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Delivering a Shopper-Centric Beer Retail Environment: Shopper Decision Tree Anheuser-Busch Marketing Planning & Research National Retail Sales Jan 2005.

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Presentation on theme: "Delivering a Shopper-Centric Beer Retail Environment: Shopper Decision Tree Anheuser-Busch Marketing Planning & Research National Retail Sales Jan 2005."— Presentation transcript:

1 Delivering a Shopper-Centric Beer Retail Environment: Shopper Decision Tree Anheuser-Busch Marketing Planning & Research National Retail Sales Jan 2005

2 Background What is a Decision Tree? Why Have One?

3 Decision Tree: Background and Methodology What is a Consumer Decision Tree? A CDT is a hierarchical marketing model used to understand consumer choices made at the point of sale. CDTs illustrate the considerations consumers use to focus on their choices from a total category assortment. Why do a decision tree? CDTs allow the ability to visually portray product relationships based on real consumer perceptions. CDTs allow manufacturers to provide retail accounts with suggested actionable solutions based on how consumers think about and shop their category. How do manufacturers and retailers use CDTs? Some of the preferred implementations of CDTs include: Strategic promotional choices Shelf space allocation Optimizations of product assortments Development of new planograms Product acceptance/deletion criteria Other in-store ventures such as promotion and merchandising decisions, marketing communications, new product introductions

4 The Decision Tree Shoppers Decision Process Structure of Decision Tree Differences Between Each Branch

5 OCCASION…Defines Amount and Scope of Product(s) Needed / Desired Category(ies) Brand(s) / Price Segment(s) Class Of Trade / Shopping Experience Sales/Deals (Within Evoked Set of Occasion-Appropriate Items) Package Size & Container Order may switch depending on occasion Alcohol Beverage Shopper Decision Process (General Sequence of Shoppers Conscious Decisions) Order may switch depending on occasion Source: A-B In-Store Decision Tree Study, 2005

6 Alcohol Beverage Shopper Decision Process Examples SequenceExample 1Example 2 Occasion…Defines Amount and Scope of Product(s) Needed / Desired Personal refreshment only; one occasion; limited means Casual home party with contemporary adult friends; one occasion Category(ies)BeerLiquor and Beer Brand(s) / Price Segment(s) (not necessarily in that order) Busch Light; Value Segment Good beer variety and need to pick up other stuff for party Grocery Chain X near friends house Class of Trade / Shopping Experience C-store; just need beer; easy in & out Tequila (Jose Cuervo), Vodka (Smirnoff), Premium Light (Bud Light) and Micro (Fat Tire) Store C-Store Chain X, on my way home Sales / DealsLarge single, can Maybe, if any other occasion-appropriate brands are on sale Package size & container Would willingly switch brands for a better deal 750 ml of Liquor; Multi-pk bottles of beer (pack sizes depend on # of people) Source: A-B In-Store Decision Tree Study, 2005

7 SequenceExample 1Example 2 Occasion…Defines Amount and Scope of Product(s) Needed / Desired Personal refreshment only; one occasion; limited means Casual home party with contemporary adult friends; one occasion Category(ies)BeerLiquor and Beer Brand(s) / Price Segment(s) Busch Light; Value Segment Good beer variety and need to pick up other stuff for party Grocery Chain X near friends house Class of Trade / Shopping Experience C-store; just need beer; easy in & out Tequila (Jose Cuervo), Vodka (Smirnoff), Premium Light (Bud Light) and Micro (Fat Tire) Store C-Store Chain X, on my way home Sales / DealsLarge single, can Maybe, if any other occasion-appropriate brands are on sale Package size & container Would willingly switch brands for a better deal 750 ml of Liquor; Multi-pk bottles of beer (pack sizes depend on # of people) Alcohol Beverage Shopper Decision Process (General Sequence of Shoppers Conscious Decisions) THE DECISION TREE, DESCRIBED ON THE FOLLOWING SLIDES, REPRESENTS HOW THESE SEGMENT / BRAND DECISIONS ARE MADE

