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1 Simulator Status, FAA WJ Hughes Technical Center Completed since the April 1999, Seattle meeting : –Simulator Inlet : A 22 foot long, 22 inch diameter.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Simulator Status, FAA WJ Hughes Technical Center Completed since the April 1999, Seattle meeting : –Simulator Inlet : A 22 foot long, 22 inch diameter."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Simulator Status, FAA WJ Hughes Technical Center Completed since the April 1999, Seattle meeting : –Simulator Inlet : A 22 foot long, 22 inch diameter inlet duct has been installed to feed the blower Transducer to measure airflow installed –hot wire anemometer in duct center line –treat inlet flow as "classic" parabolic distribution and derate velocity by 10% to determine mass flow rates –calibration curve still being worked out –Air flow heating : core heating assembly installed in-line duct heaters are wired –locked out, not serviceable –incorrect part installed; replacement expected within the week On-going : –hot plates ALL hot plate materials on-site assembly for plate #1 completed this week plate #2 expected by the end of October will require testing exterior to the simulator prior to placement (control software and final assembly validation) –dry ice; looking to produce on-site Work to date : –hot-agent simulant work –developing/learning simulator procedures and behavior International Halon Replacement Working Group Ottawa, Canada 13-14October 1999 Douglas Ingerson, Federal Aviation Administration WJ Hughes Technical Center, Fire Safety Section, AAR-422 Atlantic City Int'l Airport, NJ USA

2 2 High Bypass Ratio Turbofan Simulator - Core Heating Impact on ByPass Air Flow International Halon Replacement Working Group Ottawa, Canada 13-14October 1999 Douglas Ingerson, Federal Aviation Administration WJ Hughes Technical Center, Fire Safety Section, AAR-422 Atlantic City Int'l Airport, NJ USA

3 3 HFC-125 Distribution Comparison, Simulator Environment, 30Jul99 HFC-125 Distribution Comparison, Average Distribution Comparisons, 30Jul99 International Halon Replacement Working Group Ottawa, Canada 13-14October 1999 Douglas Ingerson, Federal Aviation Administration WJ Hughes Technical Center, Fire Safety Section, AAR-422 Atlantic City Int'l Airport, NJ USA

4 4 International Halon Replacement Working Group Ottawa, Canada 13-14October 1999 Douglas Ingerson, Federal Aviation Administration WJ Hughes Technical Center, Fire Safety Section, AAR-422 Atlantic City Int'l Airport, NJ USA HFC h hot.c HFC h ambient.c Bottle volume = 600 in^3 Agent weight = 5.44 lbf Agent storage pressure = 650 psig Agent storage temp = 200 °F Air flow temp = 92°F Air flow = 4.3 lbm/s Bottle volume = 600 in^3 Agent weight = 5.44 lbf Agent storage pressure = 650 psig Agent storage temp = 200 °F Air flow temp = 215°F Air flow = 3.5 lbm/s

5 5 Simulating the Distribution of Halon 1301 in an Aircraft Engine Nacelle with HFC-125 International Halon Replacement Working Group Ottawa, Canada 13-14October 1999 Douglas Ingerson, Federal Aviation Administration WJ Hughes Technical Center, Fire Safety Section, AAR-422 Atlantic City Int'l Airport, NJ USA Actions sought to minimize the release of Halon 1301 unnecessarily DoD (U.S. Navy) sponsors work through the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to develop or discover a simulant for Halon 1301 for use in nacelle discharge testing The cumulative effort also involves Boeing, Walter Kidde Aerospace (WKA), and Shorts Brothers, PLC NIST reviewed existing material data bases for materials having : –characteristics commensurate with the application of nacelle discharge testing –characteristics comparable to Halon 1301 during discharge in this application Jakob number Saturated vapor pressure Experimental history Atmospheric lifetime (ODP and ALT) 3 candidates selected : –CHClF 2 –SF 6 –C 2 HF 5 (HFC-125, pentafluoroethane)

6 6 Simulating the Distribution of Halon 1301 in an Aircraft Engine Nacelle with HFC-125 Field Work : –NIST –USN, WKA on the F-18 –Boeing on the Pratt and Whitney PW 4084 on the B777 airframe –Shorts Brothers, PLC on the Allied Signal TFE on the IAI Astra SPX airframe Conclusions : –HFC-125 most effectively simulates a Halon 1301 discharge in these applications –US military specification Mil-E edited to reflect such procedures Additional field work, April –FAA personnel assisting USN on agent distribution within the F-18 nacelle –As courtesy to the FAA, a simulant test pair is run –Results reflect previous results –Historical review indicates overdesign far outweighs the delta found between agents in the simulation –FAA publishes technical note on the concept Qualitative discussion regarding limitations : –the simulation appears to be sensitive to the ventilation rate of the compartment; compare cargo and nacelle environments (forced vs. natural/gravitationally driven ventilation) –recent work at the FAATC indicates agent temperature likely plays a role in the simulation effectiveness International Halon Replacement Working Group Ottawa, Canada 13-14October 1999 Douglas Ingerson, Federal Aviation Administration WJ Hughes Technical Center, Fire Safety Section, AAR-422 Atlantic City Int'l Airport, NJ USA

7 7 Simulating the Distribution of Halon 1301 in an Aircraft Engine Nacelle with HFC-125 Procedures. –Agent Storage : Calculate/determine required weight of Halon 1301 for application multiply desired Halon 1301 weight by 0.77 to determine the required weight of HFC-125 for the simulation load and superpresurize with N 2 as would be done for the design Halon 1301 bottle cold soak the bottle perform test –Halonyzer operation : the analyzer is configured for HFC-125 capture the simulant test with the HFC-125 calibration curve as the analyzer reference compare results to the certification criteria of Halon 1301 determine success or failure NOTE : This procedure is not intended to provide a method to determine a weight of HFC-125 for fire suppression purposes. This process delineates a method to use HFC-125 in a manner which would reasonably simulate the discharge of Halon 1301 in an aircraft engine nacelle from a gaseous distribution perspective. International Halon Replacement Working Group Ottawa, Canada 13-14October 1999 Douglas Ingerson, Federal Aviation Administration WJ Hughes Technical Center, Fire Safety Section, AAR-422 Atlantic City Int'l Airport, NJ USA

