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Integrated Curriculum, Differentiated Instruction and Understanding by Design Connecting Content and Kids.

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Presentation on theme: "Integrated Curriculum, Differentiated Instruction and Understanding by Design Connecting Content and Kids."— Presentation transcript:

1 Integrated Curriculum, Differentiated Instruction and Understanding by Design Connecting Content and Kids

2 UbD and DI: An Essential Partnership Integrating Differentiated Instruction + Understanding by Design: Connecting Content and Kids by Carol Ann Tomlinson and Jay McTighe

3 “In effective classrooms, teachers consistently attend to at least four elements: 1.whom they teach (students), 2.where they teach (learning environment), 3.what they teach (content), and 4.how they teach (instruction). If teachers lose sight of any one of the elements and cease investing effort in it, the whole fabric of their work is damaged and the quality of learning impaired.” Read Chapter One

4 Teaching is an Integrated Process Curriculum Assessment Learning Environment Instruction

5 1.The primary goal of quality curriculum design is to develop and deepen student understanding. 2.Evidence of student understanding is revealed when students apply (transfer) knowledge in authentic contexts. 3.Effective curriculum development following the principles of backward design helps avoid the twin problems of textbook coverage and activity- oriented teaching in which no clear priorities and purposes are apparent. 4.Regular reviews of curriculum and assessment designs, based on design standards, provide quality control and inform needed adjustments. Regular reviews of “results” (i.e., student achievement) should be followed by needed adjustments to curriculum and instruction. 5.Teachers provide opportunities for students to explore, interpret, apply, shift perspectives, empathize, and self-assess. These six facets provide conceptual lenses through which student understanding is assessed. 6.Teachers, students, and districts benefit by “working smarter” and using technology and other vehicles to collaboratively design, share, and critique units of study. 7.UbD is not a program, but a way of thinking, not a program. with the goal of promoting better student understanding.

6 The Big Ideas of UbD UbD Big IdeaWhat’s the PointIf not… Backward Design Plans need to be well aligned to be effective Aimless activity and coverage Transfer as Goal It is the essence of understanding and the point of schooling Students fail to apply; poor learning Understanding via Big Idea That’s how transfer happens, makes learning more connected Learning is fragmented; more difficult, less engaging Meaningful learning That’s what is most engaging and inviting You lose many kids over time UbD is not a program, but a way of thinking, with the goal of promoting better student understanding.

7 What Really Matters in Teaching? Students

8 Categories of Student Variance Contributors to the Category Biology Gender Neurological “wiring” for learning Abilities Disabilities Development Degree of Privilege Economic status Race Culture Support system Language Experience Positioning for learning Adult models Trust Self-concept Motivation Temperament Interpersonal skills Preference/ Learning Styles Interests Learning preferences Preferences for individuals Categories of Student Variance with Contributors that have some Implications for Learning

9 How do we get our students to Learn? To Think? KNOWINGUNDERSTANDING

10 What Really Matters in Learning Content

11 Integration: An ESU Contribution Relationship between and among disciplines and bodies of knowledge Reading, writing and creating are ways to organize thinking and knowing Children learn better and more deeply if learning is connected Integration provides multiple entry points for diverse learners Integration supports authentic work, personal engagement and understanding

12 Important Questions for Planning How can we promote UNDERSTANDING more by design than by good fortune? How do you know when they “GOT IT”? What is and isn’t evidence of UNDERSTANDING? How do we move beyond designing merely interesting activities or textbook coverage? How do we teach for UNDERSTANDING?

