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2011 HMIS CONVERSION INSTRUCTIONS. GETTING STARTED From the DFD/FPD Website:

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Presentation on theme: "2011 HMIS CONVERSION INSTRUCTIONS. GETTING STARTED From the DFD/FPD Website:"— Presentation transcript:

1 2011 HMIS CONVERSION INSTRUCTIONS

2 GETTING STARTED From the DFD/FPD Website: sMaterialsHMIS/tabid/437034/Default.aspx sMaterialsHMIS/tabid/437034/Default.aspx Download the Conversion Workbook (note the number in the file name changes with revision and will possibly be different than the example below): HazMat_Inventory_Statement_Conversion_ _DFD.xlsx HazMat_Inventory_Statement_Conversion_ _DFD.xlsx Download the 2011 Version of the HazMat Inventory Statement (HMIS) Workbook (note the number in the file name changes with revision and will possibly be different than the example below): (HazMat_Inventory_Statement_ _DFD.xlsx)HazMat_Inventory_Statement_ _DFD.xlsx

3 GETTING READY Anywhere 2007 Excel is identified in these instructions, a newer version may be used (e.g., 2010 Excel) If you have 2007 in addition to an older version of Excel on your computer, be sure the older version is not open Initiate 2007 MS Excel on your Computer Use the ‘Open’ Command in MS Excel 2007 to open your existing (pre-2011) HMIS Use the ‘Open’ Command in MS Excel 2007 to open the Conversion Workbook you just downloaded

4 GETTING READY There are two worksheets in the conversion workbook identified by tabs at the bottom of the window The worksheets are named: “HMIS Prior to 2011” and “HMIS 2011” Occasionally on some computers the tabs do not appear when the file is opened. If this occurs, the following is suggested: –under the View tab menu group, click on ‘Arrange All’ –select ‘Tiled’ from the dropdown list –click ‘OK’

5 CONVERTING Copy In your existing (pre-2011) HMIS, highlight from Cell B6 (upper left side of the worksheet not including ‘Line Numbers’) across all columns to Cell II 6 (double I ’s – upper right side of the worksheet), then down to include all rows of pertinent data Note if you do not want to carry over blank rows, highlight down to the row above the first blank row Execute a command (right click the mouse and pick from menu, click on ‘Copy’ in the upper right menu on the ‘Home’ Tab, ‘c’, etc.)

6 CONVERTING CONT. Paste Special - Values In the Conversion Workbook, highlight Cell B6 on the worksheet ‘HMIS Prior to 2011’ (just to the right of the first yellow column) – ! ! ! DO NOT PASTE ! ! ! Executing a blanket ‘Paste’ too often seems to disrupt the formatting and corrupts the data from being converted cleanly Pull down the ‘Paste’ Drop-down menu (upper left corner on the ‘Home’ page) and execute ‘Paste Special’ then ‘Paste Values’ IF when you pull down the ‘Paste’ menu the ‘Paste Special” option is not offered, you will need to execute an intermediate step (see slide below titled “Intermediate Step”)

7 CONVERTING CONT. Removing Blank Rows If you are trying to eliminate the blank rows from your pre-2011 HMIS, make the pre-2011 HMIS window active and highlight from column 6 to column II on the next non-blank row below the first set of data you copied above Highlight all the rows with pertinent data (down to the next blank row) and follow the steps outlined above to ‘Copy’ and ‘Paste Special’ in the Conversion Workbook Be sure to past values starting in column B and in the row beneath the previously pasted set of data in the Conversion Workbook

8 CONVERSION CONT. Intermediate Step Sometimes Excel does not seem to recognize individual data from the 2003 Workbooks to permit a ‘Paste Special’ command If the ‘Paste Special’ command is not offered, a ‘New’ Workbook has to be created, and the data pasted and copied from there Under the ‘Office button (the circle in the extreme upper left corner of the 2007 Excel window), execute the ‘New’ command – then ‘Create’ on the lower right corner of the subsequent dialogue box In your existing (pre-2011) HMIS, highlight from Cell B6 (upper left side of the worksheet not including ‘Line Numbers’) across all columns to Cell II6 (double I’s – upper right side of the worksheet), then down to include all rows of pertinent data

