Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Gary Bailey,MSW,ACSW To Be or Not to Be: Discovering Similarities and Celebrating Differences: Gary Bailey, MSW.ACSW Presented at NERSC Burlington, Vermont.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Gary Bailey,MSW,ACSW To Be or Not to Be: Discovering Similarities and Celebrating Differences: Gary Bailey, MSW.ACSW Presented at NERSC Burlington, Vermont."— Presentation transcript:

1 gary Bailey,MSW,ACSW To Be or Not to Be: Discovering Similarities and Celebrating Differences: Gary Bailey, MSW.ACSW Presented at NERSC Burlington, Vermont May 29,2009

2 gary Bailey,MSW,ACSW It is not our differences that divide us; It is our inability to recognize, accept & celebrate those differences" It is not our differences that divide us; It is our inability to recognize, accept & celebrate those differences" Audre Lorde Audre Lorde

3 gary Bailey,MSW,ACSW Three Components of Today's Presentation What Diversity is and is not; What Diversity is and is not; Diversity as a component of managing organizational/systems change; Diversity as a component of managing organizational/systems change; How to have Difficult Conversations How to have Difficult Conversations

4 gary Bailey,MSW,ACSW … even though the concept of diversity was introduced as a kind of end run around the historical problem of racism (the whole point was that you could argue for the desirability of a diverse student body without appealing to the history of discrimination against blacks and do so without getting accused by people like Alan Bakke of reverse discrimination against Whites), the commitment to diversity became deeply associated with the struggle against racism … even though the concept of diversity was introduced as a kind of end run around the historical problem of racism (the whole point was that you could argue for the desirability of a diverse student body without appealing to the history of discrimination against blacks and do so without getting accused by people like Alan Bakke of reverse discrimination against Whites), the commitment to diversity became deeply associated with the struggle against racism

5 gary Bailey,MSW,ACSW indeed, the goal of overcoming racism -- of creating a color-blind society -- was now reconceived as the goal of creating a diverse, that is, a color-conscious, society indeed, the goal of overcoming racism -- of creating a color-blind society -- was now reconceived as the goal of creating a diverse, that is, a color-conscious, society instead of trying to treat people as if their race didn't matter, we would not only recognize but celebrate racial identity. Indeed, race has turned out to be a gateway drug for all kinds of identities, cultural, religious, sexual, even medical. instead of trying to treat people as if their race didn't matter, we would not only recognize but celebrate racial identity. Indeed, race has turned out to be a gateway drug for all kinds of identities, cultural, religious, sexual, even medical.

6 gary Bailey,MSW,ACSW To take what may seem like an extreme case, advocates for the disabled now urge us to stop thinking of disability as a condition to be cured or eliminated and to start thinking of it instead on the model of race: We don't think black people should want to stop being black; why do we assume the deaf want to hear? To take what may seem like an extreme case, advocates for the disabled now urge us to stop thinking of disability as a condition to be cured or eliminated and to start thinking of it instead on the model of race: We don't think black people should want to stop being black; why do we assume the deaf want to hear? Michaels, W. B. (2006). The trouble with diversity. The American Prospect, 17(9),

7 gary Bailey,MSW,ACSW Micro-aggressions/ Micro-inequities Good people can do bad things to others in ways for which there is no formal grievance, but still have negative (sometimes unintentionally) effect. This refers to micro-aggressions or micro- inequities. Good people can do bad things to others in ways for which there is no formal grievance, but still have negative (sometimes unintentionally) effect. This refers to micro-aggressions or micro- inequities.

8 gary Bailey,MSW,ACSW Micro-inequities are: those tiny, damaging characteristics of an environment, as these characteristics affect a person not of that environment. They are the comments, the work assignments, the tone of voice, the failure of acknowledgement in meetings or social gatherings. These are not actionable violations of law or policies, but they are clear, subtle indicators of lack of respect by virtue of membership in a group (Rowe, 1990) those tiny, damaging characteristics of an environment, as these characteristics affect a person not of that environment. They are the comments, the work assignments, the tone of voice, the failure of acknowledgement in meetings or social gatherings. These are not actionable violations of law or policies, but they are clear, subtle indicators of lack of respect by virtue of membership in a group (Rowe, 1990)

9 gary Bailey,MSW,ACSW Managing Organizational Transitions Change happens when something starts or stops,or when something that used to happen in one way starts happening in another

10 gary Bailey,MSW,ACSW Managing Organizational Transitions Transition is a three part psychological process which extends over a long period of time and cannot be planned or managed by the same rational formulae that work with change; Transition is a three part psychological process which extends over a long period of time and cannot be planned or managed by the same rational formulae that work with change;

11 gary Bailey,MSW,ACSW Managing Organizational Transitions: What to Do? 1. They have to let go of the old situation and of the old identity that went with it; 2. They have to go through the neutral zone between their old reality and a new reality that may still be very unclear; 3. They have to make a new beginning that is much more than the relatively simple new start required in a change process; Bridges, W. (1986). Managing organizational transitions. Organizational Dynamics 15 (1), Bridges, W. (1986). Managing organizational transitions. Organizational Dynamics 15 (1),

12 gary Bailey,MSW,ACSW Nine Keys to Good Leadership Vision Vision Management Management Empowerment Empowerment Diplomacy Diplomacy Feedback Feedback Entrepreneurialism Entrepreneurialism Personal Style Personal Style Personal Energy Personal Energy Multicultural Awareness Multicultural Awareness Campbell, D. (2002). Campbell leadership descriptor Participant workbook, San Francisco: Jessey-Bass/Pfeiffer.