13 Six Facets of Understanding How do we know what we really understand?

14 When we truly understand we can:  Explain – Provide theories, ‘the why’  Interpret – Meaning, stories, translations  Apply – Use and adapt what we know in diverse contexts  Perspective – Other points of view, critical stance; zoom in/out  Empathize – “Walk in the shoes of…”  Self-Knowledge – Wisdom, “knowing thyself”, aware of prejudice

15 Where do we begin the Unit? Step 1 - IDENTIFY DESIRED RESULTS  BEGIN WITH THE END IN MIND!  DO IT FIRST; DO IT WELL Step 2 - DETERMINE ACCEPTABLE EVIDENCE  CLARIFIES WHAT LEARNING LOOKS LIKE IN THIS UNIT OF INSTRUCTION FOR ALL STUDENTS  Step 3 - PLAN DIFFERENTIATED EXPERIENCES AND INSTRUCTION  DETERMINES THE LEVEL OF STUDENT ENGAGEMENT AND DEPTH OF UNDERSTANDING Step 4 - SET THE STAGE FOR LEARNING  PROVIDES THE SUPPORT & RESOURCES FOR LEARNING IN THROUGHOUT THE UNIT

16 - Design Template Should not be differentiated May be differentiated Should be differentiated

17 Stage 1: Identifying Desired Results What is worthy and requiring of understanding?

18 Big Idea EXPLORATION Enduring Understanding Essential Questions Learning Goals & Standards STAGE ONE: What is worthy of knowing?

19 Stage 1: Key Design Elements How can we unpack the goals (e.g. content standards, district goals) to derive big ideas? What “big ideas” do we want students to come to understand? What essential questions and understandings will stimulate and promote inquiry? What knowledge and skills need to be acquired given the understandings and related content standards?

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21 Big Ideas: What are they? Is it a Big Idea? –A core idea or process at the “heart” of the discipline? –Enduring – has lasting value? –Connecting Idea – Will it help link discrete facts/skills, disciplines? –Require “uncoverage” (it is often abstract or a misunderstood idea) –Transferable to other topics?

22 Stage 1: Identifying Desired Results Decide on the essential questions and Big Idea Questions which point to the big ideas and deepen inquiry? Identify what is important to know and do Create learning goals for each topic, use enabling words  Check national, state, and district standards  Possible regional topic opportunities  Teacher expertise and interest Isolate the “enduring understanding” A generalization that connects to the “Big Idea” and cuts across and integrates learning goals  Must incorporate and value each topics for an integrated unit - Content is set of linked ideas  Take the filter test: Important to know as an adult? Integral to discipline’s process or product? Something to uncover? Inherently engaging to students?

23 Select a BIG IDEA(s) - An abstract and transferable concept, theme or process at the hear of a subject or topic Abundance or capacity Acceptance or rejection Adaptation Aging or maturity Balance Challenge Change or continuity Character Communities Conflict Connections Conservation Cooperation Correlation Courage Creativity Culture Cycles Mood Order patterns Perspective Production or consumption Proof Survival Relationships Repetition Rhythm Structures Survival Sustainability Systems Democracy Tyranny Wealth OTHERS? Defense or protection Democracy Discovery Diversity Environments Equilibrium Evolution Exploration Fabrication Fairness Harmony Honor Interactions Interdependence Invention Justice Liberty Loyalty Migration

24 From Big Ideas to Understandings and Essential Questions Understandings What specific insights will students take away about the meaning of “content” via big ideas? Understandings summarize the desired insights we want students to realize Understandings make sense of facts, skill, and ideas: they tell us what our knowledge means, connect the dots Essential Questions Important, provocative question that recur throughout our lives Core ideas and inquiries within the discipline Helps students effectively inquire and make sense of the big idea(s) and requires students to make decisions about answers Engages a specific and diverse of learners

25 Knowledge Skills Vocabulary/terminology Definitions Key factual information Critical details Important events and people Sequence/timeline Basic skills- e.g. decoding, drawing Communication skills – e.g. listening, speaking, writing Research/inquiry/ investigation skills Thinking skills – e.g. comparing, problem solving, decision making Study skills – e.g. note taking Interpersonal, Group skills

