Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

TRAUMA-INFORMED CARE: Empowering students to excel by meeting their needs holistically ABE Summer Institute August 21, 2014 Rachel Johnson, Education Program.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "TRAUMA-INFORMED CARE: Empowering students to excel by meeting their needs holistically ABE Summer Institute August 21, 2014 Rachel Johnson, Education Program."— Presentation transcript:

1 TRAUMA-INFORMED CARE: Empowering students to excel by meeting their needs holistically ABE Summer Institute August 21, 2014 Rachel Johnson, Education Program Manager Stephanie Spandl, Social Services Program Manager

2 HOW WE DEFINE OURSELVES TODAY: MORE is a multicultural community-based organization, and our mission is to empower people of many races, cultures, and ethnic backgrounds to live and work in peace.

3 HOW WE GOT THERE:  Founded in the mid-1980s  McDonough Homes Public Housing Site, St. Paul  Sister Kathleen Spencer, SSND  Approach: Being with people in community rather than imposing programs

4 MORE’S NAME: A self-initiated women’s support group stated that they collectively needed:  more dignity  more opportunities  more jobs  more money  more self-respect

5 ACCOMPLISHING OUR MISSION: MORE’s programs offer community members an opportunity to: Empower themselves to increase their capacity to meet the needs of their families and to take an active role in their community

6 ACCOMPLISHING OUR MISSION: Three major component program areas support meeting our mission:  Basic Needs  Education  Social Services / Mental Health

7 WHY MORE? "MORE is uniquely situated as an organization serving refugees in that, in addition to the excellent work offered by its well-trained and dedicated staff members and volunteers, it has effectively eliminated two key barriers between providers and users of services. Those barriers are ones of accessibility and trust. MORE is physically located in communities of need and it has a well-established and solid reputation among those communities." (Licensed Social Worker/Manager at the Center for Victims of Torture in a Letter of Support for MORE.)

8 WHY TRAUMA-INFORMED CARE? In the general population, 61% of men and 51% of women reported exposure to at least one lifetime traumatic event, with the majority reporting more than one traumatic event (Kessler, et al, 1995)

9 FOUR CASE STUDIES A: Female, native speaker of English, early 40s B: Male, non-native speaker of English, late 50s C: Female, non-native speaker of English, mid 20s D: Female, native speaker of English, late 20s

10 WHAT IS TRAUMA?  “An event, series of events, or set of circumstances that is experienced by an individual as physically or emotionally harmful or threatening and that has lasting adverse effects on the individual’s functioning and physical, social emotional or spiritual well-being. (SAMHSA website, 6/2013)  “Overwhelming emotion and a feeling of utter helplessness.” (SIDRAN Institute, website, 6/2013)  Extreme stress that overwhelms the person’s capacity to cope (DSM IV-TR)

11 WHAT IS TRAUMA-INFORMED CARE?  An appreciation for the high prevalence of traumatic experiences in particular populations (i.e. refugees)  A thorough understanding of the profound neurological, biological, psychological and social effects of trauma and violence on the individual (Jennings, 2004)  A new perspective where those providing the support shift from asking “What is wrong with you?” to “What happened to you?”  A collaborative approach where healing is led by the program participant and supported by the service provider. CHOICE is key.  Impacts all aspects of an organization.

12 WHY TRAUMA INFORMED CARE?  General population trauma: 61% of men, 51% of women.  100% of refugees/asylees exposed to trauma, generally repeated and severe  Other immigrants face traumas experienced in general population as well as cultural adjustment stressors.  Undocumented immigrants face the trauma of dangerous border crossings and constant fear of deportation.  Secondary trauma to organization’s staff  We might unintentionally cause harm by practices, policies and activities that are insensitive to the needs of our clients. Re- traumatizing someone unintentionally is a real possibility.

13 TYPES OF TRAUMA  Natural Disasters  Accidents and technological disasters car/plane crashes, chemical spills, gas leak explosions, fire  Criminal Violence -- rape, robbery, homicide, assault  Domestic Violence/Child abuse and neglect  War/torture/political or religious persecution Effects of trauma are more severe if human-caused, repetitive, and/or experienced in childhood What types of trauma do you think ABE/ESL students have experienced?

