Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Return to Menu Return to Menu Passage A Passage A Passage B Passage B.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Return to Menu Return to Menu Passage A Passage A Passage B Passage B."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Return to Menu Return to Menu Passage A Passage A Passage B Passage B

3 Passage A Think About ItThink About ItThink About ItThink About It Read About ItRead About ItRead About ItRead About It Talk About ItTalk About ItTalk About ItTalk About It Write About ItWrite About ItWrite About ItWrite About It

4 1.What do you know about copyright? Reference: Open

5 2.What do you think of piracy? Reference: Open

6 3.What kinds of activities are considered as violating copyright? Reference: Open

7 Read About It Language PointsLanguage PointsLanguage PointsLanguage Points Content AwarenessContent AwarenessContent AwarenessContent Awareness Language FocusLanguage FocusLanguage FocusLanguage Focus

8 10 Big Myths About Copyright 1)If it doesnt have a copyright notice, its not copyrighted. This was true in the past, but today almost all major nations follow the Berne1 copyright convention. For example, in the USA, almost everything created privately and originally after April 1,follow 1989 is copyrighted and protected whether it has a notice or not. The default you should assume for other peoples works is that they are copyrighted and may not be copied unless you know otherwise. There are some old works that lost protection without notice, but frankly you should not risk it unless you know for sure.whether it has a notice or notThe default you should assume for other peoples works is that they are copyrightedrisk

9 2) If I dont charge for it, its not a violation. False. Whether you charge can affect the damages awarded in court, but thats the main difference under the law. Its still a violation if you give it away – and there can still be serious damages if you hurt the commercial value of the property. There is an exception for personal copying of music, which is not a violation, though courts seem to have said that doesnt include wide-scale anonymous personal copying as Napster. If the work has no commercial value, the violation is mostly technical and is unlikely to result in legal action.in courtNapster is unlikely toresult in 3) If its posted to Usenet its in the public domain. False. Nothing modern is in the public domain anymore unless the owner

10 explicitly puts it in the public domain. Explicitly, as you have a note from the author/owner saying, I grant this to the public domain. 4) My posting was just fair use! The fair use exemption to (U.S.) copyright law was created to allow things such as commentary, parody, news reporting, research and education about copyrighted works without the permission of the author. Thats important so that copyright law doesnt block your freedom to express your own works. Intent and damage to the commercial value of the work are important considerations. Are you reproducing an article from the New York Times because you couldnt find time to write your own story, orThats important so that copyright law doesnt block your freedom to express your own works Intent and damage to the commercial value of the work are important considerations

11 didnt want your readers to have to pay for the New York Times web site? They arent fair use. Fair use is usually a short excerpt. 5) If you dont defend your copyright you lose it. – Somebody has that name copyrighted! False. Copyright is effectively never lost these days, unless explicitly given away. You also cant copyright a name or anything short like that, such as almost all titles. You may be thinking of trademarks, which apply to names, and can be weakened or lost if not defended. Like an Apple computer. Apple Computer owns that word applied to computers, even though it is also an ordinary word. Apple Records owns it when applied to music. Neither owns the word on its own, only in context, and owning a mark doesnt mean complete controlor anything

12 6) If I make up my own stories, but base them on another work, my new work belongs to me. False. U.S. Copyright law is quite explicit that the making of what are called derivative works works based on or derived from another copyrighted work is the exclusive province of the owner of the original work. This is true even though the making of these new worksmake up based on derived fromis the exclusive province of the owner of the original work is a highly creative process. If you write a story using settings or characters from somebody elses work, you need that authors permission. 7) They cant get me, defendants in court have powerful rights! Copyright law is mostly civil law. If you violate copyright you would not be charged with a crime, but usually get sued.be charged with

