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Gifted and Talented Update Cate Reed, Executive Director of Student Services Allison McCarthy, Gifted and Talented Coordinator EFA Parent Meeting March.

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Presentation on theme: "Gifted and Talented Update Cate Reed, Executive Director of Student Services Allison McCarthy, Gifted and Talented Coordinator EFA Parent Meeting March."— Presentation transcript:

1 Gifted and Talented Update Cate Reed, Executive Director of Student Services Allison McCarthy, Gifted and Talented Coordinator EFA Parent Meeting March 25th, 2011

2 Gifted and Talented Topics Remarks from Dr. Lane Gifted Pilot Gifted Center Updates Talent Development Initiative Advanced Placement Updates and Information Questions and Feedback Gifted and Talented 1

3 Gifted and Talented Pilot Goals Gifted and Talented Office GoalsStatus Create an onsite, home school gifted model to fulfill GIEP’s of currently identified students Total School Cluster Grouping Model running at all 5 Pilot schools To identify a greater number of students in typically underrepresented populations 136 additional students have been identified as gifted 51% African American (district average gifted students: 20%) 74% FRL (district average gifted students: 27%) To analyze the student achievement and satisfaction results of such a model as it compares to a pull out gifted “center” model High teacher satisfaction rating High parent satisfaction rating Promising Achievement Category data Positive Purdue data Pilot Schools: Colfax K-8 ALA, Northview K-6 ALA, Fort Pitt K-5 ALA, Dilworth K-5, Grandview K-5 2

4 Identification & Gifted and Talented Office School Students Recommended for Evaluation Students Identified as Gifted African American Students Colfax Dilworth Ft. Pitt4010 Grandview Northview Other (attending non-pilot schools) Total (years 1&2) 269 (total) 220 FRL (82%) 136 (50%) 70 (51%) 101 FRL (74%) We have increased identification among typically underrepresented students 3

5 ____ District 56% African American Initial Pilot Results by Race and F/R Lunch Gifted and Talented Office 4

6 Pilot Recap: The Total School Cluster Grouping Model Gifted and Talented Office Whole school approach to student placement Students are “cluster grouped” by achievement level Minimizes the range of abilities in each class so teachers are better able to differentiate, but does not result in one achievement group per class Gifted resource teachers at each school, enrichment pull- out model (~2 per periods per week), push in University partner Marcia Gentry—ongoing professional development for teachers Allows more students to shine among their peers 5

7 The Total School Cluster Grouping Model (TSCG) Traditional ApproachCluster Approach Students assigned to classes heterogeneously so that there are groups with all five academic levels High Achieving Above Average Average Low Average Low Kids still assigned heterogeneously but now so that there only 3 levels within a room, and the range for teaching is smaller (no HA and L in same room, or HA and AA in same room) Kids are now “clustered” with at least a group of academic peers Round Students—Regular ClassroomRound Students—TSCG Model Round Students—Regular ClassroomRound Students—TSCG Model 6

8 Pilot Recap: Timeline Gifted and Talented Office YearFocus Train Gifted Resource teachers, identify university partner (Purdue University, Marcia Gentry) Train classroom teachers, implement Total School Cluster Grouping Model, collect data Continue to implement Total School Cluster Grouping Model, train teachers, collect data Year 3 of implementation of Gifted Pilot, with Colfax students in grades 6-8 returning to the Gifted Center, assess student achievement data Upcoming: - Students will be cluster grouped again in May/June - More of a focus around push-in next year 7

9 Gifted Pilot: Next Steps Continue to implement model with fidelity at our 5 pilot schools Continue to assess student achievement data (should have Purdue year 2 evaluation next October) Based on student data and what is best for students while taking into account budget implications, we will make a decision about the continuation of doing on-site services. Gifted and Talented 8

10 Pittsburgh Gifted Center: Examples of New and Exciting Courses Grades K-4 Biomes of the World : First and second grade students are introduced to the biomes of the world through research, museum artifacts, multimedia presentations and interdisciplinary hands on activities. The class concluded with a family night and showcase of our 3-D rainforest, desert, grassland and tundra displays. Grades 5-6 Animation: This class introduces the concepts and principles of stop- motion animation through hands-on activities using Honestech’s “Claymation Studio” software. Students create a variety of animated shows based on their interests. Grades 7-8 CAS/AP Prep: This course teaches students the skills they will need to be successful in advanced courses in high school. The course is offered for students in both math and humanities, and all students complete a Long Term Project (LTP). Gifted and Talented 9

11 Talent Development Initiative Expanded access to the Centers for Advanced Study (CAS) program Improvement to the quality of the program for our highest achieving secondary students Teacher training Curriculum development Greater student diversity Gifted and Talented No child should be denied access to a class that is appropriately challenging and rigorous, in which they can be successful. 10

