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Writing about Sound in Poetry. Credit Adapted from Mary Olivers A Poetry Handbook.

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Presentation on theme: "Writing about Sound in Poetry. Credit Adapted from Mary Olivers A Poetry Handbook."— Presentation transcript:

1 Writing about Sound in Poetry

2 Credit Adapted from Mary Olivers A Poetry Handbook

3 Sound Matters 4 To MAKE A POEM, we must make sounds. Not random sounds, but chosen sounds. 4 How much does it matter what kinds of sounds we make? How do we choose what sounds to make? 4 "Go!" does not sound like "Stop!" Also, in some way, the words do not feel the same.

4 Our Alphabet was derived by letters onomatoepoetic meaning 4 From an 1860s Grammar textbook: 4 The letters are divided into two general classes, vowels and consonants. 4 A vowel forms a perfect sound when uttered alone. A consonant cannot be perfectly uttered till joined to a vowel. 4 The vowels are a, e, i, o, u, and sometimes w and y. All the other letters are consonants. 4 (W or y is called a consonant when it precedes a vowel heard in the same syllable, as in wine, twine, whine. In all other cases these letters are vowels, as in newly, dewy, and eyebrow.)

5 Consonants 4 The consonants are divided into semivowels and mutes. 4 There are 8 mutes and 11 semivowels. 4 Mutes: b, d, k, p, q, t, c, g. They cannot be sounded without a vowel, and they stop the sound suddenly when uttered. 4 A semivowel is a consonant that can be imperfectly sounded without a vowel so that at the end of a syllable its sound may be protracted, as l, n, z, in al, an, az. 4 The semivowels are f, h, j, l, m, n, r, s, v, w, x, y, z, and c and g soft. But w or y at the end of a syllable is a vowel. And the sound of c, f g, h, j, s, or x can be protracted only as an aspirate, or strong breath. 4 Four of the semivowels -- l, m, n, and r -- are termed liquids, on account of the fluency of their sounds. 4 Four others -- v, w, y, and z -- are likewise more vocal than the aspirates. 4 A mute is a consonant that cannot be sounded at all without a vowel, and which at the end of a syllable suddenly stops the breath, as k, p. t, in ak, ap, at. 4 The mutes are eight: b, d, k, p. q, t, and c and g hard. Three of these -- k, g, and c hard-sound exactly alike. B, d, and g hard stop the voice less suddenly than the rest. 4 Here we begin to understand that our working material -- the alphabet -- represents families of sounds rather than random sounds. Here are mutes, liquids, aspirates -- vowels, semivowels, and consonants. Now we see that words have not only a definition and possibly a connotation, but also the felt quality of their own kind of sound. 4.

6 Mutes 4 Mutes: b, d, k, p, q, t, c, g. They cannot be sounded without a vowel, and they stop the sound suddenly when uttered. (Yuk, Tap, Ot all stop suddenly) 4 The harshest mutes are k, c (hard), and g (hard). B and D are less harsh but still are harsh.

7 Semivowels 4 F, h, j, l, m, n, r, s, v, w, x, y, z, c (soft), g (soft) 4 A semivowel is a consonant that can be imperfectly sounded without a vowel so that at the end of a syllable its sound may be protracted, as l, n, z, in al, an, az. 4 Four of the semivowels -- l, m, n, and r -- are termed liquids, on account of the fluency of their sounds. They can be protracted a long time.

8 So what? Look at these examples: 4 1. Hush! Vs Please be quiet! vs Shut up!

9 Hush! Has no mutes at all: its all vowels and semivowels. 4 The tone is soft… we might use it to quiet a child when we dont want to give any sense of disturbance or anger. 4 The sound of the word, created by the letters, creates this effect.

10 Please be quiet! Slightly curt, but tone remains civil. We might use it in the theater when asking strangers to stop talking. The phrase contains four mutes – p, b, q, and t, but in almost every case the mute is instantly calmed down, twice by a vowel and once by a liquid. vs Shut up!

11 Shut up! It is abrupt, and indicates impatience and anger. 4 The mutes (t and p) are not softened; rather, the vowel precedes them; the mutes are the final expbrittle explostion of the word. Both words slap shut upon their utterance, with a mute. 4 The sounds creates the connotation of word.

12 Stone vs. Rock What makes the stone seems like something weather-smoothed and –softened, whereas the rock seems to something jutting and angled? Examine how the sounds of the words are created using different types of letters.

13 Stone vs. Rock -- continued 4 Stone has a mute near the beginning of the word that then is softened by a vowel. Rock ends with the mute k. That k suddenly stops the breath. There is a seed of silence at the edge of the harsh sound. Brief though it is, it is definite, and cannot be denied, and it feels very different from the -one ending of stone.


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