13 8) Oh, so copyright violation isnt a crime or anything? Actually, recently in the USA commercial copyright violation involving more than 10 copies and value over $2500 was made a felony. So watch out. On the other hand, this is a fairly new, untested statute. In one case an operator of a pirate BBS that didnt charge was acquitted because he didnt charge, but congress amended the law to cover that.cover 9) It doesnt hurt anybody in fact its free advertising. Its up to the owners to decide if they want the free ads or not. If they want them, they will be sure to contact you. Dont rationalize whether it hurts the owners or not, ask them. Usually thats not too hard to do. Even if you cant think of how the author or owner gets hurt, thinks up to

14 about the fact that piracy on the net hurts everybody who wants a chance to use this wonderful new technology to do more than read other peoples flamewars.who wants a chance to use this wonderful new technology to do more than read other peoples flamewars 10) They ed me a copy, so I can post it. To have a copy is not to have the copyright. All the you write is copyrighted. However, is not unless previously agreed. So you can certainly report on what you are sent, and reveal what it says. You can even quote parts of it to demonstrate. Frankly, somebody who sues

15 over an ordinary message would almost surely get no damages, because the message has no commercial value, but if you want to stay strictly in the law, you should ask first. On the other hand, dont go nuts if somebody posts you sent them. If it was an ordinary non-secret personal letter of minimal commercial value with no copyright notice (like 99.9% of all ), you probably wont get any damages if you sue them.but if you want to stay strictly in the law, you should ask first (879 words)

16 A famous on-line company and music distribution service, it was known for supplying free music such as Mp3, etc. Website: Napster

17 follow v. to act in agreement or compliance with; obeyto act in agreement or compliance with; obey Examples All students must follow the school rules.All students must follow the school rules. As a citizen, you must follow the law or you will be punished.As a citizen, you must follow the law or you will be punished.

18 whether…or not /whether or not allowing the negative alternativeallowing the negative alternative Examples Whether or not it rains, Im giving a party tomorrow.Whether or not it rains, Im giving a party tomorrow. I should do this job whether they agree or not.I should do this job whether they agree or not.

19 The default you should assume for other peoples works is that they are copyrighted. You should instantly think that others works are already protected by copyright law … Paraphrase

20 In court Examples The poor man was sentenced to death in court.The poor man was sentenced to death in court. out of court The case was settled out of court.The case was settled out of court.

21 be unlikely to / be unlikely that be improbable to be improbable to Examples They are unlikely to come since the weather is so bad.They are unlikely to come since the weather is so bad. It was very unlikely that he would do that.It was very unlikely that he would do that.

22 result in to bring about to bring about Examples It is reported that the heavy rain resulted in a serious road accident.It is reported that the heavy rain resulted in a serious road accident. result from: to come about, happen It is reported that the serious road accident resulted from the heavy rain.It is reported that the serious road accident resulted from the heavy rain.

23 risk v. to expose to a chance of loss or damage; to incur the risk of (gerund is followed by this word)to expose to a chance of loss or damage; to incur the risk of (gerund is followed by this word) Examples They risked driving on, notwithstanding the storm.They risked driving on, notwithstanding the storm.

24 so that in order thatin order that Examples Tom had to stop climbing the mountain so that his sister could catch up.Tom had to stop climbing the mountain so that his sister could catch up. Speak clearly, so that they can understand the obscure passage.Speak clearly, so that they can understand the obscure passage. Thats important so that copyright law doesnt block your freedom to express your own works. More to learn More to learn

25 Thats important so that copyright law doesnt block your freedom to express your own works. That's important in order that copyright law doesnt block your freedom to express your own works. Paraphrase

26 Intent and damage to the commercial value of the work are important considerations You must think it cautiously if you damage the commercial value of the work intentionally. Paraphrase

27 or anything show another kind of possibilityshow another kind of possibility Examples If she wants to call me or anything, I'll be here all day.If she wants to call me or anything, I'll be here all day.

