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Assistive Technology in Emergency Planning, Response and Recovery George Heake Disaster Management and Response Coordinator for: – Institute.

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Presentation on theme: "Assistive Technology in Emergency Planning, Response and Recovery George Heake Disaster Management and Response Coordinator for: – Institute."— Presentation transcript:

1 Assistive Technology in Emergency Planning, Response and Recovery George Heake Disaster Management and Response Coordinator for: – Institute on Disabilities, Pennsylvania’s Initiative on Assistive Technology(PIAT) Temple University – Pass It On Center National Resource Center – Association of Assistive Technology Act Programs 1

2 Let us set the stage! What is Emergency Management? 2

3 3 The key parts of emergency management are: Preparedness Response Recovery Mitigation

4 Let us set the stage! What is Emergency Management? 4 The key parts of emergency management are: Preparedness is simply preparing for an emergency before it occurs. Obviously, it is important to not just plan, but to prepare as well. The key to effective emergency management is being ready to provide a rapid emergency response.

5 Let us set the stage! What is Emergency Management? 5 The key parts of emergency management are: Response includes the action of responding to an emergency. Trained and equipped personnel will be required to deal with any emergency situation.

6 Let us set the stage! What is Emergency Management? 6 The key parts of emergency management are: Recovery is the process of returning to normal. Salvage, resumption of business processes, and repair are typical recovery tasks.

7 Let us set the stage! What is Emergency Management? 7 The key parts of emergency management are: Mitigation is defined as "sustained action that reduces or eliminates long-term risk to people and property from natural hazards and their effects." Mitigation is the ongoing effort to lessen the impact disasters may have on people and property. Mitigation involves such activities as avoiding construction in high-risk areas such as floodplains, engineering buildings to withstand wind and earthquakes, and more.

8 The Scaffold for Emergency Management 8

9 The power of One! The community Framework! 9

10 10 National Response Framework

11 Topics NRF purpose, key concepts Focused on response How the Framework is organized What has changed Applying the NRF Leadership and the NRF (stakeholder responsibilities for Federal, State, Local, Private Sector, Nongovernmental Organizations) Building new capability Roll out plan 11

12 12 National Response Framework Purpose – Guides how the nation conducts all-hazards incident response Key Concepts – Builds on the National Incident Management System (NIMS) with its flexible, scalable, and adaptable coordinating structures – Aligns key roles and responsibilities across jurisdictions – Links all levels of government (local, tribal, State, Federal), private sector, and nongovernmental organizations in a unified approach to emergency management – Always in effect: can be partially or fully implemented – Coordinates Federal assistance without need for formal trigger

13 13 Focused on Response Achieving a Goal Within a Broader Strategy Response – Immediate actions to save lives, protect property and the environment, and meet basic human needs – Execution of emergency plans and actions to support short-term recovery National Strategy for Homeland Security – guides, organizes and unifies our National homeland security efforts – Prevent and disrupt terrorist attacks; – Protect the American people, our critical infrastructure, and key resources; – Respond to and recover from incidents that do occur; and – Continue to strengthen the foundation to ensure our long- term success.

14 How the Framework is Organized Core Document Doctrine, organization, roles and responsibilities, response actions and planning requirements that guide national response Emergency Support Function Annexes Mechanisms to group and provide Federal resources and capabilities to support State and local responders Support Annexes Essential supporting aspects of the Federal response common to all incidents Incident Annexes Incident-specific applications of the Framework Partner Guides Next level of detail in response actions tailored to the actionable entity 14

15 15 What Has Changed  A Framework … not a Plan  Written for two audiences  Senior elected and appointed officials  Emergency Management practitioners  Emphasizes roles of the local and tribal governments, States, NGOs, individuals and the private sector  Establishes Response Doctrine Engaged partnership Tiered response Scalable, flexible, and adaptable operational capabilities Unity of effort through unified command Readiness to act  Establishes planning as a critical element of effective response

16 Applying the Framework Most incidents wholly managed locally – Some require additional support – Small number require Federal support – Catastrophic requires significant Federal support – State Governor must request Federal support Minor event might be initial phase of larger, rapidly growing threat – Accelerate assessment and response – Federal department/agency, acting on own authority, may be initial Federal responder – Integrated, systematic Federal response intended to occur seamlessly 16

17 17 State & Local Leadership and the Framework NRF State & Tribal Governments Local Governments Federal Government Private Sector & NGO Effective, unified national response requires layered, mutually supporting capabilities  Local officials have primary responsibility for community preparedness and response  Elected/Appointed Officials (Mayor)  Emergency Manager  Public Safety Officials  Individuals and Households are key starting points for emergency preparedness and support community efforts  States are sovereign entities, and the Governor has responsibility for public safety and welfare; States are the main players in coordinating resources and capabilities and obtaining support from other States and the Federal government  Governor  Homeland Security Advisor  Director State Emergency Management Agency  State Coordinating Officer

18 NGO Contributions Examples Training and managing volunteer resources Identifying shelter locations and needed supplies Providing critical emergency services to those in need, such as cleaning supplies, clothing, food and shelter, or assistance with post-emergency cleanup Identifying those whose needs have not been met and helping coordinate the provision of assistance 12

19 The Framework: Building New Capability Preparedness Cycle–a system that builds the right capabilities – Introduces National Planning System – Defines response organization – Requires training – Advocates interoperability and typing of equipment – Emphasizes exercising with broad-based participation – Describes process for continuous evaluation and improvement Aligning Risk-Based Planning – National Planning Scenarios – Hazard Identification and Risk Analysis 19 Plan Organize, Train & Equip Exercise Evaluate & Improve Capability Building

20 National AT Re-use Survey! 20

21 National AT Re-use Survey! 21

22 National AT Re-use Survey! 22

23 National AT Re-use Survey! 23

24 National AT Re-use Survey! 24

25 National AT Re-use Survey! 25

26 National AT Re-use Survey! 26

27 What is next? Haiti Disability Relief Update Twitter: haiti_disabi portlight.org Whirlwind Wheelchair Internationahaiti_disabi 27

28 28 A big ripple in a big pond……..


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