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MST for Serious Emotional Disturbance (SED) n Outcomes from Randomized Trials n MST Adaptations to Treat Youths Presenting Serious Mental Health Problems.

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Presentation on theme: "MST for Serious Emotional Disturbance (SED) n Outcomes from Randomized Trials n MST Adaptations to Treat Youths Presenting Serious Mental Health Problems."— Presentation transcript:

1 MST for Serious Emotional Disturbance (SED) n Outcomes from Randomized Trials n MST Adaptations to Treat Youths Presenting Serious Mental Health Problems and Their Families n Status of the Transport of MST-SED to Community Settings

2 MST as an Alternative to Psychiatric Hospitalization for Youths in Psychiatric Crisis NIMH R01 MH51852 Family Services Research Center Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences Medical University of South Carolina (PI: Scott W. Henggeler) Publications available at

3 Study Purpose Can a well-specified family-based intervention, MST, serve as a viable alternative to psychiatric hospitalization for addressing mental health emergencies presented by children and adolescents?

4 Design Random assignment to home-based MST vs. inpatient psychiatric hospitalization Assessments: T1--within 24 hours of recruitment T2--post hospitalization (typically 2 weeks post recruitment) T3--post MST--4 months post recruitment T4--6 months post T3 T5--12 months post T3 T6--30 months post T3

5 Participant Inclusion Criteria: F Emergent psychiatric hospitalization for suicidal, homicidal, psychotic, or risk of harm to self/others F Age years F Residence in Charleston County F Medicaid funded or no health insurance F Existence of a non-institutional residential environment (e.g., family home, kinship home, foster home, shelter)

6 Participant Characteristics (N = 156) R Average age = 12.9 years R 65% male R 65% African American, 33% Caucasian R 51% lived in single-parent households R 31% lived in 2-parent households R 18% lived with someone other than a biological/adoptive parent R $592 median family monthly income from employment R 70% received AFDC, food stamps, or SSI R 79% Medicaid

7 Primary Reason for Psychiatric Hospitalization â 38% suicidal ideation, plan, or attempt â 37% posed threat of harm to self or others â 17% homicidal ideation, plan, or attempt â 8% psychotic * based on approval by a mental health professional who was not affiliated with the study

8 Youth Histories at Intake G 35% had prior arrests G 85% had prior psychiatric treatments G 35% had prior psychiatric hospitalizations G Mean # DISC Diagnoses at Intake ä Caregiver report2.89 ä Youth report1.78

9 Clinical Experiences & Solutions Significant parental psychopathology  26% cg SUD (65% of these with co-morbid mental d/o)  57% cg with mental health d/o (35% co-morbid SUD)  cg GSI/BSI significantly elevated compared to MST Drug Court Study parents   psychiatric resources to caregivers   therapist training in EBT for SUD (CRA)   therapist training in EBT for MH disorders (depression, BPAD and borderline pdo)

10 Clinical Experiences & Solutions II Youth exhibited greater psychopathology  Externalizing & Internalizing CBCL - 2 SD above the mean  GSI of BSI significantly elevated   psychiatric resources to youth   therapist training in EBT for youth   therapist resources (next slide)

11 Therapist Support Modifications  Hiring changes - trained in EBT, masters required  Supervisory changes -  time in office and in field,  QA protocols (audiotapes),  caseloads,  systems- level intervention help (schools, courts).  Clinical additions - Crisis caseworker position established; psychopharm.  Resource enrichment -  continuum of placements available (respite beds, temporary foster care)

12 MST as an Alternative to Psychiatric Hospitalization for Youths in Psychiatric Crisis Implementation

13 ? Recruitment Rate: 90% (160 of 177 families consented) ? Research Retention Rates: 98% at T1, 97.5% for T2 through T5!! ? MST Treatment Completion: 94% (74 of 79 families) - full course of MST mean duration = 127 days mean time in direct contact = 92 hours

14 Post-treatment Outcomes (T3, n=113) Favoring MST j  Externalizing symptoms - parent & teacher CBCL j Decreased suicide attempts (Huey) j Trend for  adolescent alcohol use - PEI self report j  Family cohesion - caregiver FACES j  Family structure - adolescent FACES j  School attendance j 72% reduction in days hospitalized j 50% reduction in other out of home placements j  Youth & caregiver satisfaction FAVORING HOSPITAL CONDITION: j  Youth self-esteem

15 MST as an Alternative to Psychiatric Hospitalization for Youths in Psychiatric Crisis What about the long-term outcomes?

16 Youth Mental Health Outcomes T1 - T5 (1 year post-treatment) Youth GSI of BSI  MST and US groups - both significantly better over time  Significant difference in symptom trajectory between groups  No difference between groups at T5  Both groups sub-clinical at T5

17 Youth Reports on GSI of BSI {Psychological Distress}

18 Percent Days in Placement with Family

19 Percent Days in Regular School Setting

20 Summary a Across treatment conditions & respondents - psychopathology symptoms improved to sub- clinical range by months. a Groups reached improved symptoms with significantly different trajectories. a During treatment (4 months), MST was significantly better at promoting youths functional outcomes, yet these improvements were not maintained post-treatment.

21 Summary II J Key measures of functioning showed deterioration across treatment conditions. g Adolescents with serious emotional disturbance are at high risk for failure to meet critical developmental challenges

22 MST for Youth with SED  A Work in Progress  J Lengthen treatment J Provide continuum of services (respite, hospitalization as well as home-based) J Rigorous integration of EBP J Treat the entire family J Continue research J Ongoing continuum studies – Hawaii and Philadelphia J Future community-based pilots

23 MST COC in Hawaii Promising Findings for MST j Rowland et al. (2005). Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders j CBCL Externalizing - youth report (p =.05) j  Dangerousness on YRBS - youth report (p <.05) j  Days in out-of-home placement

24 MST COC in Hawaii Promising Findings for MST II j Marginal improved caregiver satisfaction with social supports (p =.07) j 66%  days in regular school settings j Marginally  in criminal activity (p =.07) j Archival data -  the crime rate of US youth

25 MST-Based Continuum of Care in Philadelphia City of Philadelphia Department of Health Behavioral Health System Wordsworth Family Services Research Center Medical University of South Carolina Annie E. Casey Foundation

26 State of Transportability for MST-SED Recruiting pilot sites n with strong psychiatric support n within Network Partners n excluding youths in acute crisis


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