12 Talent Development Initiative We propose implementation of a Talent Development Initiative at Brashear, Perry and Langley in the School Year. Gifted and Talented Students will have two ways to access CAS courses : Be identified as gifted Demonstrate high achievement through meeting rigorous course requirements for a specific content area (Math, English, Science, Social Studies, World Language) 11

13 Not a One Size Fits All Model: This program may not look exactly the same at all of our high schools, as they have varying needs. Next year, at Brashear, Perry and Langley: Gifted and Talented Grade LevelCourses for Gifted, HA Students 9 th and 10 th Grade CAS Courses in English, Math, Social Studies, Science, World Language (courses based on numbers of qualifying students) 11 th and 12 th Grade AP Courses in English, Math, Social Studies, Science, World Language (courses based on numbers of qualifying students) This is a reduction of only 3 CAS classes at the 11 th and 12 th grades at Brashear HS. They will still offer CAS Elementary Functions and Physics II. Schools will increase the numbers of AP classes at these levels based on qualified students and interest. 12

14 What we believe will happen as a result: We will increase access and improve the quality of the CAS program High performing and gifted students will have the opportunity to enroll in appropriately rigorous and accelerated classes through the CAS curriculum. The CAS program will exist for high achieving students at more of our high schools Gifted and Talented 13

15 An Example: Gifted and Talented David, a 6 th grader, is an excellent student with advanced grades and test scores and a high-level thinking ability, especially in math. His math teachers approach his parents about having him evaluated for gifted services. David does not do well on the evaluation, or his parents do not choose to get him tested, and he is not identified as gifted. CURRENT SYSTEM In high school, David is not able to enroll in CAS math classes, and struggles to remain engaged in courses that do not challenge him. CURRENT SYSTEM In high school, David is not able to enroll in CAS math classes, and struggles to remain engaged in courses that do not challenge him. TALENT DEVELOPMENT INITIATIVE In high school, David is able to meet specific requirements that enable him to take the most rigorous math classes, and is appropriately challenged. TALENT DEVELOPMENT INITIATIVE In high school, David is able to meet specific requirements that enable him to take the most rigorous math classes, and is appropriately challenged. 14

16 Addressing Advanced Students: Gifted and Talented It is critical that we place students in courses that are appropriate to their level of learning. Currently, CAS classes are our highest level courses, and only students that meet gifted requirements are able to access them. Students not identified as gifted that have demonstrated they are able to do the work should have access, regardless of gifted status. 15

17 Program Development and Evaluation: Gifted and Talented We propose implementing the Talent Development Initiative during the school year at 3 schools of varying sizes so that we are able to determine the effectiveness of the program before implementing district- wide for the school year. A team consisting of principals, Gifted and Talented office members, teachers, CAS facilitators and members from the Curriculum, Instruction and Professional Development (CIPD) office will be developed at each of the schools to oversee implementation of the model and to ensure that classes maintain rigor. We will be collaborating with CIPD to create opportunities for teachers to become better trained on the curricula and pedagogy. We will work to evaluate the program to understand if we are meeting our goals. Potential measurements include: student achievement, grades, 4sight, PSSA Scores, PSAT, teacher and student feedback (survey, anecdotal information), parent feedback 16

18 Next Steps: Gifted and Talented We will: Continue to work with our Advisory group, which is made up of Asst. Superintendants, Principals, CAS facilitators and teachers and other PPS personnel to plan implementation of the model Attend Parent School Community Council (PSCC) meetings and community group meetings to connect with parents and other stakeholders Keep the board updated on progress and outcomes 17

19 Advanced Placement (AP) Update Gifted and Talented School Based Meetings: The GT office has been meeting with counselors, principals and AP Champions at all our high schools to promote awareness, gather support for the program, and create goals around AP program enrollment. Student Focus Groups: We have been running focus groups with students from each high school to get a better understanding of how students perceive the AP program, and get additional feedback and ideas regarding our specific programming. AP Teacher Trainings: AP teachers from schools across the district have come together for two of three half-day trainings meant to give teachers an opportunity to collaborate, share best practices, and deepen their content knowledge. 18

20 Advanced Placement (AP) Update Gifted and Talented Advanced Placement Review Sessions: 12 AP Review Sessions will be held throughout March and April at CAPA and Sci-Tech to help prepare students for AP exams in May. The program is fully staffed by PPS AP teachers. Enrollment is open to any students that plan to take an AP exam in May. Advanced Placement Summer Academy: This free program is meant to help prepare students that will be taking AP classes in the school year. It will be held for three weeks at the University of Pittsburgh. The program is fully staffed by PPS AP teachers, and is open to all students enrolled in an AP course for the school year. We will send out enrollment information in mid-April. Please also stay tuned to our website which will also reflect the most up to date information.www.pps.k12.pa.us/AdvancedPlacement 19

21 Questions and Feedback Gifted and Talented 20


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