26 Stage 2: Determine Acceptable Evidence What is Evidence of Understanding?

27 STAGE 2: Determine Acceptable Evidence Think like an Assessor! What is the purpose for assessment? Diagnostic, Formative, or Summative Refer back to Stage 1: Enduring Understandings, Essential Questions, learning goals? Who are your learners? What methods and scoring tools will show understanding? Consider a wide range of assessment methods and scoring tools. Anchor assessment with performance tasks or projects; use traditional assessments to round out the picture Assessment filters? Valid, reliable, sufficient, feasible, authentic work, student friendly

28 Collect Acceptable & Sufficient Evidence May be differentiated

29 Summative Project: Create an Authentic “performances of understanding” G - a real-world goal R - a meaningful role for the student A - authentic, or simulated real-world audience(s) S - a conceptualized situation that involve real-world application P - student generated culminating products and performances S - consensus driven performance standards (criteria) for judging success

30 STAGE 2: Thinking Process WHAT IS EVIDENCE OF UNDERSTANDING? 1. Determine the Performance task or Project = Summative Assessment Method 2. Isolate key criteria for assessing summative performance or project – Create a Rubric for Summative Project! - May be differentiated 3. Select supportive Assessments: Formative Assessments - while learning Diagnostic Assessments - before learning 4. Isolate criteria and develop tools for supportive assessments methods - May be differentiated

31 ASSESSMENT PLANNING KEEP IN MIND... Purpose: Diagnostic, Formative, Summative Student Outcomes/Learning Goals Learner Characteristics Assessment Methods Case StudyCharts ChecklistDemonstrations EssayExams &Quizzes ExhibitionsGraphic Organizers Group ProjectGuided Response InterviewsJournal or Log Open Response Performance ObservationProblem-solving ProductProject Portfolio Rubric Research PaperShort Answer Scoring Tools Chart Checklist Graphic Organizer Rubrics Scales Exam/Quiz Key Observation with criteria

32 Stage 3: Plan Differentiated Experiences & Instruction What learning experiences and instruction promote engagement, understanding and achievement for ALL students?

33 Stage 3: Plan Differentiated Experiences & Instruction 1.Use the learning cycle to sequence experiences within and across disciplines Awareness Exploration Elaboration Utilization 2. Select a variety of highly effective strategies from research-based repertoire of teaching strategies 3.Differentiate instruction to accommodate for advanced learners, learners and struggling learners 4.Check connection to Stage 1: enduring understanding and essential questions, learning goals.

34 The Learning Cycle Awareness Exploration Elaboration Utilization

35 UbD Instructional Plan Awareness Read/W rite Social Studies Science Visual Art Modifications Exploration Elaboration Utilizaiton

36 SELECT Research Based Instructional Strategies

37 INSTRUCTION Must be Differentiated for Diverse Learners

38 Stage 4: Set the Stage for Learning How will the learning environment support, stimulate, inspire and validate student learning?

39 Stage 4: Set the Stage for Learning Plan an Integrated Learning Center  Draw the center design and add appropriate modifications or assistive technologies Identify where and how will you communicate and share student learning with others including process and products List the resources, artifacts, and materials you need to successfully teach this unit.  Identify which artists and/or works of art support visual literacy and connections to other disciplines.  Determine the children’s literature needed to support the curriculum content and verbal literacy - leveled books.  Select other materials, games, artifacts you may need to support learning of all students.

40 Where to Begin Your Unit? Step 1 - IDENTIFY DESIRED RESULTS  KEY STEP FOR THE ENTIRE UNIT - BEGIN WITH THE END IN MIND!  DO IT FIRST; DO IT WELL Step 2 - DETERMINE ACCEPTABLE EVIDENCE  CLARIFIES WHAT LEARNING LOOKS LIKE IN THIS UNIT OF INSTRUCTION  Step 3 - PLAN EXPERIENCES AND INSTRUCTION  DETERMINES THE LEVEL OF STUDENT ENGAGEMENT AND DEPTH OF UNDERSTANDING Step 4 - SET THE STAGE FOR LEARNING  PROVIDES THE SUPPORT & RESOURCES FOR LEARNING IN THIS UNIT


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