28 make up to put together; construct or compose; invent; fabricateto put together; construct or compose; invent; fabricate Examples My four-year old son actually made up a poem.My four-year old son actually made up a poem. Being afraid to be scolded by his teacher, he made up an excuse.Being afraid to be scolded by his teacher, he made up an excuse.

29 be based on to find a basis for; establishto find a basis for; establish Examples This news report is based entirely on facts.This news report is based entirely on facts. Judgment should be based on facts, not on hearsay.Judgment should be based on facts, not on hearsay.

30 derive from to obtain or receive from a source; to arrive at by reasoning; deduce or inferto obtain or receive from a source; to arrive at by reasoning; deduce or infer Examples Many English words are derived from Latin.Many English words are derived from Latin. We derive knowledge not only from books, but also from practice.We derive knowledge not only from books, but also from practice.

31 …is the exclusive province of the owner of the original work... is the exclusive part of the owner of the original work. Paraphrase

32 be charged with be legally accused ofbe legally accused of Examples He was charged with murder, but three days later he was freed due to lack of evidence.He was charged with murder, but three days later he was freed due to lack of evidence.

33 cover v. to amend, supply a gap, make up for (here)to amend, supply a gap, make up for (here) Examples A new rule was proposed to cover this point that people have the right to cross roads in spite of read or green light when in a state of emergency.A new rule was proposed to cover this point that people have the right to cross roads in spite of read or green light when in a state of emergency.

34 be up to be left to sb to (do)be left to sb to (do) Examples Its up to us to give them all the help we can.Its up to us to give them all the help we can. Its up to you to decide who will go with you.Its up to you to decide who will go with you.

35 more than Examples He was frightened more than angry.He was frightened more than angry. He likes summers more than autumn.He likes summers more than autumn. who wants a chance to use this wonderful new technology to do more than read other peoples flamewars More to learn More to learn

36 but if you want to stay strictly in the law, you should ask first But if you want to be within the law, you should ask for agreement first. Paraphrase

37 who wants a chance to use this wonderful new technology to do more than read other peoples flamewars Originally many people want to use the technology to do more meaningful things rather than reading the arguments and debates on the net Paraphrase

38 Passage B Think About ItThink About ItThink About ItThink About It Read About ItRead About ItRead About ItRead About It

39 Before reading Passage B, try to describe the following pictures to your classmates.

40 1. Have you every bought a pirated product? Why did you buy it? Open. Reference:

41 2. Do you download anything from Internet? What kind of things do you usually download? Open. Reference:

42 3. Have you ever faced a situation where you are violating copyright? Open Reference:

43 Read About It Language PointsLanguage PointsLanguage PointsLanguage Points Content AwarenessContent AwarenessContent AwarenessContent Awareness Language FocusLanguage FocusLanguage FocusLanguage Focus Reading Skill PracticeReading Skill PracticeReading Skill PracticeReading Skill Practice Translating Skill PracticeTranslating Skill PracticeTranslating Skill PracticeTranslating Skill Practice

44 Are You a Copyright Criminal? It s getting more tempting to infringe on copyright when creating presentations, thanks to many new scanning and duplicating technologies as well as proliferating Web content. But writers, designers, artists and copyright owners are becoming more aggressive, using new tactics and technologies to enforce their rights. If you don't know the rules, you could end up on the wrongthanks toend up side of a lawsuit. You've seen them at work. Sometimes brazen, sometimes oblivious,

45 they break the law without giving it a second thought. Maybe, without even knowing it, youre one of them. Theyre copyright claim-jumpers presenters who slip "Dilbert" cartoons, photographs scanned from magazines, graphics downloaded from the Web, photocopies of trade-journal articles, audio files, video clips or CD music into their presentations or handouts with little or no understanding of how they're trampling on someone elses copyright.trampling on Some do it knowingly, assuming their chances of getting nabbed

