined budget of seven of Arkansas’s community colleges.

31 College-Going Rate 2004 Fall Term60.9% 2005 Fall Term63.9% 2006 Fall Term62.0% 2007 Fall Term64.7% 2008 Fall Term63.4%

32 Percent of School Districts by College-Going Rates (2008 Fall) Less than 19.9%0.8% From 20%-39.9%8.6% From 40%-49.9%16.5%25.9% From 50%-59.9%30.5% From 60%-79.9%39.1% From 80%-100.0%4.5%74.1% Total100.0% 74.1% of all school districts have a college going rate higher than 50%

33 Public School Districts with Highest College-Going Rates Marked Tree100.0% East Poinsett County93.3% Woodlawn87.2% Cushman86.7% Norphlet85.7% McCrory84.6% Scranton81.5% Warren81.3% Cave City81.2% Delight80.8% } Calculation College-Going rates are based on a current methodology which is under review. Currently it is based upon the number of first-time entering students from a school district divided by the number of current high school graduates from that school district.

34 Public School Districts with Lowest College-Going Rates Ashdown32.3% England31.7% Hillcrest31.6% Gravette30.9% Lafayette County29.7% Foreman28.9% Harmony Grove23.1% Texarkana22.6% Genoa Central17.4% Fouke13.5% Calculation College-Going rates are based on a current methodology which is under review. Number of first-time entering students from a school district divided by the number of current high school graduates from that school district. }

35 Characteristics of high schools that produce successful students 1. Does a student’s satisfaction with their high school experience impact academic success? 2. What aspects of the high school education experience make the difference in academic success?

36 Measures of Academic Success ACT composite and subscores College going rate of High School Graduates Low Remediation Rates in College

37 Which of the following satisfaction measures were found to be correlated to Academic success? 1. Classroom Instruction 2. Number and Variety of Course Offerings 3. Grading Practices and Policies 4. Number and kinds of tests given 5. Guidance Services provided by Guidance Office 6. School Rules, Regulations and Policies 7. Library or Learning Center 8. Laboratory Facilities 9. Provisions for Special Help in Reading, Math, etc 10. Provisions for Academically Outstanding Students 11. Adequacy of Programs in Career Education Planning 12. Overall Rating of High School

38 Which of the following satisfaction measures were found to be correlated to Academic success? 1. Classroom Instruction 2. Number and Variety of Course Offerings 3. Grading Practices and Policies 4. Number and kinds of tests given 5. Guidance Services provided by Guidance Office 6. School Rules, Regulations and Policies 7. Library or Learning Center 8. Laboratory Facilities 9. Provisions for Special Help in Reading, Math, etc 10. Provisions for Academically Outstanding Students 11. Adequacy of Programs in Career Education Planning 12. Overall Rating of High School

39 survey

40 Institutional E@G Funded Scholarships are great for students receiving a scholarship, but expensive for those who do not receive the scholarship

41 A new day for Scholarships in Arkansas... and how it will change higher education

42

43

44

45

46

47

48

49

50

51 Will automate the process as much as possible including transcript retrieval, ACT/SAT score submission.

52 Training for HS Counselors CO-OP Training Session in October –3 hour training session in conjunction with ADE Available for school districts upon request State Counselor meeting in October – pre-conference session (3 hour) –1 hour session during the conference

53 Marketing Component Lottery paid advertising

54 Federal Changes $5,350Pell increased from $4,731 to $5,350 Excluded Veteran benefits from the federal financial aid package. Vet benefits also excluded from Arkansas stacking policy.

55 Encouraging Student Participation Enhance campus outreach –Increase in state financial aid applications –Increased college going rate –Reduced remediation

56 College Access Challenge Grant SayGoCollege Week, February 2010 ADHE has a grant from US DOE and Winthrop Rockefeller Foundation to promote college going and scholarships

57 SayGoCollege Week Counselor training 4 local $25,000 projects Advertising Increased NEXT publications

58 Arkansas’s Efforts toward Increasing Student Success Smart Core Curriculum in K-12 Expanded Scholarships –Revised Academic Challenge Scholarship –Revised Scholarships Need-based, near completion, nontraditional, Single-parent, Teachers Minimize tuition increases Accountability –Academic Program Quality and Viability –Seamless Transfer of AA/AS degree credits –Institutional Financial Health –Administrator Salaries –Remediation –Scholarship success

59 Higher Education Opportunities Grant Known as the “Go! Grant” Need-based grant program that provides assistance to disadvantaged students –Full-time = $1,000 per year –Part-Time = $500 per year Renewable for up to $4,000

60 Go! Grant Changes Act 1213 of 2009 Expanded to include traditional and non- traditional students Expanded to include eligibility for students enrolled in a qualified certificate program Income requirement: –$25,000 maximum AGI for one (1) in household –$5,000 increase for additional household members up to ten (10) 1,600 students last year. Currently have 5,600 students for Fall 2009 $1,300,000 last year. Is over $5,000,000 so far.