9 CONVERSION CONT. Intermediate Step Highlight the A1 cell in the new Workbook and execute a ‘Paste’ (right click the mouse and pick from menu, click on ‘Paste’ in the upper right menu on the ‘Home’ Tab, ‘v’, etc.) Highlight the data just pasted into the ‘new’ workbook and execute a copy command In the Conversion Workbook, highlight Cell B6 (just to the right of the first yellow column) ! ! ! DO NOT PASTE ! ! ! Pull down the ‘Paste’ Drop-down menu (upper left corner on the ‘Home’ page) and execute ‘Paste Special’ then ‘Paste Values’

10 CONVERSION CONT. Once all of the data has been pasted into the Conversion Workbook on the worksheet ‘HMIS Prior to 2011’, close the pre-2011 HMIS ! ! ! DO NOT SAVE CHANGES ! ! ! in case there’s a problem later Use the ‘Open’ Command in MS Excel 2007 to open the 2011 Version of the HMIS Workbook you downloaded Make the window with the Conversion Workbook active and activate the second worksheet tab (titled ‘HMIS 2011’) Highlight and copy the data from cell B3 to O3, and down to include all rows of pertinent data Activate the window with the new HMIS workbook, and the worksheet tab titled ‘HMIS’ Highlight cell B3 and execute ‘Paste Special’ then ‘Values’

11 CONVERSION CONT. Make the window with the Conversion Workbook active and activate the second worksheet tab (titled ‘HMIS 2011’) Highlight and copy the data from cell T3 to AS3, and down to include all rows of pertinent data Activate the window with the new HMIS workbook, and the worksheet tab titled ‘HMIS’ Highlight cell T3 and execute ‘Paste Special’ then ‘Values’ Close the Conversion Workbook (it’s recommended it be saved under a new name so it, along with the downloaded version, will be available) Save the new HMIS workbook with a name that makes sense to you

12 CLEAN UP There are several new columns in the new HMIS included to better quantify the characteristics and conditions regulated in the International Fire Code (IFC) Update the data in these columns as necessary per the following: -Outdoor / Indoor (Sprinkler) This will default to In-N (indoor, non-sprinklered) unless ‘Out’ was identified in your pre-2011 HMIS (flammable/combustible liquids only). Select In-S if the control area or hazardous occupancy housing the respective material is located inside a fully sprinklered building. Select In-N if the control area or hazardous occupancy housing the respective material is located inside a partially, or non-sprinklered building. Select Out if the control area or hazardous occupancy housing the respective material is located outdoors. -Floor Identify the building level on which the control area or hazardous occupancy housing the respective material is located. IFC Section contains the regulations with respect to the number of control areas per floor. -Control Area ID / Hazardous Occupancy ID User-defined identifier for the control area or the hazardous occupancy where the respective material is located; e.g., C1 for Control Area 1, or H2W for Hazardous Occupancy (Group 2) area on the west side of the building. These ID’s must be consistent with the labeling on the graphics, Control_Areas and Haz_Occ_Areas Info forms.

13 CLEAN UP -Manufacturer Name Identify the manufacturer of the respective material. -Product Name / Chemical Name This is not a new column but a new drop-down feature has been added. Clicking on a cell in this column offers a drop-down selection of common materials. If your material is on the list and you select it, the drop-down choices across the remainder of the row will be limited to those specific to that material. Specific user information (e.g., quantities) still have to be inserted. -State The physical state of the respective material: Gas, Solid, Liquid (note ‘Liquid’, ‘Cryogenic Fluid’, and ‘Liquefied Gas’ are regulated as different states). Based on the type of hazards and units identified in your pre-2011 HMIS for each material, this field was probably automatically populated. Verify the state for each material and where incorrect or incomplete, select the physical state from the dropdown list. -Container Type Select the type of container housing the respective material from the dropdown list. This data mostly applies for flammable and combustible liquids. Leave blank if none of the selections apply. BnB== Bag in Box IBC== intermediate bulk CTN (subset of PT) Comp== composite (usu metal/concrete or metal/plastic) CTN== Container Plas== Plastic PT== Portable Tank ST== Stationary Tank