46 are a small risk for the big payoff of easy access to high-quality prefabricated content. Others are unaware of how their seemingly benign reuse of pre-existing material articles, pictures, music, songs, scripts or film clips violates copyright law. Autumn Bell, a training specialist and frequent presenter for the University of New Mexico, says she witnessed her share of copyright abuses in a past life working for a telecommunications company. There, she worked with managers who ordered people to copy other companies training materials to save money. She also saw plenty of lesser violations, such as flagrant photocopying of manuals and books for mass distribution. In six years, Bell says, Never once didwitnessed Never once did

47 I hear the word copyright spokenI hear the word copyright spoken. It can be easy for busy presenters to give copyright concerns short shrift; after all, there are deadlines to hit and rehearsals to do. And sometimes that article you read last week in Forbes Magazine or thatgive copyright concerns short shrift; photo you downloaded from the Web yesterday fits perfectly into the presentation you're giving tomorrow. Copyright permission? Who has time? Some token attribution ought to do it, you figure. Surely the copyright owners will welcome the free advertising, right? And what are the chances that they'll even find out?what are the chances that they'll even find out?

48 The reality is: Whether the bulk of your presentations are in-house or to external audiences, your odds of being caught violating copyright are improving every day, as are your chances of paying a stiff fine. Statutory damages for infringing on copyright can hit $ per violation, and they can go as high as $ in some circumstances of willful violation and thats above and beyond the fine for actual damages. Furthermore, commercial copyright violation involving more than 10 copies and a value of more than $2 500 is now a felony in the United States. In one recent case, a corporation paid a seven-figure settlement for

49 its unauthorized photocopying of articles from a trade journal and archiving those copies for internal distribution. With similar violations occurring almost daily in corporate America, and with an increase in piracy on the World Wide Web, licensing organizations, performing- rights societies and other copyright cops have stepped up activity to enforce their rights.stepped up activity to The Training Media Association, a watchdog for training-video vendors, offers a $ bounty for reporting illegal copying or unauthorized public performance of off-the-shelf training videos. A temporary-employment agency recently paid a six-figure out-of-court

50 fee after one of its employees reported it to the TMA for making illegal copies of four videos (the agency had no license to do so) and sending the copies out for use in its 50 offices. United Media the distributor of Dilbert cartoons, has been asking people to take illegally imported Dilbert cartoons off their Web and intranet sites. ASCAP and BMI, two organizations that license the right to play copyrighted music in public settings (including most business-presentation scenarios) have reportedly added large conference centers and hotels to the list of sites they patrol to ensure that those using even small selections of pre-recorded music in presentations are properly licensed to do so.ASCAP and BMI, two organizations that license the right to play copyrighted music in public settings (including most business-presentation scenarios) have reportedly added large conference centers and hotels to the list of sites they patrol to ensure that those using even small selections of pre-recorded music in presentations are properly licensed to do so Is all this talk of copyright abuse overblown? Is the perceived need

51 to protect yourself from prosecution just another anal-retentive legal formality? And arent the most flagrant abusers a small segment of the presentation community? Youd be surprised at the answers. Although many cases of abuse undoubtedly are small or accidental busy presenters who in good faith give full attribution but dont seek permission; others who are unaware of public performance rights or who stretch the fair-use doctrine to its limits interviews and research conducted for this article indicate a serious lack of knowledge about copyright law among frequent presenters. A two-month review of comments posted to listservs frequented by presenters and trainers, for instance, suggests that many people routinely violate copyright law, and that there is a general lack ofAlthough many cases of abuse undoubtedly are small or accidental busy presenters who in good faith give full attribution but dont seek permission; others who are unaware of public performance rights or who stretch the fair-use doctrine to its limits interviews and research conducted for this article indicate a serious lack of knowledge about copyright law among frequent presenters

52 understanding about what constitutes legal use. Indeed, a 1993 survey by the Training Media Association found that more than 30 percent of videos in survey respondents corporate libraries were illegal copies, and more than 75 percent of printed training materials in those same libraries were illegally copied. (Survey responses were anonymous.) And TMA6 director Bob Gehrke says the problem may have worsened in the six years since the study. A typical copyright violator, Gehrke believes, is someone who thinks he can be a hero by saving his company some money, especially if faced with a tight budget.anonymous (889 words)

53 thanks to owing toowing to Examples Thanks to your help we finally won the game.Thanks to your help we finally won the game. Thanks to her good fortune she brought here we finished the impossible mission.Thanks to her good fortune she brought here we finished the impossible mission.