8 Shopper Decision Tree - Segments and Brands (Whats In Each Segment) B E E R Wine Hard Liquor Amstel Light Aspen Edge Michelob Ultra etc. Premium/ Above Premium SABMiller Lite Bud Light Coors Light etc. Budweiser Coors Ice House MGD etc. Bacardi Silver Mikes Hard Lemon Smirnoff Ice Tequiza Zima etc. Red Hook Sam Adams Shiner Bock Sierra Nevada Fat Tire Local Micro etc. FAB Super-Light Mich Family Rolling Rock etc. Premium Regular Premium Regular Mexican European Australian Canadian Traditional Beer Domestic Specialty Domestic Specialty Imports Colt 45 King Cobra Mickeys etc. Value Light Regular High Alcoho l Natural Ice Bud Ice Other Ice etc. Busch Light Keystone Light etc. Busch Keystone Miller High Life Mil Best/ Old Mil PBR Schlitz etc. Malt Tilt Sparks Natty Up etc. Energy / High Alcohol Traditional Value Premium Light Craft/ Micro Craft/ Micro Source: A-B In-Store Decision Tree Study, 2005

9 Shopper Decision Tree - Demographic Skews (Whos Buying Each Segment) B E E R Wine Hard Liquor Premium/ Above Premium Same as Total Beer Younger (21-27) Female Male Anglo Higher Income FAB Super-Light Anglo Higher Income Premium Regular Premium Regular Traditional Beer Domestic Specialty Domestic Specialty Imports Male African - American Lower Income Value Light Regular High Alcoho l Younger (21-27) Lower Income Male Older Anglo Older Male Lower Income Malt Younger (21-27) Energy / High Alcohol Traditional Value Premium Light Craft/ Micro Craft/ Micro Mexican: Younger (21- 27), Latino, Higher Income European, Australian, & Canadian: Male, Higher Income Female, Older Higher Income Older and Younger (21-27) All Adults 21+ $51K Avg. Income 62% Male / 38% Female 66% Anglo, 11% Black, 23% Latino Female, Older Higher Income Source: A-B In-Store Decision Tree Study, 2005

10 Shopper Decision Tree - Purchase Motivations (What Shoppers Desire When They Buy Each Segment) B E E R Wine Hard Liquor Very Light Taste Very Low Calorie Non-Beer-y Low Carb Premium/ Above Premium Light Taste Fewer Calories Brand Loyalty Full Taste Traditional Alcohol Content For Particular Occasion More Impulse Unique Style & Flavor Low Concern for Calories Style Not Mass Produced Something Different No Calorie or Carb Concern FAB Super-Light Want Recognized Brand Name but Less Brand Loyal Domestic but Special / Different Little Calorie Concern Premium Regular Premium Regular Traditional Beer Domestic Specialty Domestic Specialty Imports Brand Loyalty Higher Alc Content Smaller Pack Size Value Light Regular High Alcoho l Faster paced consumption experience Brand Loyalty Dont seek new or different Household Replenishment Brand Loyalty Household Replenishment Malt Energy / High Alcohol Traditional Value Premium Light Craft/ Micro Craft/ Micro Mexican: Brand Loyalty, Bottles, Lighter Style, Imported European, Australian, & Canadian: Style, Imported, Less Brand Loyal Faster paced consumption experience Aspirational Intimate Socializing Sophistication Fashion & Style Take Things Up A Notch New flavors, recipes Most Popular Alcohol Beverage Unpretentious Casual Source: A-B In-Store Decision Tree Study, 2005