14 EFFECTS OF TRAUMA SOMATIC EXPERIENCING INSTITUTE

15 Fight/Flight Freeze/dissociation All aspects of functioning change Frontal cortex turns off

16 EFFECTS OF TRAUMA  Intrusive/recurrent thoughts  Nightmares  Difficulty with sleep  Flashbacks  Distressful reminders  Emotional numbing  Feeling detached or withdrawn from people  Less interest in daily activities DSM IV-TR  Irritability  Loss of Concentration  Hyper-vigilance, feeling on guard  Exaggerated startle response/jumpy  Feeling exhausted  Body pain  Dissociation  Blaming yourself  Feeling guilty for having survived Harvard Trauma questionnaire

17 EFFECTS ON LEARNING TRAUMA CHANGES THE BRAIN  Capacity to acquire new cognitive information and retrieve stored information – learning and memory – is diminished  Trauma during brain development in childhood as well as chronic/repeated trauma in adulthood change brain patterns.  Stress response neural systems become chronically overactive and hypersensitive even when environment be relatively safe.  When afraid and hypervigilant, all non-critical info is tuned out. Perry, B. D. (Summer, 2006). Fear and Learning: Trauma-Related Factors in the Adult Education Process. New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, 110, DOI: /ace.215

18 EFFECTS ON LEARNING TRAUMA CHANGES THE BRAIN  More anxious, less capable of concentrating  More attentive to nonverbal cues such as tone of voice, body posture, and facial expressions. Such cues may be misinterpreted due to hypervigilance.  Difficulty maintaining self-esteem - may feel overwhelmed, helpless, inept, “stupid.”  Difficulty risk-taking, including classroom activities – fear inhibits curiosity and exploration.  May dissociate, “zone out” Perry, B. D. (Summer, 2006). Fear and Learning: Trauma-Related Factors in the Adult Education Process. New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, 110, DOI: /ace.215

19 FOUR CASE STUDIES A: Female, native speaker of English, early 40s B: Male, non-native speaker of English, late 50s C: Female, non-native speaker of English, mid 20s D: Female, native speaker of English, late 20s

20 WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR YOUR PROGRAM? An educator “can create safety by making the learning environment more familiar, structured, and predictable.” “Predictability is created by consistent behavior. This implies not rigidity but rather consistency of interaction.” “The invisible yet powerful web of relationships that effective educators create between themselves and learners, and between and among learners, is crucial to an optimal learning environment.” Perry, B. D. (Summer, 2006). Fear and Learning: Trauma-Related Factors in the Adult Education Process. New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, 110, DOI: /ace.215

21 WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR YOUR PROGRAM? How can educators support self regulation in the classroom? Deep breathing

22 WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR YOUR PROGRAM? Relationships What Hurts  Interactions that are humiliating, harsh, impersonal, disrespectful, critical, demanding, judgmental National Council for Community Behavioral Health Care What Helps  Interactions that express kindness, patience, reassurance, calm, acceptance and listening  Frequent use of words like “please” and “thank you”

23 WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR YOUR PROGRAM? Physical Environment What Hurts  Congested areas that are noisy  Poor signage that is confusing  Uncomfortable furniture  Separate bathrooms  Cold/non-inviting colors and décor What Helps  Areas that are comfortable and calming  Privacy when needed  Furniture is clean and comfortable  No “wrong door” philosophy. We are all here to help  Integrated bathrooms  Warm décor that displays a positive, hopeful message

24 WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR YOUR PROGRAM? Policies and Procedures What Hurts  Rules that always seem to be broken  Focus on organizational needs rather than client needs.  Documentation with minimal involvement of clients  Many hoops to go through before a participant’s needs are met.  Language and cultural barriers What Helps  Sensible & fair rules that are clearly explained (focus on what you CAN DO more than on what you CAN’T DO)  Transparency in documentation and service planning  Materials and communication in the person’s language  Continually seeking feedback from participants

25 WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR YOUR PROGRAM? Attitudes and Beliefs What Hurts  Asking questions that convey “there is something wrong with the person.”  Regarding a person’s difficulties only as symptoms of a mental health, substance use or medical problem What Helps  Asking questions for the purpose of understanding what harmful events may contribute to current problems.  Recognizing that symptoms may be a person’s way of coping with trauma or are adaptations.

26 WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR MY SCHOOL? Think about each of the categories: What changes could you make in each area to meet student needs?  Relationships  Physical Environment  Policies and Procedures  Attitudes and Beliefs

27 QUESTIONS?


Download ppt "TRAUMA-INFORMED CARE: Empowering students to excel by meeting their needs holistically ABE Summer Institute August 21, 2014 Rachel Johnson, Education Program."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google