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E-Learning in the Disciplines| slide 1 e-Learning in the Disciplines John Cook Centre Manager, Reusable Learning Objects CETL Helen Beetham Research Consultant,

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Presentation on theme: "E-Learning in the Disciplines| slide 1 e-Learning in the Disciplines John Cook Centre Manager, Reusable Learning Objects CETL Helen Beetham Research Consultant,"— Presentation transcript:

1 E-Learning in the Disciplines| slide 1 e-Learning in the Disciplines John Cook Centre Manager, Reusable Learning Objects CETL Helen Beetham Research Consultant, JISC e-learning programme

2 E-Learning in the Disciplines| slide 2 Aims Articulate the essential features of learning and teaching across different subject areas and educational approaches –curriculum outcomes, challenges, learner characteristics… Relate these to features of different e-learning technologies and applications –to identify aspects of e-learning that may be of benefit to different communities Encourage discussion (this Symposium) around: –differences between disciplines and educational approaches –similarities and what we can learn from each other

3 E-Learning in the Disciplines| slide 3 Two key commitments e-learning is not a separate kind of learning –we need to re-articulate learning in a new technological context People learn in a multitude of ways –different subject areas and educational approaches rely on different capacities-to-learn –different communities have evolved different cultures of learning and teaching –we need to recognise these differences, while learning from one another

4 E-Learning in the Disciplines| slide 4 Reflective tools Download a reflective questionnaire –articulate educational priorities, outcomes and challenges –consider relevant e-learning technologies and applications –can be shared with your own and other communities View examples of completed reflections –see summaries of previous cognate group discussions –post your own completed reflection by ing it to NB these materials are no longer hosted by the HE Academy but are separately available on the Design Studio

5 E-Learning in the Disciplines| slide 5 Useful questions In an ALT-C 2005 Symposium, Pearce, Gulc et al. asked: Is subject difference a factor in the use and uptake of e- learning? Put another way: What technologies and approaches are used in the different communities?

6 E-Learning in the Disciplines| slide 6 Blinded by our paradigms? First ATM was located inside a bank and was available only during banking hours. Real innovation did not occur until ATMs were placed outside the bank

7 E-Learning in the Disciplines| slide 7 Disciplinary patterns Academic tribes and territories (Becher and Trowler, 2001) –definitions of knowledge, disciplinary organisation Teaching and learning regimes (Trowler and Cooper, 2002) –tacit knowledge, troublesome knowledge... need to develop genuinely shared language

8 E-Learning in the Disciplines| slide 8 Disciplinary patterns of educational technology adoption Discipline differences appeared to be potential barrier to the building of new communities of practice around educational technology, and there was a need to know more about how disciplinary factors are influencing the early adopters who form the core of our new communities. Carol Russell (2005, p. 64)

9 E-Learning in the Disciplines| slide 9 appliedpure soft hard discoveries explanations processes protocols products techniques understanding interpretation based on Becher and Trowler (2001), taken from Russells ALT-C slides maths chemistry art theory sociology education engineering physics law design history medicine english literature biology information management Knowledge territories

10 E-Learning in the Disciplines| slide 10 Disciplinary patterns of educational technology adoption Note that the placing and configuration of the disciplines on the above model will vary between institutions Where do technologies and approaches fit in? Russell found the following.

11 E-Learning in the Disciplines| slide 11 Common features of strategies for hard applied disciplines External changes in profession/industry (industry and student context) Technology now essential in gaining core discipline knowledge Educational technology helps students learn –more engaging or flexible

12 E-Learning in the Disciplines| slide 12 Common features of strategies for soft applied disciplines Professional knowledge being redefined –technology can help develop new skills Technology for skills and information transfer –to free class time for developing core knowledge

13 E-Learning in the Disciplines| slide 13 Common features of strategies for hard/soft pure disciplines Technology can help students engage with core concepts –when staff time and resources are limited Knowledge is created through research –Technology can help develop research skills

14 E-Learning in the Disciplines| slide 14 Computers: what are they good for?

15 E-Learning in the Disciplines| slide 15 The new paradigm Digital computer marked a paradigm shift –networked computer –mobile and wireless networks But all learning involves ICT, broadly understood –all learning is potentially e-learning Different technologies revolutionise different subject areas/approaches in different ways, at different moments in time ICT is having major impact on learning organisations: –centralisation/unification of admin systems –differentiation of subject, department and individual needs –continuous or whitewater change

16 E-Learning in the Disciplines| slide 16 Narrative or representational uses ICT used to present information Potential advantages include: Multiple media Rich media: video, audio, animation, simulation… Hypermedia: multiple pathways (Interactive and adaptive media) Ubiquity and access Learner control of production and distribution: file sharing, wikis…

17 E-Learning in the Disciplines| slide 17 Communicative or social uses ICT used for communication and to support collaboration Potential advantages include: Multiple media Explicit nature of communication Learner control of pace and timing Recording, review, reflection Ubiquity, access and sharing

18 E-Learning in the Disciplines| slide 18 Productive uses ICT used to manipulate data or information Potential advantages include: Processing power – text, images, numbers, scenarios, gameplays etc Automation of routine tasks – focus on higher order skills Repetition and consistency Discipline-specific uses Enhanced skills for professional/research employment (e.g. using authentic tools)

19 E-Learning in the Disciplines| slide 19 Interactive or Adaptive uses ICT used to adapt to, or return information based on, user input, e.g. computer games, simulations: also search engines, database-driven resources and services, assessment systems… Potential advantages include: Active engagement Intrinsic feedback that is rapid and consistent Powerful, time-saving information management Low cost and risk simulations (compared with real-world interactions) Accessible and ubiquitous Learner skills (relevant to professional/research employment)

20 E-Learning in the Disciplines| slide 20 Integrative uses ICT used to integrate or manage learning Potential advantages include: Information relevant to learning can be efficiently organised, managed, captured, and presented for assessment/review Time savings for teachers, learners and assessors Reliability and transparency of information processes Consistent identity or brand for learners to relate to Improved monitoring Potential for learners to have greater control over their own learning, and records of learning

21 E-Learning in the Disciplines| slide 21 Classification based on Laurillard (1992/2002) Rethinking University Teaching Narrative Communicative Productive Adaptive/Interactive (Integrative) Could also think about uses of technology in terms of: Access and accessibility Differentiation Learner control Collaboration and sharing ICT skills for professional/research practice

22 E-Learning in the Disciplines| slide 22 Group work In subject groups (NB you may find as many differences as likenesses!) Focus on key curriculum outcomes: reflective question 2 Identify at least 3 outcomes (areas of skill, knowledge or understanding) that are characteristic of your subject communities What new outcomes are emerging in response to new demands, including ICT? Focus on key challenges facing your community: reflective questions 2-4 Identify at least 3 challenges (e.g. relating to learners, changing curricula etc) that are characteristic of your subject communities What new challenges are emerging, including those arising from ICT? (If time) identify any technologies, or uses of technology, that might help to address these outcomes and challenges Facilitator to feed back to the plenary session (5 mins)

23 E-Learning in the Disciplines| slide 23 Reporting back to your community Share reflective document Communicate e-learning advantages in pedagogic rather than technical terms Discuss how e-learning support can be integrated with other activities of the Subject Centre or CETL Identify key priorities for e-learning support Identify key projects and developments in e-learning that may be of benefit to the community Identify gaps or biases in current e-learning developments that mean community needs are not being met


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