11 Shopper Decision Tree - Channel Skews (Where Segments Shoppers Skew) B E E R Wine Hard Liquor Grocery and Clubs Premium/ Above Premium All Channels C-Stores Grocery Clubs FAB Super-Light Grocery Premium Regular Premium Regular Traditional Beer Domestic Specialty Domestic Specialty Imports C-Stores Value Light Regular High Alcoho l C-Stores Grocery Mass Merch C-Stores Malt TBD Energy / High Alcohol Traditional Value Premium Light Craft/ Micro Craft/ Micro Mexican: Grocery European, Australian, & Canadian: Grocery Grocery, Clubs, Wine Stores Grocery, Liquor Stores Source: A-B In-Store Decision Tree Study, 2005

12 Shopper Decision Tree - Importance of Price/Deal B E E R Wine Hard Liquor Premium/ Above Premium FAB Super-Light Premium Regular Premium Regular Traditional Beer Domestic Specialty Domestic Specialty Imports Value Light Regular High Alcoho l Malt Energy / High Alcohol Traditional Value Premium Light Craft/ Micro Craft/ Micro Price Importance Index: n/a Price Importance Index: 69 Price Importance Index: 202 Price Importance Index: 163 Price Importance Index: 135 Price Importance Index: n/a Price Importance Index: 60 Price Importance Index: Mexican: 73 Euro/Aus/Can 74 Price Importance Index: 69 Price Importance Index: 87 Price Importance Index: 104 Price Importance Index: 65 The Price Importance Index represents the relative importance of price/deal to each segments buyers. It was calculated by averaging the importance ratings of on sale and less expensive than other beers among each segments buyers and indexing these versus the average importance of these attributes among the total sample. Color Key: Low Average High Source: A-B In-Store Decision Tree Study, 2005

13 Decision Tree Applications Feature Ad Strategy Implications Assortment Strategy Implications Space and Flow Implications

14 Price Sensitivity MALT LIQUOR VALUE LIGHT VALUE REGULAR PREMIUM LIGHT Loyalty To Segment PREMIUM REGULAR SUPER LIGHT IMPORTS DOMESTIC SPECIALTY FABs MICROS High Segment Loyalty High Price Sensitivity Feature often to: Grow/maintain shopper loyalty Create/maintain status as beer destination Carry wide assortment High Segment Loyalty Low Price Sensitivity Dont need to feature as often Carry wider assortment for higher share segments Carry narrower assortment for lower share segments Low Segment Loyalty Low Price Sensitivity Feature occasionally to: Generate incremental volume Promote trade-up Create variety perception Low Segment Loyalty High Price Sensitivity EDLP Narrow Assortment 12%+ $ share6-10% $ share 2-5% $ share<2% $ share Assortment and Feature Strategy Guide

15 Shopper Decision Tree Implications Feature Ad Strategies To drive traffic and increase or maintain shopper loyalty, feature activity should focus on higher share, more loyal, and more price sensitive branches of the decision tree.* In most channels, Premium Lights and Value brands should receive the most regular feature ad activity. Rotate promotions of brands within branches of tree, according to their relative fair share, to appeal to particular brand buyers within each branch. To drive incremental volume and encourage trade-up, feature lower share, less loyal and less price sensitive branches less frequently. In most channels, Imports, Micros, Domestic Specialties, and FABs should receive proportionally less feature activity. Use these segments tactically, considering your accounts beer category strategy and shopper base. * see appendix for shares by branch

16 Consider a Super Lights section... If chain or cluster of stores is frequented by female, older, higher income shoppers. At Club stores (where this segment skews highest due to female/high income shopper base). Consider a separate Energy/High Alcohol section… At C-Stores (where this segment is likely to skew high due to male shoppers), or if chain or cluster of stores is frequented by males. If these new products are introduced and gain momentum at your chain. Use appropriate signage or section marker to draw attention to it. When new items are introduced, items in lowest share branches of tree should be scrutinized for de-listing to create space for new item(s). CDT should be used only as a starting point in these decisions. Work with RSM group to make fact-based add / retain / delete decisions. Shopper Decision Tree Implications Assortment / Distribution Opportunities

