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Caribbean Conference on Comprehensive Disaster ManagementCDM: Strengthening Partnerships for Resilience Montego Bay, St. James, Jamaica December 6 10,

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Presentation on theme: "Caribbean Conference on Comprehensive Disaster ManagementCDM: Strengthening Partnerships for Resilience Montego Bay, St. James, Jamaica December 6 10,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Caribbean Conference on Comprehensive Disaster ManagementCDM: Strengthening Partnerships for Resilience Montego Bay, St. James, Jamaica December 6 10, Presenter: Georgia Scarlett Project Assistant Office of Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management L Sweat Equity in Recovery Projects: The Case of the Tropical Storm Gustav Recovery Project

2 OUTLINE Contextual Background The Project Sweat Equity Issues and Challenges Partnerships Benefits The Way Forward Conclusion

3 INTRODUCTION Caribbean States are highly vulnerable to natural disasters where, on average one major hurricane affects a country in the region every two years.

4 Over the past 20 years, Jamaica's disasters resulted in cumulative costs of more than US$84 billion. The World Bank's Natural Disaster Hotspots Report ranks Jamaica as the country third most exposed to multiple hazards in the world, with 87.7% of GDP and 87.7% of the population in areas at risk from three or more hazards INTRODUCTION

5 Tropical Storm Gustav In August 2008 Tropical Storm Gustav entered into Caribbean Waters causing catastrophic damages to Jamaica on August 28-29

6 IMPACT communities affected 2. 4,000 individuals directly affected reported deaths houses totally destroyed 5. 1,500 houses severely damaged Tropical Storm Gustav

7 The Office of Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management (ODPEM), based on multi-sector damage and needs assessments, estimated losses from Gustav at J$15 billion Jamaican dollars (approx £115 million). Tropical Storm Gustav

8 Tropical Storm Gustav Recovery Project The Jamaican Government met the needs of the 400 homeless but could not meet that of the 1500 severely affected. The Department for International Development (DFID) sought to assist this population through a grant of £500,

9 Project Objectives To assist the recovery of 1500 families severely affected by Tropical Storm Gustav and to prepare for and mitigate against, the effects of future natural hazards on low income and self help housing sectors in Jamaica. Tropical Storm Gustav Recovery Project

10 Project Objectives 2. Provide materials and technical assistance to repair up to 1500 homes. Tropical Storm Gustav Recovery Project

11 Project Objectives 3. Train 120 Household owners and artisan builders in building resilient low income self- help housing. Tropical Storm Gustav Recovery Project

12 Project Objectives 4. Conduct a national safer building awareness programme Tropical Storm Gustav Recovery Project

13 Achievements 1103 houses retrofitted 5 houses constructed 235 informal builders and householders trained in Safer building techniques A National Hazard Awareness Campaign, launched on August

14 METHODOLOGY To achieve the project objectives sweat equity was incorporated

15 Sweat Equity Definition The voluntary contribution (Labour) that beneficiaries expend as a pre- requisite prior to the provision of receiving any tangible benefits.

16 Sweat Equity Employed by Agencies worldwide such as the Habitat for Humanity. In Jamaica- the Jamaica Social Investment Fund (JSIF) is the main agency that requires beneficiaries to participate in the form of contributing labour to gain benefits from these organisations

17 Sweat Equity Sweat equity creates a mutually beneficially relationship between the recipient and the donor.

18 ODPEMs Main Provisions 1. Skilled artisans ( Learners from the HEART TRUST/NTA) 2. Safer building materials

19 Beneficiary Main Provisions 1. Artisans ( 2-3 community carpenters) 2. Meals for all artisans 3. All manual handling of materials

20 PARTICIPATION AND INCLUSION Communities were informed of their sweat equity provision from the implementation phase of the Project. Together both the beneficiaries and ODPEM worked to achieve success.

21 PARTNERSHIPS Community Leaders Parish Councils ( Parish Disaster Coordinators) HEART TRUST/NTA

22 ISSUES AND CHALLENGES Challenges were experienced in all phases of the Project: Pre-implementation Implementation Post implementation

23 Pre-Implementation Phase 1. Residents were cynical about the Project. 2. Residents were reluctant to carry out any form of sweat equity. 3. Some residents were unable to carry out sweat equity.

24 Pre-Implementation Phase 1. Residents were cynical about the Project. 2. Residents were reluctant to carry out any form of sweat equity. 3. Some residents were unable to carry out sweat equity.

25 Implementation Phase 1. Initial refusal to cover double handling costs. 2. Low community artisan turn out in some communities. 3. Threats of violence, unpleasant meals and general unwillingness.

26 Post Implementation Phase 1. Financial expectation of some residents 2. Perceived ingratitude as some residents wanted a complete re-roofing rather than retrofitting.

27 BENEFITS 5. Community residents are active participants in the Project implementation process therefore achieving behaviour change at this level. 6. Builds community bonds and encourages camaraderie.

28 The Way Forward The concept should be utilized in all post disaster projects.

29 CONCLUSION Sweat equity has proven successful in this Recovery Project. Together communities, Implementing Agencies and Donors can work together in building disaster resilient communities when employing sweat equity


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