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The Breakdown of Perspectival Space (and the rise of Self-Reflexivity in Modern Art)

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Presentation on theme: "The Breakdown of Perspectival Space (and the rise of Self-Reflexivity in Modern Art)"— Presentation transcript:

1 The Breakdown of Perspectival Space (and the rise of Self-Reflexivity in Modern Art)

2 Surface Depth Surface MedievalRenaissanceModernism

3 Early Renaissance

4 The Annunciation, Fra Carnevale (1448)

5 Early Renaissance Flagellation of Christ, Piero Della Francesca (1450)

6

7 The Ideal City

8 Early Renaissance Madonna of Chancellor Rolin, Jan Van Eyck (1435) People slowly become more Naturally depicted in that space.

9 More Naturally depicted.

10 Early Renaissance The Arnolfini Portrait, Jan Van Eyck (1434)

11 Early Renaissance The Arnolfini Portrait, Jan Van Eyck (1434)

12 Renaissance

13 Bodies eventually get fleshed out.

14 Renaissance Vanitas/ Still-Life, Pieter Claeszoon (1630) High level of articulated detail.

15 Renaissance Vanitas/ Still-Life, Pieter Claeszoon (1630) High level of articulated detail.

16 Renaissance Vanitas/ Still-Life, Pieter Claeszoon (1630) High level of articulated detail.

17 Surface Depth Surface MedievalRenaissanceModernism

18 RenaissanceModernism Rococo

19 RenaissanceModernism Symbolism

20 RenaissanceModernism Romanticism

21 Early Modernism

22 Oath of the Horatii, Jacques-Louis David (1784) Two Planes Theatrically Staged

23 Early Modernism Death of Marat, Jacques-Louis David (1784) Foreground No background

24 Early Modernism Raft of the Medusa, Théodore Géricault, (1818–1819) Pile of People Blobby forms

25 Early Modernism Orphan Girl at the Cemetery, Delacroix (1824)

26 Early Modernism Hyperrealism Large Eyes Color

27 Early Modernism Massacre at Chios, Eugène Delacroix (1824)

28 Early Modernism Oath of the Horatii, Delacroix (1824) Too Real, Harsh Attack on Art Massacre at Chios, Eugène Delacroix (1824) Early Modernism

29 The Fighting Téméraire tugged to her last Berth to be broken J. M. W. Turner (1838) Surface Emphasis Pre-Impressionism

30 Early Modernism The Fighting Téméraire tugged to her last Berth to be broken J. M. W. Turner (1838) Surface Emphasis Pre-Impressionism

31 Modernism

32 The Luncheon on the Grass, Édouard Manet (1863)

33 Modernism The Luncheon on the Grass, Édouard Manet (1863) Nude & dressed men (in contemporary setting)Nude & dressed men (in contemporary setting) Combination of GenresCombination of Genres –still life, landscape, nude, portraiture Background figure too largeBackground figure too large Nude is washed outNude is washed out Modernism

34 The Luncheon on the Grass, Édouard Manet (1863) In 1863 Painting with a capital P was born. It was now a Medium. Modernism

35 Never prior to Manet had the breach between the taste of the public and changing types of beautywhich art continually renewsbeen so conclusively final. With Manet began the days of wrath, of those outbursts of scorn and derision with which, ever since, the public has greeted each successive rejuvenation of beauty. George Bataille

36 Olympia, Édouard Manet (1863) Modernism

37 Reference Venus de Urbino Contemporary prostitute slippers Washed out skin Look matter of factly at viewer Cold, strong, young, prostitute Olympia, Édouard Manet (1863)

38 Modernism Olympia, Édouard Manet (1863)

39 Modernism The laughter that lay in wait for Olympia was something unprecedented; here was the first masterpiece before which the crowd fairly lost all control of itself. George Bataille Olympia, Édouard Manet (1863)

40 Modernism Jean Ravenel, art critic, What on earth is this yellow-bellied odalisque, this wretched model picked up God knows where and pawned off as representing Olympia? Olympia, Édouard Manet (1863)

41 Modernism Paul de Saint-Victor, art critic, The crowd gathers round Monsieur Manet's highly spiced Olympia as it would round a body at the morgue. Olympia, Édouard Manet (1863)

42 Modernism Painters, and especially Édouard Manet, who is an analytic painter, do not share the masses' obsession with the subject: to them, the subject is only a pretext to paint, whereas for the masses only the subject exists. Emile Zola, 1867 Olympia, Édouard Manet (1863)

43 Modernism Her real nudity (not merely that of her body) is the silence that emanates from her, like that from a sunken ship. All we have is the sacred horror of her presence. Olympia, Édouard Manet (1863)

44 Modernism Her real nudity (not merely that of her body) is the silence that emanates from her, like that from a sunken ship. All we have is the sacred horror of her presencepresence whose sheer simplicity is tantamount to absence. Her harsh realismwhich, for the Salon public, was no more than a gorilla-like uglinessis inseparable from the concern Manet had to reduce what he saw to the mute and utter simplicity of what was there. Olympia, Édouard Manet (1863)

45 Modernism Viewer is propositioning barmaid Bored, resigned expression Snap-shot-like composition (feet in corner) Impossible mirror image A Bar at the Folies-Bergère, Édouard Manet (1881-2)

46 Modernism Manet, from the very start, had put the image of man on the same footing as that of roses or buns. George Bataille

47 Arcadia (a videogame that combines genres) Created by Gamelab at MIT


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