17 Shopper Decision Tree Implications Space and Merchandising Flow Strategies Dont rely exclusively on CDT for shelf set / flow decisions. Use your knowledge of the category and your customers business to make the right fact-based recommendations. Enlist the help of your Category Manager, Category Space Managers, and Shopper Insights teams to help make decisions. In general, place highest share branches of the decision tree near the center of the section. Draw shoppers into section and expose them to maximum real estate in the aisle. Size of tree branches in terms of share should be considered in determining relative number of facings for each branch. Consider using permanent signage or fixtures to designate sections according to major branches of the CDT.

18 APPENDIX DECISION TREES BY CHANNEL Grocery Convenience Mass Merch Club Drug SHARES BY CHANNEL Case Volume Shares Dollar Shares SEGMENT SWITCHING Share of Requirements by Segment Second Choice Segments BACKGROUND AND METHODOLOGY

19 Decision Trees by Channel Grocery C-Stores Mass Merch Clubs Drug Stores

20 Beer Shopper Decision Tree: Grocery = dominant path(s) = secondary path(s) Source: A-B In-Store Decision Tree Study, 2005 Based on Shoppers, not Volume! B E E R 100% B E E R 100% FAB 3% FAB 3% Super-Light 6% Super-Light 6% Premium Regular 14% Premium Regular 14% Traditional Beer 94% Domestic Specialty 5% Domestic Specialty 5% Imports 16% Imports 16% Light 6% Light 6% Regular 9% Regular 9% High Alcoho l <1% High Alcoho l <1% Malt 1% Malt 1% Energy / High Alcohol <1% Traditional Value 16% Premium Light 32% Premium Light 32% Craft/ Micro 7% Craft/ Micro 7% Premium/ Above Premium 77% Value 17%

21 Beer Shopper Decision Tree: C-Stores = dominant path(s) = secondary path(s) Source: A-B In-Store Decision Tree Study, 2005 Based on Shoppers, not Volume! B E E R 100% B E E R 100% FAB 4% FAB 4% Super-Light 2% Super-Light 2% Premium Regular 27% Premium Regular 27% Traditional Beer 98% Domestic Specialty 2% Domestic Specialty 2% Light 3% Light 3% Regular 13% Regular 13% High Alcoho l 2% High Alcoho l 2% Malt 12% Malt 12% Energy / High Alcohol <1% Traditional Value 16% Premium Light 25% Premium Light 25% Craft/ Micro <1% Craft/ Micro <1% Premium/ Above Premium 69% Value 29% Imports 12%

22 Beer Shopper Decision Tree: Mass Merch = dominant path(s) = secondary path(s) Source: A-B In-Store Decision Tree Study, 2005 Based on Shoppers, not Volume! B E E R 100% B E E R 100% FAB 4% FAB 4% Super-Light 6% Super-Light 6% Premium Regular 14% Premium Regular 14% Traditional Beer 94% Domestic Specialty 3% Domestic Specialty 3% Imports 12% Imports 12% Light 13% Light 13% Regular 11% Regular 11% High Alcoho l <1% High Alcoho l <1% Malt <1% Malt <1% Energy / High Alcohol <1% Traditional Value 24% Premium Light 35% Premium Light 35% Craft/ Micro 2% Craft/ Micro 2% Premium/ Above Premium 70% Value 24%

23 Beer Shopper Decision Tree: Club Stores = dominant path(s) = secondary path(s) Source: A-B In-Store Decision Tree Study, 2005 Based on Shoppers, not Volume! B E E R 100% B E E R 100% FAB 1% FAB 1% Super-Light 11% Super-Light 11% Premium Regular 17% Premium Regular 17% Traditional Beer 89% Domestic Specialty 1% Domestic Specialty 1% Imports 15% Imports 15% Light 4% Light 4% Regular <1% Regular <1% High Alcoho l 1% High Alcoho l 1% Malt <1% Malt <1% Energy / High Alcohol <1% Traditional Value 4% Premium Light 46% Premium Light 46% Craft/ Micro 4% Craft/ Micro 4% Premium/ Above Premium 84% Value 5% Note: Skews higher in Clubs than in any other channel (due to high in come female shopper base)

