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A few lesson ideas. A Macronutrient We eat it in (relatively) large amounts Provides energy (that means Calories) Contains nitrogen Important tissue.

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Presentation on theme: "A few lesson ideas. A Macronutrient We eat it in (relatively) large amounts Provides energy (that means Calories) Contains nitrogen Important tissue."— Presentation transcript:

1 A few lesson ideas

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4 A Macronutrient We eat it in (relatively) large amounts Provides energy (that means Calories) Contains nitrogen Important tissue in the body Molecules (with nitrogen) that have important functions in the body

5 MUSCLES Forms the basis of bones and teeth Enzymes that make reactions happen Antibodies and Immune System Carriers

6 Give structure to some foods Provides calories Gives a feeling of satiety, so that eating can stop Tends to even out blood sugar

7 Starts as strings of amino acids 20 different ones are used 9 need to be provided by the diet Strings are twisted, folded, held together so that protein has a shape Shapes determine what the protein is able to do

8 Meats, fish, poultry 7 grams / ounce Dairy Products 8 grams / cup milk Eggs 7 grams / egg Legumes 15 grams / cup Grains 3 grams / ounce Seeds, nuts, and most vegetables also have some

9 We need to get 9 of the 20 amino acids from our food Animal proteins have all of them So does soy Other sources are low in one or two Digestibility also counts That’s how easily the body can get to those amino acids Fiber and other plant substances in non- animal foods decrease digestibility

10 Other Nutrients (varies, too) Saturated Fat Cholesterol Total Fat (Unless fat-free, it’s all there) B vitamins (Not B12, but Folate) Fiber—both Soluble and insoluble

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12 But, that assumes Calories are adequate And person is healthy And normal weight and height Another way to figure is to multiply weight in kilograms by 0.8 gm protein Or multiply weight in pounds by 0.4 gm protein

13 A day’s food intake including 4-7 ounces of meat, fish or substitute and 2 cups of milk g protein from meat, 16 g from milk, plus more from grains

14 Daily Values aren’t given for foods unless they are meant for kids under 4.

15 I’ve decided to eat vegetarian.’

16 Amount of protein and amounts of the amino acids are important Most plant sources are low in one of two of the needed amino acids But they can complement each other Complimentary Proteins

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18 Veggie Chili (1 cup) 180 calories 19 gm protein 2.0 fat 0 mg cholesterol 17 g fiber Scrambled tofu 65 calories 7 gm protein 2.5 g fat 0 sat. fat 0 mg cholesterol

19 Black bean burger on a bun 230 calories 16 gm protein 5.5 g fat.5 g sat fat 5 g fiber 1 oz. Raw almonds (23) and ½ oz. raisins (30) 204 calories 6 gm protein 14 gm fat 1 gm sat fat 4 gm fiber

20 Soft- salad dressings & desserts Firm – general purposes Extra firm – stir fries, salads

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22 Tempeh is a made from cooked and fermented soybeans and formed into a patty Unlike soy it is quite firm Grains may be added Tempeh has a nutty flavor Several varieties available Takes the place of meat in many dishes Found in the refrigerator section

23 Not recommended for those with soy allergies or those with thyroid issues. Excellent source of protein, calcium and iron It’s a complete protein Gluten-free High in tryptophan Great for weight loss

24 2 gm protein per T High in Fiber Anti-inflammatory Helps decrease bad cholesterol Preventive against breast, colon and prostate cancer Helps relieve constipation May be preventative against heart disease and diabetes

25 For 1 egg 1 TBS flaxseed meal 3 Tablespoons water Combine the flaxseed and water and let sit for 5 minutes. Double or Triple recipe as needed.

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27 Enjoy a few samples of high protein, meatless foods you could use in your foods lab! Thank You!!


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