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3 Paragraph Synthesising Example "Is the expansion of Higher Education desirable?"

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Presentation on theme: "3 Paragraph Synthesising Example "Is the expansion of Higher Education desirable?""— Presentation transcript:

1 3 Paragraph Synthesising Example "Is the expansion of Higher Education desirable?"

2 Text #1 Since the beginning of the twentieth century, the trend in higher education has been one of expansion. This is true not only in Europe and America, but also all around the world. Statistics show that in 1900, only 2% of the population of Europe attended university; by 1939, this had reached 14%, and by 1991, the figure had risen to 29%. Similarly, in Africa, figures for the same years show a rise from 0.3% to 2.5% and finally to 9%. This clearly shows that more and more people are going on to university after school. Now, the British Prime Minister, Tony Blair, says that he wants 50% of all school students to go to university. This sounds like a fine plan, but what are the implications? Richard Woolmer, Trends, Full Press, Manchester, p.10

3 Text #1 – Main Idea 1 Since the beginning of the twentieth century, the trend in higher education has been one of expansion. This is true not only in Europe and America, but also all around the world. Statistics show that in 1900, only 2% of the population of Europe attended university; by 1939, this had reached 14%, and by 1991, the figure had risen to 29%. Similarly, in Africa, figures for the same years show a rise from 0.3% to 2.5% and finally to 9%. This clearly shows that more and more people are going on to university after school. Now, the British Prime Minister, Tony Blair, says that he wants 50% of all school students to go to university. This sounds like a fine plan, but what are the implications? Richard Woolmer, Trends, Full Press, Manchester, p.10

4 Text #1 – Main Idea 2 Since the beginning of the twentieth century, the trend in higher education has been one of expansion. This is true not only in Europe and America, but also all around the world. Statistics show that in 1900, only 2% of the population of Europe attended university; by 1939, this had reached 14%, and by 1991, the figure had risen to 29%. Similarly, in Africa, figures for the same years show a rise from 0.3% to 2.5% and finally to 9%. This clearly shows that more and more people are going on to university after school. Now, the British Prime Minister, Tony Blair, says that he wants 50% of all school students to go to university. This sounds like a fine plan, but what are the implications? Richard Woolmer, Trends, Full Press, Manchester, p.10

5 Text #1 – Main Idea 3 Since the beginning of the twentieth century, the trend in higher education has been one of expansion. This is true not only in Europe and America, but also all around the world. Statistics show that in 1900, only 2% of the population of Europe attended university; by 1939, this had reached 14%, and by 1991, the figure had risen to 29%. Similarly, in Africa, figures for the same years show a rise from 0.3% to 2.5% and finally to 9%. This clearly shows that more and more people are going on to university after school. Now, the British Prime Minister, Tony Blair, says that he wants 50% of all school students to go to university. This sounds like a fine plan, but what are the implications? Richard Woolmer, Trends, Full Press, Manchester, p.10

6 Text #1 – Summary Woolmer remarks there has been a sharp increase in university attendance all over the world in the last sixty years. He adds that in England now, the prime minister wants half of all school leavers to go on to university.

7 Text #2 The most exciting aspect of modern educational life is the expansion of university opportunities to all people in the general population. Some critics argue that too many young people now attend university. However, in the past, it was only children from rich families who could go. Now, not only the children of the wealthy but also the intelligent and hard-working have the chance to improve themselves and thus help society with what they learn in higher education. Gerald Whittaker, An Educated Life, Vanity Press, Leeds, p.121

8 Text #2 – Main Idea 1 The most exciting aspect of modern educational life is the expansion of university opportunities to all people in the general population. Some critics argue that too many young people now attend university. However, in the past, it was only children from rich families who could go. Now, not only the children of the wealthy but also the intelligent and hard-working have the chance to improve themselves and thus help society with what they learn in higher education. Gerald Whittaker, An Educated Life, Vanity Press, Leeds, p.121

9 Text #2 – Main Idea 2 The most exciting aspect of modern educational life is the expansion of university opportunities to all people in the general population. Some critics argue that too many young people now attend university. However, in the past, it was only children from rich families who could go. Now, not only the children of the wealthy but also the intelligent and hard-working have the chance to improve themselves and thus help society with what they learn in higher education. Gerald Whittaker, An Educated Life, Vanity Press, Leeds, p.121

10 Text #2 – Summary Whittaker sees this as a very positive goal and states that an increase in the educational opportunities of the general public offers people a way to make both themselves and the society they live in better.

11 Text #3 The Prime Minister's hopes for an expanded higher education sector will cause trouble. We must accept the fact that ‘more’ does not always mean ‘better’. The type of education given at university is simply not suitable for most people, so by sending half the population there, we are just going to produce a high number of poorly educated graduates. A second problem will be the question of where these graduates will find employment: just because more people have degrees does not mean that the number of jobs for those people will rise. The result: more unemployed graduates. I believe Mr. Blair should think again. Jane Willesden, Quality? Life Books, Newcastle, 2003 p.37

12 Text #3 – Main Idea 1 The Prime Minister's hopes for an expanded higher education sector will cause trouble. We must accept the fact that ‘more’ does not always mean ‘better’. The type of education given at university is simply not suitable for most people, so by sending half the population there, we are just going to produce a high number of poorly educated graduates. A second problem will be the question of where these graduates will find employment: just because more people have degrees does not mean that the number of jobs for those people will rise. The result: more unemployed graduates. I believe Mr. Blair should think again. Jane Willesden, Quality? Life Books, Newcastle, 2003 p.37

13 Text #3 – Main Idea 2 The Prime Minister's hopes for an expanded higher education sector will cause trouble. We must accept the fact that ‘more’ does not always mean ‘better’. The type of education given at university is simply not suitable for most people, so by sending half the population there, we are just going to produce a high number of poorly educated graduates. A second problem will be the question of where these graduates will find employment: just because more people have degrees does not mean that the number of jobs for those people will rise. The result: more unemployed graduates. I believe Mr. Blair should think again. Jane Willesden, Quality? Life Books, Newcastle, 2003 p.37

14 Text #3 – Main Idea 3 The Prime Minister's hopes for an expanded higher education sector will cause trouble. We must accept the fact that ‘more’ does not always mean ‘better’. The type of education given at university is simply not suitable for most people, so by sending half the population there, we are just going to produce a high number of poorly educated graduates. A second problem will be the question of where these graduates will find employment: just because more people have degrees does not mean that the number of jobs for those people will rise. The result: more unemployed graduates. I believe Mr. Blair should think again. Jane Willesden, Quality? Life Books, Newcastle, 2003 p.37

15 Text #3 – Summary Willesden points out that “education given at university is simply not suitable for most people”. She also highlights the possible problem of unemployment among graduates.

16 Synthesis The recent trend in higher education is one of expansion. As Woolmer (2003 p.10) remarks there has been a sharp increase in university attendance all over the world in the last sixty years. He adds that in England now, the prime minister wants half of all school leavers to go on to university. Whittaker (1998 p.121) sees this as a very positive goal and states that an increase in the educational opportunities of the general public offers people a way to make both themselves and the society they live in better. However, not everyone is of the same mind. With the increase in the number of university entrants, there is a chance that educational standards will drop. As pointed out by Willesden (2003 p.37) “education given at university is simply not suitable for most people”. She also highlights the possible problem of unemployment among graduates.

17 References 1)Woolmer R, (2003). Trends. Full Press, Manchester. 2)Whittaker G, (1998). An Educated Life. Vanity Press, Leeds. 3)Willesden J, (2003). Quality? Life Books, Newcastle.


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