24 Beer Shopper Decision Tree: Drug Stores = dominant path(s) = secondary path(s) Source: A-B In-Store Decision Tree Study, 2005 Based on Shoppers, not Volume! B E E R 100% B E E R 100% FAB 2% FAB 2% Super-Light 2% Super-Light 2% Premium Regular 25% Premium Regular 25% Traditional Beer 98% Domestic Specialty 2% Domestic Specialty 2% Imports 15% Imports 15% Light 8% Light 8% Regular 18% Regular 18% High Alcoho l 2% High Alcoho l 2% Malt <1% Malt <1% Energy / High Alcohol <1% Traditional Value 26% Premium Light 25% Premium Light 25% Craft/ Micro <1% Craft/ Micro <1% Premium/ Above Premium 69% Value 29%

25 Shares by Channel Case and Dollar Shares Grocery C-Stores Drug Stores

26 Case Shares: Grocery Source: InfoScan 12 mos ending 10/05 To drive incremental volume and profit, feature lower share branches, but less frequently. Micros, Domestic Specialties, FABs, Value brands, and Super Lights should receive proportionally less feature activity than Premiums and Imports. Use these segments tactically, considering your accounts beer category strategy and shopper base. B E E R 100% B E E R 100% FAB 2% FAB 2% Super-Light 4% Super-Light 4% Premium Regular 14% Premium Regular 14% Traditional Beer 95% Domestic Specialty 4% Domestic Specialty 4% Imports 13% Imports 13% Light 12% Light 12% Regular 10% Regular 10% High Alcoho l 3% High Alcoho l 3% Malt 1% Malt 1% Energy / High Alcohol <1% Traditional Value 22% Premium Light 33% Premium Light 33% Craft/ Micro 3% Craft/ Micro 3% Premium/ Above Premium 69% Value 26% To drive traffic and maintain shopper loyalty, feature activity should focus on higher share branches of the decision tree. So Premium Lights, Premium Regulars, and Imports should receive the majority of Grocery feature ad activity. To drive traffic and maintain loyalty, rotate promotions of brands within branches according to fair share; but only need to feature one at a time per branch.

27 Dollar Shares: Grocery Source: InfoScan 12 mos ending 10/05 To drive incremental volume and profit, feature lower share branches, but less frequently. Micros, Domestic Specialties, FABs, Value brands, and Super Lights should receive proportionally less feature activity than Premiums and Imports. Use these segments tactically, considering your accounts beer category strategy and shopper base. B E E R 100% B E E R 100% FAB 4% FAB 4% Super-Light 5% Super-Light 5% Premium Regular 13% Premium Regular 13% Traditional Beer 94% Domestic Specialty 4% Domestic Specialty 4% Imports 19% Imports 19% Light 8% Light 8% Regular 7% Regular 7% High Alcoho l 2% High Alcoho l 2% Malt 1% Malt 1% Energy / High Alcohol 1% Traditional Value 15% Premium Light 31% Premium Light 31% Craft/ Micro 5% Craft/ Micro 5% Premium/ Above Premium 76% Value 18% To drive traffic and maintain shopper loyalty, feature activity should focus on higher share branches of the decision tree. So Premium Lights, Premium Regulars, and Imports should receive the majority of Grocery feature ad activity. To drive traffic and maintain loyalty, rotate promotions of brands within branches according to fair share; but only need to feature one at a time per branch.