54 end up v. to finish; finally beto finish; finally be Examples If you continue to steal, you will end up in prison.If you continue to steal, you will end up in prison.

55 trample on v. to beat down with the feet; to tread heavily or destructivelyto beat down with the feet; to tread heavily or destructively Examples Dont trample on the flowers when you play in the garden.Dont trample on the flowers when you play in the garden. Never trample on the feelings of those about you.Never trample on the feelings of those about you.

56 witness v. be present at and see; given evidence (witness to sth. / doing sth.)be present at and see; given evidence (witness to sth. / doing sth.) Examples The old lady was shocked dumb when she witnessed a murder.The old lady was shocked dumb when she witnessed a murder. Mr. Mike witnessed to having seen the accused near the scene of the crime.Mr. Mike witnessed to having seen the accused near the scene of the crime.

57 Never once did I hear the word copyright spoken This is an inverted sentence. The natural word-order of the sentence is I never heard the word copyright spoken.

58 give sth/sb short shrift v. to neglect; to look down on; to ignoreto neglect; to look down on; to ignore Examples The servants gave the old man short shrift for his shabby coat.The servants gave the old man short shrift for his shabby coat.

59 what are the chances that they'll even find out? chance n. possibility possibility Examples What are the chances that we shall succeed?What are the chances that we shall succeed? The chances are a hundred to one against you.The chances are a hundred to one against you. More to learn More to learn

60 what are the chances that theyll even find out? Its likely that they will even find out?

61 stepped up activity to v. to take action to (do)to take action to (do) Examples We should step up activity to clean all illegal editions from the market.We should step up activity to clean all illegal editions from the market.

62 ASCAP and BMI, two organizations that license the right to play copyrighted music in public settings (including most business-presentation scenarios) have reportedly added large conference centers and hotels to the list of sites they patrol to ensure that those using even small selections of pre-recorded music in presentations are properly licensed to do so ASCAP and BMI are two organizations which license the right to play copyrighted music in public settings (including most business-presentation scenarios), and they have reportedly added large conference centers and hotels to the list of sites where they patrol so as to ensure that those using even small selections of pre-recorded music in presentations are properly licensed to do so.

63 Although many cases of abuse undoubtedly are small or accidental busy presenters who in good faith give full attribution but dont seek permission; others who are unaware of public performance rights or who stretch the fair-use doctrine to its limits interviews and research conducted for this article indicate a serious lack of knowledge about copyright law among frequent presenters. in good faith honestly, sincerely honestly, sincerely Examples Although he was a General, he accepted the suggestion from a soldier in good faith.Although he was a General, he accepted the suggestion from a soldier in good faith. More to learn More to learn

64 Although many cases of abuse undoubtedly are small or accidental busy presenters who in good faith give full attribution but dont seek permission; others who are unaware of public performance rights or who stretch the fair-use doctrine to its limits interviews and research conducted for this article indicate a serious lack of knowledge about copyright law among frequent presenters. Although many cases of abuse undoubtedly are small or accidental, interviews and research conducted for this article indicate a serious lack of knowledge about copyright law among frequent presenters.

65 anonymous a. having an unknown or unacknowledged namehaving an unknown or unacknowledged name Examples He received an anonymous phone call that threatened to kill him.He received an anonymous phone call that threatened to kill him.


Download ppt "Return to Menu Return to Menu Passage A Passage A Passage B Passage B."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google