14 CLEAN UP -Container Size Identify the size of container(s) in the same ‘Units’ used to quantify the respective material. Quantities in identically-sized containers in the same Control/Hazardous Occupancy Area may be aggregated together (e.g., all 1 gallon cans of the same material in control area A may be added together). Different container sizes should be listed on separate lines – even if the same material in the same area. -Amount in Use (this is a general description, not a column heading in the Workbook) Only ‘Amount in Use’ and ‘Total Amount’ were quantified in the pre-2011 HMIS (the difference presumed to be the amount in storage). The IFC distinguishes the ‘Amount in Use’ as either being in a "Closed System" or in an “Open System”. -Amount in Use Closed System This quantity has to be manually entered (as applicable). “Open System" is defined in 2006 IFC Chapter 2 (also see Tables [1-4]) -Amount in Use Open System This quantity has to be manually entered (as applicable). “Open System" is defined in 2006 IFC Chapter 2 (also see Tables [1-4]) -Amount in Storage This quantity was calculated in the new HMIS as the difference between ‘Total Amount’ and ‘Amount in Use’ in the pre-2011 HMIS. Verify and adjust as necessary. “Storage" is defined in 2006 IFC Section 2702 (also see Tables [1-4])

15 CLEAN UP –Amount of "Amount in Storage" stored in Approved Cabinets This is a subset of "Amount in Storage" and is not added to ‘Amount Total’. This quantity is used in the IFC to ascertain compliant maximum allowable quantities (MAQs) See Footnotes e and f under 2006IFC Tables (1) and (2), respectively. –IFC Classification This is not a new column but an error tracking flag has been added to the top cell (S1). If after the previous clean up steps have been performed, the text string “ERR= “ is contained in cell S1, then an error was flagged on the line identified by ‘Line #’. Errors are usually flagged for: incompatible units and states (e.g., cu ft associated with a liquid; gallons with a compressed gas; etc.), Incompatible hazards and states (e.g., LPG identified as a solid; combustible fiber identified as a liquid, etc.), and incompatible hazards (e.g., a liquid identified as both flammable and combustible; an organic peroxide identified as an aerosol; etc.). The ERR flag is sequential in that when the first occurrence has been cleared, the next will be identified until all have been addressed. –Aerosol ‘V’ented and ‘N’on’V’ented and ‘1’ was added for “Aerosol 1’s”

16 CLEAN UP –Ammunition This is a new hazard category with subcategories of Small Arms and Large Arms and units of ‘cartridges’ Small Arms are defined as any cartridge for propellant-actuated devices including shotgun, rifle, or pistol cartridges Large Arms are typically associated with military ammunition containing bursting charges or incendiary, trace, spotting, or pyrotechnic properties –Combustible Fiber This is a new hazard category with subcategories of ‘Loose’ and ‘Baled’ Combustible Fiber is defined as readily ignitable and free-burning materials in a fibrous or shredded form such as cocoa fiber, cloth, cotton (does not include densely packed baled cotton), excelsior, hay, hemp, henequen, istle, jute, kapok, oakum, rags, sisal, Spanish moss, straw, tow, wastepaper, certain synthetic fibers or other like materials. –Combustible Liquid Combustible 3B liquids are now permitted to be identified as ‘solid’ and quantified in pounds to accommodate materials like shortening –Explosives This is not a new hazard category but the classes of explosives have been added so the generic ‘x’ used in the pre-2011 version of the HMIS worksheet could not be carried over (see 2006 IFC Tables , 1 thru 4)

17 CLEAN UP –Inert / Simple Asphyxiant This is not a new hazard category but in the pre-2011 HMIS worksheet could only accommodate compressed gases. The new version accommodates cryogenic inert materials. –Organic Peroxide This is not a new hazard category but Class 5 has been added. –Biohazard This is a new hazard category Biohazard is defined as an infectious agent or hazardous biological material that presents a risk or potential risk to the health of humans, animals, or the environment. The risk can be direct through infection or indirect through damage to the environment. Biohazardous materials include certain types of recombinant DNA; organisms and viruses infectious to humans, animals, or plants (e.g., parasites, viruses, bacteria, fungi, prions, rickettsia); and biologically active agents (i.e., toxins, allergens, venoms) that may cause disease in other living organisms or cause significant impact on the environment or community. –NFPA 704 Special Hazard In the pre-2011 version, this column included entries for organic peroxides, water-reactives, corrosives, radioactives, and oxidizers. NFPA 704 limits the list to water-reactives, oxidizers, combination water- reactive/oxidizers, and simple asphyxiants.


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