28 Case Shares: C-Stores Source: InfoScan 12 mos ending 10/05 B E E R 100% B E E R 100% FAB 2% FAB 2% Super-Light 2% Super-Light 2% Premium Regular 18% Premium Regular 18% Traditional Beer 97% Domestic Specialty 2% Domestic Specialty 2% Imports 7% Imports 7% Light 13% Light 13% Regular 11% Regular 11% High Alcoho l 4% High Alcoho l 4% Malt 4% Malt 4% Energy / High Alcohol <1% Traditional Value 24% Premium Light 36% Premium Light 36% Craft/ Micro 1% Craft/ Micro 1% Premium/ Above Premium 65% Value 32% To drive incremental volume and profit, feature lower share branches, but less frequently. Micros, Imports, Domestic Specialties, FABs, and Super Lights should receive proportionally less C-Store promotional activity than Premiums. Use these segments tactically, considering your accounts beer category strategy and shopper base. To drive traffic and maintain shopper loyalty, promotional activity should focus on higher share branches of the decision tree. So Premium Lights, Premium Regulars, and traditional Value brands should receive the majority of C-Store promotional activity. To drive traffic and maintain loyalty, rotate promotions of brands within branches according to fair share; but only need to feature one at a time per branch.

29 Dollar Shares: C-Stores Source: InfoScan 12 mos ending 10/05 B E E R 100% B E E R 100% FAB 3% FAB 3% Super-Light 3% Super-Light 3% Premium Regular 18% Premium Regular 18% Traditional Beer 97% Domestic Specialty 1% Domestic Specialty 1% Imports 10% Imports 10% Light 10% Light 10% Regular 8% Regular 8% High Alcoho l 3% High Alcoho l 3% Malt 3% Malt 3% Energy / High Alcohol <1% Traditional Value 18% Premium Light 38% Premium Light 38% Craft/ Micro 1% Craft/ Micro 1% Premium/ Above Premium 73% Value 24% To drive incremental volume and profit, feature lower share branches, but less frequently. Micros, Imports, Domestic Specialties, FABs, and Super Lights should receive proportionally less C-Store promotional activity than Premiums. Use these segments tactically, considering your accounts beer category strategy and shopper base. To drive traffic and maintain shopper loyalty, promotional activity should focus on higher share branches of the decision tree. So Premium Lights, Premium Regulars, and traditional Value brands should receive the majority of C-Store promotional activity. To drive traffic and maintain loyalty, rotate promotions of brands within branches according to fair share; but only need to feature one at a time per branch.

30 Case Shares: Drug Source: InfoScan 12 mos ending 10/05 To drive incremental volume and profit, feature lower share branches, but less frequently. Imports, Super Lights, Domestic Specialties, FABs, Value brands, and Value Regulars should receive proportionally less feature activity than Premium Regulars and Value Lights. Use these segments tactically, considering your accounts beer category strategy and shopper base. B E E R 100% B E E R 100% FAB 1% FAB 1% Super-Light 3% Super-Light 3% Premium Regular 16% Premium Regular 16% Traditional Beer 97% Domestic Specialty 2% Domestic Specialty 2% Imports 15% Imports 15% Light 15% Light 15% Regular 12% Regular 12% High Alcoho l 4% High Alcoho l 4% Malt 1% Malt 1% Energy / High Alcohol <1% Traditional Value 27% Premium Light 31% Premium Light 31% Craft/ Micro 1% Craft/ Micro 1% Premium/ Above Premium 65% Value 32% To drive traffic and maintain shopper loyalty, feature activity should focus on higher share branches of the decision tree. So Premium Lights, Premium Regulars, and Value Lights should receive the majority of feature ad activity in most Drug stores. To drive traffic and maintain loyalty, rotate promotions of brands within branches according to fair share; but only need to feature one at a time per branch.