61 Arkansas Academic Challenge

62 Increase participation of direct-from-high- school students from 3,400 to 11,707 annually Increase total participation rate from 8,087 to 33,490 Revised Academic Challenge

63 Arkansas Academic Challenge Scholarship 2 parts –Traditional –Nontraditional

64 General Eligibility Requirements U.S. Citizen or Permanent Resident Alien Arkansas Resident Eligible Arkansas Institution Satisfactory Academic Standing Continuing Eligibility Requirements

65 Academic Challenge Scholarship (Lottery Scholarship) Scholarships awarded under the Academic Challenge Part 2 will begin Fall 2010 NO INCOME REQUIREMENT Aligned with Smart Core *** Basic eligibility criteria –Traditional Students Accepted for admission at an approved institution of higher education as a full-time student in a program of study that leads to a baccalaureate degree, associate degree, qualified certificate or a nursing school diploma Applicant must complete the FAFSA

66 Academic Challenge Scholarship (Lottery Scholarship) –Traditional Student requirements (cont..) Must meet one of the following criteria: Graduate from an Arkansas public high school, successfully complete the Smart Core curriculum and achieve a 2.5 high school GPA OR obtain a 19 on the ACT (before 2014 -- IF no Smart Core), Graduate from an Arkansas public high school achieve a 2.5 high school GPA AND obtain a 19 on the ACT OR score proficient on all state-mandated end-of- course assessments If student graduates from an Arkansas public high school that is identified as a school in which 20% or more of the students received a letter grade of “B” or higher but did not score proficient of higher on the end-of-course assessment, the student must achieve a 2.5 high school GPA AND obtain a 19 on the ACT OR score proficient on all state-mandated end-of-course assessments Grade Inflation Clause

67 Academic Challenge Scholarship (Lottery Scholarship) If a student has a disability identified under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and graduated from an Arkansas public high school but did not complete the Smart Core because of the applicant’s individualized education program, the student must achieve a 2.5 high school GPA AND obtain a 19 on the ACT OR score proficient on all state-mandated end-of-course assessments Graduate from a private, out-of-state high school or home school and achieve a 19 on the ACT

68 Arkansas Educational Attainment (2006) Population 25 years and over1,847,325100.00% Less than 9th grade136,1437.37% 9th to 12th grade, no diploma223,90612.12% High school graduate (includes equivalency)671,50036.35% Some college, no degree378,53420.49% Associate's degree100,6195.45% Bachelor's degree221,23311.98% Graduate or professional degree115,3906.25% 2006

69 Limited Funds for Nontraditional Students Majority of Scholarship funds are targeted to students directly out of high school Nontraditional student funding: –8 Million for 2010-2011 (about 15% of the projected 53 million of lottery revenue) –In future years, ADHE will recommend more or less depending on usage of the scholarship and lottery revenue

70 Nontraditional Student Interest in Scholarship More interest than funds available 378,000 (20%) of Arkansans over age 25 have some college and no degree 165,000 currently enrolled undergraduate students Year 1 Maximum Funds Authorized $8,000,000 Prioritization of Nontraditional Student Applicant for the Scholarships Near-completers Delayed Returner Earn-In A.C.A. §6-85-204 (11) "Nontraditional student" means a student who is not a traditional student; (17) "Traditional student" means a student who will enter postsecondary education as a full-time first-time freshman within twelve (12) months after graduating from high school and remains continuously enrolled as a full-time student. Thus, Nontraditional students includes all these subgroups:

71 Distribution of funds to nontraditional students Student applies for the Arkansas Academic Challenge via the universal application Indicates they are desiring to attend a CC or University ReturningDelayedEarn-in Different buckets of funds CC students would compete with CC students University Students would compete with University Students Delayed: 1/3 1. Priority given to those not requiring remediation 2.ACT/SAT/ Compass or equivalent score 3.Financial Need (EFC) Returning: 1/3 1.Priority given to those Nearest to Completion 2.Completed or not requiring remediation 3.Enrolled/Admitted in workforce critical-needs program 4.College GPA 5.Financial Need (EFC) Earn-In: 1/3 1.Priority given to those Nearest to Completion 2.At a Univ - a nontrad transfer with AA/AS/AAS 3.Completed or not requiring remediation 4.Enrolled/Admitted in workforce critical-needs program 5.College GPA 6.Financial Need (EFC) $$$ divided equally among nontraditional categories

72 civic involvement volunteer activity by education levels Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2003). Volunteering in the United States, 2003. USDL03-888. U.S. Department of Labor. 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Less Than High School Diploma High School Diploma Some College B.A. or Higher 9.9% (48 hours) 21.7% (48 hours) 34.1% (52 hours) 45.6% (60 hours) Percentage Volunteering

73 blood donation by education level, 1994: Source: DBD Worldwide. (2000). DBD Lifestyle Survey. Chicago. Available at www.bowlingalone.com.www.bowlingalone.com 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% Less Than High School Diploma High School Diploma Some College B.A. or Higher 6% 11% 13% 17% Percentage Donating Blood percentage who donate regularly civic involvement

74 participation assistance programs Source: Postsecondary Education Opportunity, May 28, 1997, pg 47. Less Than High School Diploma High School Diploma Some College & Bachelor’s Degree or More 24.3% 10.2% 4.6% Ever Participated in Assistance Programs education level government

75 incarceration rates by education levels 2.5% 2.0% 1.5% 1.0% 0.5% 0.0% Less Than High School Diploma High School Diploma Some College B.A. or Higher 1.9% 1.2% 0.3% 0.1% Percentage Incarcerated Source: Harlow, C.W. (2003). Education and Correctional Populations. Bureau of Justice Statistics, Department of Justice. NCJ195670.

76 economic Percent Below Poverty Threshold, 2004 economic Percent Below Poverty Threshold, 2004 Census Bureau 40% 30% 10% 0% Less Than High School Diploma High School Diploma Some College B.A. or Higher 32% 15% 10% 4% Percentage Home Ownership 20%

77 economic unemployment rates and education level, 2004 Source: Employment Policy Institute 10 8 6 4 2 0 Less Than High School Diploma High School Diploma Some College B.A. or Higher 9.7% 7.5% 5.1% 4.6%

78 Quality of Life Home Ownership Census Bureau, American Housing Survey for the United States:2005 80% 70% 60% 50% Less Than High School Diploma High School Diploma Some College B.A. or Higher 58% 69% 66% 75% Percentage Home Ownership

79 Seatbelt Use while intoxicated, 1990 Source: American Journal of Public Health 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% Less Than High School Diploma High School Diploma Some College B.A. or Higher 39% 41% 52% 66% Percentage Donating Blood percentage who use seatbelt Safety 15% 20% 31% 78%

80 economic Average family income by educational attainment, 2003 Source: Postsecondary Education Opportunity, 2005 25 175 50 100 75 125 150 0 LT-99-12HSG Some Prof MA PhDBAAA Income ($000) College

81 3,798,9405,254,193Professional degree 2,527,3243,982,577Doctorate 1,507,8232,963,076Master's degree $1,111,921$2,567,174Bachelor's degree 346,1201,801,373Associate degree 270,5691,725,822Some college, no degree 01,455,253High school graduate -304,5551,150,698High school dropout -$478,903$976,350Less than 9th grade Difference Compared to High School Graduate Estimated Lifetime Earnings Education Level Source: Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, 2005 The Impact of Education on Individuals: Lifetime Earnings economic

82 Nearly all economic growth and prosperity for individuals, families, cities, states, and the country is now driven by college educated workers. Those individuals, families, cities, states and – increasingly—countries with the most education are prospering, while those with the least higher education are experiencing relative and often absolute economic decline. --Postsecondary Education OPPORTUNITY, June 2005. Time and Place

83 At the end of WWII, the U.S made a bold decision to invest in the future of its economy by providing $1.9 billion annually to the education of returning veterans of the war. This commitment to human capital helped enable the WWII generation to become the “greatest generation.” Possibly, Arkansas’s greatest generation is at the schoolhouse door waiting for the opportunity to propel Arkansas into the global economy.

84 Jim Purcell jpurcell@adhe.edu 501-371-2030


Download ppt "Jim Purcell 501-371-2030 The Society, the Economy, and Education Strategies."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google