13 gary Bailey,MSW,ACSW A Residents Perspective…..? A Residents Perspective…..? experience is, for me, the highest authority. The touchstone of validity is my own experience. No other person's ideas, and none of my own ideas, are as authoritative as my experience. It is to experience that I must return again and again, to discover a closer approximation to truth as it is in the process of becoming in me. Neither the Bible nor the prophets -- neither Freud nor research --neither the revelations of God nor man -- can take precedence over my own direct experience. My experience is not authoritative because it is infallible. It is the basis of authority because it can always be checked in new primary ways. In this way its frequent error or fallibility is always open to correction."

14 gary Bailey,MSW,ACSW Difficult Conversations: A Road Map

15 gary Bailey,MSW,ACSW Step 1: Prepare by Walking Through the Three Conversations Sort out What Happened. Sort out What Happened. Where does your story come from (information, past experiences, rules) Theirs ? Where does your story come from (information, past experiences, rules) Theirs ? What impact has this situation had on you? What might their intentions have been? What impact has this situation had on you? What might their intentions have been? What have you each contributed to the problem? What have you each contributed to the problem?

16 gary Bailey,MSW,ACSW Step 1: Prepare by Walking Through the Three Conversations (cont) Understand Emotions. Understand Emotions. Explore your emotional footprint, and the bundle of emotions you experience. Explore your emotional footprint, and the bundle of emotions you experience. Ground Your Identity. Ground Your Identity. Whats at stake for you about you? What do you need to accept to be better grounded Whats at stake for you about you? What do you need to accept to be better grounded

17 gary Bailey,MSW,ACSW Step 2: Check Your Purposes and Decide Whether to Raise the Issue Purposes: What do you hope to accomplish by having this conversation? Shift your stand to support learning, sharing, and problem-solving. Purposes: What do you hope to accomplish by having this conversation? Shift your stand to support learning, sharing, and problem-solving. Deciding: Is this the best way to address the issue and achieve Conversation? Can you affect the problem by changing your contributions? If you dont raise it, what can you do to help yourself let go? Deciding: Is this the best way to address the issue and achieve Conversation? Can you affect the problem by changing your contributions? If you dont raise it, what can you do to help yourself let go?

18 gary Bailey,MSW,ACSW Step 3: Start from the Third Story Describe the problem as the difference between your stories. Include both viewpoints as a legitimate part of the discussion. Describe the problem as the difference between your stories. Include both viewpoints as a legitimate part of the discussion. Share your purposes. Share your purposes. Invite them to join you as a partner in sorting out the situation together. Invite them to join you as a partner in sorting out the situation together.

19 gary Bailey,MSW,ACSW Step 4: Explore Their Story and Yours Listen to understand their perspective on what happened. Ask questions. Acknowledge the feelings behind the arguments and accusations. Paraphrase to see if youve got it. Try to unravel how the two of you got to this place. Listen to understand their perspective on what happened. Ask questions. Acknowledge the feelings behind the arguments and accusations. Paraphrase to see if youve got it. Try to unravel how the two of you got to this place. Share your own viewpoint, your past experience, intentions, feelings. Share your own viewpoint, your past experience, intentions, feelings. Reframe, reframe, reframe to keep on track. From truth to perceptions, blame to contribution, accusations to feelings, and so on. Reframe, reframe, reframe to keep on track. From truth to perceptions, blame to contribution, accusations to feelings, and so on.

20 gary Bailey,MSW,ACSW Step 5: Problem-Solving Invent options that meet each sides most important concerns and interests. Invent options that meet each sides most important concerns and interests. Look to standards for what should happen. Keep in mind the standard of mutual caretaking: relationships that always go one way rarely last. Look to standards for what should happen. Keep in mind the standard of mutual caretaking: relationships that always go one way rarely last. Talk about how to keep communication open as you go forward. Talk about how to keep communication open as you go forward.

21 gary Bailey,MSW,ACSW Transparency :The Clear Path to Leadership Credibility 1. Being Overwhelmingly Honest 2. Gathering Intelligence 3. Being Composed 4. Letting Your Guard Down 5. Keeping Promises

22 gary Bailey,MSW,ACSW 6. Properly Handling Mistakes 7. Delivering Bad News Well 8. Avoiding Destructive Comments 9. Showing Others That You Care Walker, K. & Pagano, B. Transparency: The Clear Path to Leadership Credibility, Linkage, Inc. Link&Learn eNewsletter (January 2005).

23 gary Bailey,MSW,ACSW Leading From Within: the Shadow Side of Leadership Great leadership comes from people who have made a downward journey through violence and terror, who have touched the deep place where we are in community with each other, and who can help take other people to that place. That is what great leadership is all about. Great leadership comes from people who have made a downward journey through violence and terror, who have touched the deep place where we are in community with each other, and who can help take other people to that place. That is what great leadership is all about.

24 gary Bailey,MSW,ACSW Questions for Discussion: Questions for Discussion: How many of you have seen opportunities for inter-personal micro-dialogues about race/diversity in your daily lives? How many of you have seen opportunities for inter-personal micro-dialogues about race/diversity in your daily lives? How many of these opportunities have you seen this week? How many of these opportunities have you seen this week? How would you describe what some of these opportunity are or were ? How would you describe what some of these opportunity are or were ? Were they with people who were like you or different from you? Were they with people who were like you or different from you? What kept you from engaging and initiating these dialogues? What kept you from engaging and initiating these dialogues? What helped you to engage and initiate these dialogues What helped you to engage and initiate these dialogues Does the presence or absence of diverse colleagues and clients change the discussion about race/diversity Does the presence or absence of diverse colleagues and clients change the discussion about race/diversity What did you notice about what you noticed? What did you notice about what you noticed?


Download ppt "Gary Bailey,MSW,ACSW To Be or Not to Be: Discovering Similarities and Celebrating Differences: Gary Bailey, MSW.ACSW Presented at NERSC Burlington, Vermont."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google