31 Dollar Shares: Drug Source: InfoScan 12 mos ending 10/05 B E E R 100% B E E R 100% FAB 2% FAB 2% Super-Light 3% Super-Light 3% Premium Regular 16% Premium Regular 16% Traditional Beer 97% Domestic Specialty 3% Domestic Specialty 3% Imports 19% Imports 19% Light 10% Light 10% Regular 9% Regular 9% High Alcoho l 3% High Alcoho l 3% Malt 1% Malt 1% Energy / High Alcohol <1% Traditional Value 19% Premium Light 31% Premium Light 31% Craft/ Micro 2% Craft/ Micro 2% Premium/ Above Premium 74% Value 23% To drive incremental volume and profit, feature lower share branches, but less frequently. Imports, Super Lights, Domestic Specialties, FABs, Value brands, and Value Regulars should receive proportionally less feature activity than Premiums and Value Lights. Use these segments tactically, considering your accounts beer category strategy and shopper base. To drive traffic and maintain shopper loyalty, feature activity should focus on higher share branches of the decision tree. So Premium Lights, Premium Regulars, and Value Lights should receive the majority of feature ad activity in most Drug stores. To drive traffic and maintain loyalty, rotate promotions of brands within branches according to fair share; but only need to feature one at a time per branch.

32 Loyalty and Switching Share of Requirements by Segment Second Choice Segments

33 Wine Hard Liquor Share of Requirements and Second Choices Among Most Often Buyers of Segment How to read: Few buyers are 100% loyal to any one segment, but they do have most often preferences. For example, those who say their most often brand is a Premium Light brand, on average, give 83% of their beer volume to Premium Lights. When they are not buying Premium Lights, they are next most likely to buy either Premium Regulars or Imports. Source: A-B Shopper Poll, 2005 B E E R FAB 70% FAB 70% Super-Light 68% Super-Light 68% Premium Regular 71% Premium Regular 71% Traditional Beer Domestic Specialty 69% Domestic Specialty 69% Imports 70% Imports 70% Light 80% Light 80% Regular 69% Regular 69% High Alcoho l 65% High Alcoho l 65% Malt 51% Malt 51% Energy / High Alcohol na Energy / High Alcohol na Traditional Value Premium Light 83% Premium Light 83% Craft/ Micro 68% Craft/ Micro 68% Premium/ Above Premium Value Premium Lights Imports Premium Lights Micros Premium Regulars Premium Lights Premium Regular Imports

34 Wine 23% Wine 23% Hard Liquor 25% Hard Liquor 25% Share of Requirements and Second Choices Among Avg. Past Week Buyers of Segment How to read: A typical past week buyer of Craft/Micro beer gives 48% of his beer volume to Craft/Micros. He is most likely to also have Premium Lights in his purchase mix. Source: A-B Shopper Poll, 2005 B E E R 52% B E E R 52% FAB 54% FAB 54% Super-Light 63% Super-Light 63% Premium Regular 63% Premium Regular 63% Traditional Beer Domestic Specialty 52% Domestic Specialty 52% Imports 53% Imports 53% Light 65% Light 65% Regular 59% Regular 59% High Alcoho l 59% High Alcoho l 59% Malt 48% Malt 48% Energy / High Alcohol na Energy / High Alcohol na Traditional Value Premium Light 74% Premium Light 74% Craft/ Micro 48% Craft/ Micro 48% Premium/ Above Premium Value Premium Lights Premium Regulars Premium Lights Premium Regular Imports

35 Decision Tree Methodology

36 Comparison of Common CDT Methodologies A-B uses in-store intercepts where legal to construct the beer shopper decision tree because they reveal more accurate decision factors at the point of purchase.

37 Anheuser-Busch CDT Methodology Sample Composition ~2,000 in-store interviews with beer shoppers Grocery, C-Store, Mass Merch, Club, and Drug channels represented Survey collected attitudinal, behavioral, transactional, and demographic information Time Frame and Geography Interviews took place from Fall of 2004 – Summer of 2005 Geographic dispersion throughout major US markets (FL, AZ, OH, IL, TX, IN, MI, CA) Source: A-B In-Store Decision Tree Study, 2005


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