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SIGNAL CORPS PRAYER ALMIGHTY GOD WHO ART THE AUTHOR OF LIBERTY AND CHAMPION OF THE OPPRESSED HEAR OUR PRAYERS WE THE MEN OF THE SIGNAL CORPS ACKNOWLEDGE.

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Presentation on theme: "SIGNAL CORPS PRAYER ALMIGHTY GOD WHO ART THE AUTHOR OF LIBERTY AND CHAMPION OF THE OPPRESSED HEAR OUR PRAYERS WE THE MEN OF THE SIGNAL CORPS ACKNOWLEDGE."— Presentation transcript:

1 SIGNAL CORPS PRAYER ALMIGHTY GOD WHO ART THE AUTHOR OF LIBERTY AND CHAMPION OF THE OPPRESSED HEAR OUR PRAYERS WE THE MEN OF THE SIGNAL CORPS ACKNOWLEDGE OUR DEPENDENCE UPON THEE IN THE PRESERVATION OF HUMAN FREEDOM. GO WITH US AS WE SEEK TO DEFEND THE DEFENSELESS AND TO FREE THE ENSLAVED MAY WE EVER REMEMBER OUR NATION WHOSE MOTTO IS IN GOD WE TRUST - EXPECTS THAT WE SHALL ACQUIT OURSELVES WITH HONOR THAT WE MAY NEVER BRING SHAME UPON OUR FAITH OUR FAMILIES OUR FELLOW MAN GRANT US WISDOM FROM THY MIND, COURAGE FROM THINE HEART STRENGTH FROM THINE ARM AND PROTECTION BY THINE HAND IT IS FOR THEE THAT WE DO BATTLE AND TO THE BELONGS THE VICOTRS CROWN FOR THINE IS THE KINGDOM AND THE POWER AND GLORY FOREVER AMEN 3 DECEMBER 1999 FORT GORDON, GEORGIA 93rd Signal Brigade DINING OUT

2 1800 COCKTAILS 1845CALL TO MESS 1900POST COLORS 1905INVOCATION 1910WELCOME AND TOASTS / HONORS TO FALLEN COMRADES 1920GROG BOWL CEREMONY 1940DINNER & HOLIDAY CAROLS CAROLING COMPANY CDRS DIAMONDS IN THE ROUGH 2100INTERMISSION 2115RECALL TO MESS 2120ENTERTAINMENT SKITS (56th, 63rd, 67th & HHC, 93rd) 2145INTRODUCTION OF GUEST SPEAKER 2200GIFT TO GUEST SPEAKER 2210CLOSING OF THE MESS 2215BENEDICTION 2220RETIRE THE COLORS 2230INFORMAL SOCIAL PROGRAM OF EVENTS Rules and Protocol of the Mess Each member of the mess should arrive no later than 1800 to have ample time to go through the receiving line and to socialize before dinner is served. When the signal is given, the members of the mess should enter the dinning room, stand behind their chairs and remain silent while the official party is entering and the dining-in is formally opened. Below are several DOs and DONTS in respect to military tradition and etiquette that should be followed. (1) DO. A. Arrive at the Network NCO Club early in time to assemble NLT 1800 hrs. B. Introduce yourself to the President and official guests. C. Circulate among the guests and members. There should be at least three members of the mess with the official guest at all times. D. Promptly take your place when the mess call is sounded. E. Check seating arraignments prior to entering the dinning room, but do not enter the dinning room unless you are part or the dinning-in committee. F. Refrain from continual shop talk. (2) DONT A. Engage in loud or boisterous conversations. B. Carry cocktails or lighted cigarettes into the receiving line. C. Drain your glass during a toast. No Bottoms up unless specifically called for by the President. D. Commence a course before the President. E. Sit down at the table, or look at your programs prior to grace. F. Take seats until the President and guest of honor being seated. Refrain from leaning or touching the chair while waiting.

3 PRESIDENT OF THE MESS KEITH A. SNOOK COL, SIGNAL CORPS COMMANDER 93D SIGNAL BRIGADE GUEST SPEAKER PETER M. CUVIELLO MAJOR GENERAL, SIGNAL CORPS COMMANDING GENERAL United States Army Signal Center & Fort Gordon HEAD TABLE MG PETER M. CUVIELLO COL KEITH A. SNOOK LTC JANET A. ZIMMERMAN LTC FREDERICK A. CROSS LTC EARL E. MILLER LTC JORGE MADERA CSM JOHN HOLDEN CSM ALBERT STEELE CSM MIKE MOONEY CSM JAMES F. ALLEN CSM ROBERT MILLER VICE PRESIDENT OF THE MESS (MR. VICE) 2LT RAYMOND DELUCIO A COMPANY, 67TH SIGNAL BATTALION PLATOON LEADER SERGEANT AT ARMS SFC KELLY L. STITZEL B COMPANY, 63RD SIGNAL BATTALION

