Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

PROJECT CLARION Module IV: Scientific Investigation Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, 2009.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "PROJECT CLARION Module IV: Scientific Investigation Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, 2009."— Presentation transcript:

1 PROJECT CLARION Module IV: Scientific Investigation Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, 2009

2 Instructional Purpose – To develop an understanding of skills and habits important to a scientist. – To develop an understanding of the steps of scientific investigation. – To apply macro- concept generalizations to scientific investigations. Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, 2009

3 In the ideal science classroom: What would teachers be doing? What would students be doing? Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, 2009

4 Video What are teachers doing? What are students doing?

5 What is Scientific Inquiry? …an approach to learning that involves a process of exploring the natural or material world, and that leads to asking questions, learning more through observation, forming a hypothesis, and rigorously testing the hypothesis in the search for new understanding. Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, 2009

6 Research on Inquiry-Based Classrooms: What do they look like? Inquiry-based classrooms are ones where: * Teachers serve as facilitators in question-asking and processing to help students arrive at new understandings (Holbrook & Kolodner, 2007) – Students are actively engaged in learning science and experimenting (DeBoer, 1991) * There is student activity and engagement in the act of being a scientist – not as an onlooker but an active participant (Haury, 1993) – Students are working in groups to pose and test questions about science (Bishop & Ryan, 2007) – Students are discussing and reflecting upon their findings with teacher guidance (Holbrook & Kolodner, 2007)

7 Research on Inquiry-Based Classrooms: How Effective Are They? Promoting inquiry in a science classroom… * Enhances student performance in science when students are actively engaged and discussing content – (Mattheis & Nakayama, 1988) – Improves critical thinking – (Narode et al, 1987) – Promotes positive attitudes toward science – (Rakow, 1986) * Posits higher achievement scores on tests – (Glasson, 1989) – Improves content knowledge, process skills, collaboration, communication, and planning skills far exceed those of their peers in traditional classrooms – (Holbrook & Kolodner, 2007) * Is found to be difficult until students and teachers are trained in inquiry- based processes and continue to practice them – (Holbrook & Kolodner, 2007) Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, 2009

8 Benefits of Inquiry Encourages communication through practical action as well as through symbols. Develops language and literacy capacity. Provides direct and accurate knowledge of each childs level of science learning. Advances childrens knowledge of science, inquiry, and scientific habits of mind. Contributes to childrens social development. Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, 2009

9 Three Types of Question Models Problem-based learning – What do we know? – What do we need to know? – How do we find out? Scientific Reasoning model – What data or evidence supports your position? – What inferences do you draw from the evidence? Concept Model – How does the macro-concept (change) apply to essential understandings (understanding life cycles)? Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, 2009

10 Sample Questions for Inquiry Is it possible to… – Is it possible to clean polluted water? Comparing… – When comparing radish seeds with grass seeds, which will sprout sooner? What if… – What if we put vinegar and baking soda into a balloon? How can we… – How can we prevent erosion on our model mountain? What is… – What is the life span of a mealworm? Pearce, C. R. Nurturing Inquiry, Heinemann. Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, 2009

11 Other Sample Inquiry Questions If I had _____, how could I _____? How can I improve_____? What will happen if _____? Suppose I could _____? Pearce, C. R. Nurturing Inquiry, Heinemann Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, 2009

12 Inquiry can be spurred through observation

13 Observation Observation is fundamental to all scientific disciplines; Inquiry, hypothesis, and data collection are based on observation; Practice is required if childrens observational skills are to become increasingly more powerful, productive, and scientific; And yet, observation is an often under-valued skill in educational settings. – Eberback, C., & Crowley, K. (2009). From everyday to scientific observation: How children learn to observe the biologists world. Review of Educational Research, 79(1),

14 Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, 2009

15

16 Comparative observation

17 Observation Observation subject Characteristics (Be specific and precise) What is different? What is similar? Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, 2009

18 Question Asking with the Need to Know Board What do we know? Prior knowledge and observation What do we need to know? Questions How can we find out? Observation Research Experimental design What have we learned? Conclusion Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, 2009

19 Lower Primary Wheel of Scientific Investigation and Reasoning Javits Project Clarion, Center for Gifted Education, College of William and Mary SCIENTIFIC INVESTIGATION AND REASONING Make Observations Ask Questions Learn More Design and Conduct the Experiment Create Meaning Tell Others What Was Found SCIENTIFIC INVESTIGATION AND REASONING

20 Wheel of Scientific Investigation and Reasoning Javits Project Clarion, Center for Gifted Education, College of William and Mary Use your curiosity Find something of interest to study. Use your senses to learn. Make Observations Ask Questions Learn More Find what you need to know Find what others know. Learn more through observations. Re-examine your question. Design and Conduct the Experiment Form a hypothesis List experiment steps. Identify materials you need. Conduct experiment. Record data. Organize your data. Analyze data. Make inferences and draw conclusions. Check to see if you answered your question. Think of related questions. Select an audience. Decide on the best way to communicate. Include data tables. Report conclusions. SCIENTIFIC INVESTIGATION AND REASONING Identify all the questions you have. Select ONE question you want to answer. Create Meaning Tell Others What Was Found

21 Modeling: Questions to Hypothesis My Question…What caused the shadow to get larger or smaller? I learned more…I learned that a shadow is a dark shape made by something blocking light. I observed that the shadow of an object may change. I now think…A shadow changes when the object making the shadow is moved closer or further away from light. My prediction or hypothesis…When an object is closer to the light it creates a larger shadow than when it is further from the light. Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, 2009

22 Experiment vs. Activity An experiment is a fair test. Anything else you do is an activity. Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, 2009

23 Design and Conduct an Experiment Start with a testable question Form a hypothesis List materials and experiment steps Check that the planned experiment should prove or disprove the hypothesis Conduct experiment Carefully record data Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, 2009

24

25 Create Meaning… Organize your data. Analyze data. Make inferences and draw conclusions. Check to see if you answered your question. Think of related questions. Was your hypothesis correct? Why or why not? How could you change your hypothesis? Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, 2009

26 Data Options Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, 2009

27 Data Options Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, 2009

28 Data Options Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, 2009

29 Tell Others What You Found Select an audience. Decide on the best way to communicate. Include data tables. Report conclusions. Tell what you did. Tell what you found. Explain why the information is useful. Tell how you would change the experiment the next time. Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, 2009

30

31

32

33 REPEAT as needed Javits Project Clarion, Center for Gifted Education, College of William and Mary SCIENTIFIC INVESTIGATION AND REASONING Make Observations Ask Questions Learn More Design and Conduct the Experiment Create Meaning Tell Others What Was Found SCIENTIFIC INVESTIGATION AND REASONING

34 Center for Gifted Education College of William and Mary Scientific Investigation conclusions: Observation and Inquiry Questions to Testable Questions to Hypotheses Research and Experimentation Meaning and Sharing


Download ppt "PROJECT CLARION Module IV: Scientific Investigation Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, 2009."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google