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Spatial behavior and choice of habitat on migratory stopover site in European Robins (Erithacus rubecula): a telemetry study Arseny Tsvey and Pavel Ktitorov.

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Presentation on theme: "Spatial behavior and choice of habitat on migratory stopover site in European Robins (Erithacus rubecula): a telemetry study Arseny Tsvey and Pavel Ktitorov."— Presentation transcript:

1 Spatial behavior and choice of habitat on migratory stopover site in European Robins (Erithacus rubecula): a telemetry study Arseny Tsvey and Pavel Ktitorov Biological Station Rybachy Biological Station Rybachy Zoological Institute Zoological Institute Russia Russia

2 Objectives of the study ► Evaluation of general pattern of spatial behavior ► Studying the possible difference in space use between spring and autumn, fat and lean individuals ► Studying of habitat use in spring and in autumn

3 Asia Europe Atlantic ocean Africa Geographic position of the study plot Study plot Baltic sea Lithuania Courish spit (length – 100km Width – 400 – 3000 m) Courish gulf Russia

4 AutumnSpring 2013 Number of marked birds Robin with transmitter antenna Holohil Systems Ltd. Model: LB-2 Weight: 0.46g – 0.5g Lifespan: up 21 days Transmitters:

5 Stopover duration of marked robins. Data for autumn and spring are pooled.

6 Examples of movement path during the first day of stopover 100 m Capture/release site Baltic Sea Courish gulf N 951 m Autumn

7 Examples of movement path during the first day of stopover 100 m Capture/release site Baltic Sea Courish gulf N 512 m Spring

8 Examples of movement path during the first day of stopover 100 m Capture/release site Baltic Sea Courish gulf N Autumn 438 m

9 Typical features of spatial behavior during the first day of stopover Stationary period after release

10 Typical features of spatial behavior during the first day of stopover Active movement during part of the day and movement within temporary home range during the remaining time

11 Active movements and movements within a temporary home range 100 m Capture/release site Baltic Sea Courish gulf N Autumn Active movements Temporary home range

12 Active movements and movements within a temporary home range 100 m Capture/release site Baltic Sea Courish gulf N Spring Active movements Temporary home ranges

13 Active movements and movements within a temporary home range 100 m Capture/release site Baltic Sea Courish gulf N Autumn Active movements Temporary home range

14 Typical features of spatial behavior during the first day of stopover Active movement during part of the day and movement within temporary home range during the remaining time

15 Total distance covered during the first day of stopover

16

17 Orientation of movements during the first day of stopover Autumn, р<0.05Spring, p>0.1

18 Spatial distribution of individual temporal home ranges (MCPs) during autumn m Capture/release site Baltic Sea Courish gulf N

19 Spatial distribution of individual temporal home ranges (MCPs) during spring m Capture/release site Baltic Sea Courish gulf N

20 Size of temporary home range areas in spring and autumn and in lean and fat individuals Lim: 2113 – m 2 Mean ± m 2

21 Spatial behavior during the second and subsequent days of stopover AutumnSpring m Baltic Sea N Autumn Capture/release site An example of temporary range fidelity Stopover duration – 6 days

22 Spatial behavior during the second and subsequent days of stopover AutumnSpring m Baltic Sea N Autumn Capture/release site An example of temporary range infidelity Stopover duration – 2 days

23 Habitat types at the study area Open dune Dune with shrubs Beach Grass Grass with shrubs Young pine forest Pine forest Deciduous forest Baltic Sea Courish gulf 1 km Pine forestDeciduous forestOpen habitats

24 Distribution of individual home ranges (MSPs) within different habitat types in the study area. Open dune Dune with shrubs Beach Grass Grass with shrubs Young pine forest Pine forest Deciduous forest Baltic Sea Courish gulf 1 km Autumn MCPs

25 Distribution of individual home ranges (MSPs) within different habitat types in the study area. Open dune Dune with shrubs Beach Grass Grass with shrubs Young pine forest Pine forest Deciduous forest Baltic Sea Courish gulf 1 km Spring MCPs

26 Area of available habitats in spring and autumn Open dune Dune with shrubs Beach Grass Grass with shrubs Young pine forest Pine forest Deciduous forest Baltic Sea Courish gulf Spring Autumn

27 Results of compositional analysis of habitat preference in robins on migratory stopover Lambda0.87 χ2χ2χ2χ21.71 p0.43 Random p 0.53 Pine forest > deciduous forest > open habitats >>> denotes a significant difference between two consecutively ranked variables Lambda0.61 χ2χ2χ2χ29.84 p0.007 Random p deciduous forest > pine forest >>> open habitats >>> denotes a significant difference between two consecutively ranked variables

28 Biomass of invertebrates during spring and autumn in two main habitat types deciduous coniferous

29 Correlates of robin’s behavior with invertebrates abundance 1 The total distance of movement during the first day of stopover is shorter in autumn than in spring The biomass of invertebrates is higher in autumn compared with spring 2 In spring the total distance of movements after landing decreases with the progress of season The biomass of invertebrates increases with the progress of spring season 3There is no difference in use of the two main habitat types (humid deciduous forest and pine forest) There is no difference in biomass of invertebrates between the two main habitat types (humid deci- duous forest and pine forest)

30 Main conclusions ► Movements of European robins at day time stopovers after completing migratory flights are a specific behavior, not directly related to flights themselves. ► The general pattern of movements of most robins during the first day of stopover includes active movement during a certain period of time, and then movements within one or two temporary home ranges. ► Spatial behavior of robins is related to their energy status. Generally, fat birds are less mobile than lean ones. ► Our results suggest that the general pattern of spatial behavior at stopovers depends on food abundance and availability

31 Thank you very much for your attention Acknowledgements: We are grateful to everybody who helped us with this study. Special thanks to: Casimir Bolshakov, Nicolai Poeplau, Maxim Dubinin, Jan Peyrat and Nikita Chernetsov


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