4 The History of the 93rd Signal Brigade The 93rd Signal Brigade was originally constituted on 3 November 1941 in the Regular Army as the 93rd Signal Battalion and was affiliated with the New England Telephone and Telegraph Company. The affiliation agreement terminated on 29 March 1942, and was renegotiated with the Indiana Bell Telephone Company. Subsequently, the unit was reactivated on 14 May 1942, at Camp Crowder, Missouri. As the U.S. involvement in World War II escalated, the battalion prepared for combat at the Tennessee Maneuver Area, the Desert Training Center at Camp Young, California, and the California-Arizona Maneuver Area. The battalion finally departed from New York aboard the Queen Elizabeth and arrived in England on 26 April Soon after, the battalion was transported to France where it supported forces after the Normandy breakout. The battalion then moved to Luxembourg for the duration of the Ardennes campaign and finally moved to Germany on 9 March 1945, where it remained for the duration of the war. During the war, the battalion received credit for four campaigns to include Northern France, Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace and Central Europe. Upon completion of World War II, the 93rd departed Europe aboard the Texarcana Victory and arrived in Hampton Roads, Virginia on 22 December Soon after, the battalion was inactivated at Camp Patrick Henry, Virginia, on 3 January The battalion was reactivated at Fort Huachuca, Arizona, on 24 February 1955 and assigned to the Sixth Army. The battalion was later reassigned to the 1st Signal Group at Fort Huachuca. On 18 October 1961, the 93rd Signal Battalion departed Charleston, South Carolina, en route to Germany, where it remained until it was again inactivated on 21 September The battalion was again reorganized and activated on 16 March 1981, and redesignated as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 93rd Signal Brigade in Ludwisburg, Germany. The brigade supported VII Corps with its subordinate battalions which included the 26th Signal Battalion (Corps Area) at Heilbronn, Germany, the 34th Signal Battalion (Corps Radio), and the 51st Signal Battalion (Command Operations), both located in Ludwisburg, Germany. Major General Cuviello assumed command of the United States Army Signal Center and Fort Gordon and simultaneously became the Chief of Signal on 11 May Major General Cuviellos awards and decorations include the Defense Superior Service Medal, the Legion of Merit (three Bronze Oak Leaf Clusters), Bronze Star, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal (one Silver Oak Leaf Cluster), Army Commendation Medal (three Bronze Oak Leaf Clusters), Army Achievement Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Service Ribbon (second award), Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal, Vietnamese Signal Badge, Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross Unit Citation Badge, Army Superior Unit Award, and Joint Meritorious Unit Award.

5 93rd Signal Brigade Campaign Participation Credit World War II Central Europe Northern France Defense of Saudi Arabia Rhineland Defense and Liberation of Kuwait Ardennes-Alsace Cease Fire In 1990, the brigade deployed to Saudi Arabia with VII Corps in support of Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm where it earned three more battle streamers: Defense of Saudi Arabia, Liberation and Defense of Kuwait, and Cease Fire. The three battalions were later inactivated in Germany, and the 93rd Signal Brigade colors were returned to Fort Gordon, Georgia, for the Brigades official inactivation on 5 December PETER M. CUVIELLO MAJOR GENERAL, SIGNAL CORPS U.S. Army Signal Center & Fort Gordon Major General Peter M. Cuviello was born in Buffalo, New York. He received his Bachelor of Arts Degree in Political Science from Canisius College and his Masters in Business Administration (Operations Research and Systems Analysis) from the Florida Institute of Technology. His military education includes the Signal Officer Basic and Advanced Courses, Radio Systems Officer Course, Armed Forces Staff College, Army War College, and Army Research Associate Fellowship Program. Major General Cuviello was commissioned through the U.S. Army Reserve Officer Training Corps program on 31 May 1969 and entered active duty at Fort Hood, Texas. His initial assignment was a platoon leader in C Company, 141st Signal Battalion, 1st Armored Division. He was next assigned to the 523rd Signal Battalion, 23rd Infantry Division, in the Republic of Vietnam, as a platoon leader and then as the Division Radio Officer. Between 1971 and 1984, Major General Cuviello served as a staff officer at Headquarters, U.S. Army Strategic Communications Command, Fort Huachuca, Arizona and at the U.S. Army Signal Center, Fort Gordon, Georgia; Commander D Company, 67th Signal Battalion, Fort Gordon, Georgia; Communications Officer for the 1st Signal Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division, and Assistant Division Signal Officer for the 2nd Infantry Division, Camp Casey, Korea; Operations Research Systems Analyst for the Army Concepts and Analysis Agency, Bethesda, Maryland; Communications Duty Officer, J6, for the U.S. European Command, Vaihingen, Germany; and Executive Officer of the 52nd Signal Battalion, Vaihingen, Germany, he commanded the 57th Signal Battalion, 3rd Signal Brigade, Fort Hood, Texas from July 1984 to July Major General Cuviello was the Senior C4 Information Management Area Program Analyst in the Program Analysis and Evaluation Directorate, Office of the Chief of Staff of the Army, then the Deputy Director of Information Systems for Command, Control, Communications, and Computers, Office of the Secretary of the Army, Washington D.C., from 1987 to Brigadier General Cuviello commanded the 3rd Signal Brigade, III Corps, Fort Hood, Texas from July 1992 to July Prior to assuming the duties of Director, Program and Architecture, ODISC4, on 16 June 1997, he was the Director, Command, Control, Communications, Computer and Intelligence Systems (J6), U. S. Southern Command, Panama.


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