8 8 Simulating the Distribution of Halon 1301 in an Aircraft Engine Nacelle with HFC-125 References. Kaufmann, K. J., Miller, M. P., Wozniak, G., and Mitchell, M.D., 1995, "Results of Halon 1301 and HFC-125 Concentration Tests on a Large Commercial Aircraft Engine Installation," International Halon Replacement Working Group Minutes, United States Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration, W.J. Hughes Technical Center, Atlantic City, NJ. Ingerson, D. A., "Simulating the Distribution of Halon 1301 in an Aircraft Engine Nacelle with HFC-125," DOT/FAA/AR-TN99/64, United States Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration, W.J. Hughes Technical Center, Atlantic City International Airport, NJ. Military Specification MIL-E-22285(AS), Amendment 3, 1996, "Extinguishing System, Fire, Aircraft, High-Rate-Discharge Type. Installation and Test of," United States Department of Defense, Department of the Navy, Naval Air Systems Command, Washington, D.C. Mitchell, M. D., 1994, "Methodology for Halon 1301 Simulant Testing and Concentration Equivalence Verification," Report No. R-5102, Kidde Technologies, Wilson, NC. Mitchell, M. D., 1995, "Full Scale Halon Simulant Testing of F-18D Aircraft Using Bromotrifluoromethane and Pentafluoroethane," Report No. R-5127, Kidde Technologies, Wilson, NC. Riordan, D., 1995, "Engine Fire Extinguisher Agent Concentration Testing," International Halon Replacement Working Group Minutes, United States Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration, W.J. Hughes Technical Center, Atlantic City, NJ. Womeldorf, C. A., Grosshandler, W. L., 1995, "Selection of a CF 3 Br Simulant for Use in Engine Nacelle Certification Tests," Fire Suppression System Performance of Alternative Agents in Aircraft Engine and Dry Bay Laboratory Simulations, SP890, Vol. 2, p , National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD. International Halon Replacement Working Group Ottawa, Canada 13-14October 1999 Douglas Ingerson, Federal Aviation Administration WJ Hughes Technical Center, Fire Safety Section, AAR-422 Atlantic City Int'l Airport, NJ USA

9 9 Simulating the Distribution of Halon 1301 in an Aircraft Engine Nacelle with HFC-125, Historical Example of Overdesign International Halon Replacement Working Group Ottawa, Canada 13-14October 1999 Douglas Ingerson, Federal Aviation Administration WJ Hughes Technical Center, Fire Safety Section, AAR-422 Atlantic City Int'l Airport, NJ USA Lockheed C-140 Jet Star Concentration Profile at N 1 = 78% (Sommers, 1970, p. 34)

10 10 Simulating the Distribution of Halon 1301 in an Aircraft Engine Nacelle with HFC-125, Historical Example of Overdesign International Halon Replacement Working Group Ottawa, Canada 13-14October 1999 Douglas Ingerson, Federal Aviation Administration WJ Hughes Technical Center, Fire Safety Section, AAR-422 Atlantic City Int'l Airport, NJ USA General Dynamics F/EF-111 Agent Concentration Profile for Test (Chamberlain and Boris, 1988, p.57)

11 11 Halon h c HFC h c International Halon Replacement Working Group Ottawa, Canada 13-14October 1999 Douglas Ingerson, Federal Aviation Administration WJ Hughes Technical Center, Fire Safety Section, AAR-422 Atlantic City Int'l Airport, NJ USA Bottle volume = 600 in^3 Agent weight = 7.59 lbf Agent storage pressure = 400 psig Agent storage temp = 100 °F Air flow temp = 71°F Air flow = 2.3 lbm/s Bottle volume = 600 in^3 Agent weight = 5.89 lbf Agent storage pressure = 400 psig Agent storage temp = 100 °F Air flow temp = 75°F Air flow = 2.3 lbm/s

12 12 HFC h c Halon h c International Halon Replacement Working Group Ottawa, Canada 13-14October 1999 Douglas Ingerson, Federal Aviation Administration WJ Hughes Technical Center, Fire Safety Section, AAR-422 Atlantic City Int'l Airport, NJ USA Bottle volume = 400 in^3 Agent weight = 3.54 lbf Agent storage pressure = 400 psig Agent storage temp = 100 °F Air flow temp = 72°F Air flow = 2.3 lbm/s Bottle volume = 400 in^3 Agent weight = 4.58 lbf Agent storage pressure = 400 psig Agent storage temp = 100 °F Air flow temp = 73°F Air flow = 2.3 lbm/s

13 13 Halon h a07.01.c International Halon Replacement Working Group Ottawa, Canada 13-14October 1999 Douglas Ingerson, Federal Aviation Administration WJ Hughes Technical Center, Fire Safety Section, AAR-422 Atlantic City Int'l Airport, NJ USA Bottle volume = 300 in^3 Agent weight = 4.25 lbf Agent storage pressure = 400 psig Agent storage temp = 100 °F Air flow temp = 63°F Air flow = 2.3 lbm/s HFC h a07.02.c Bottle volume = 300 in^3 Agent weight = 3.28 lbf Agent storage pressure = 400 psig Agent storage temp = 100 °F Air flow temp = 64°F Air flow = 2.3 lbm/s

14 14 Halon h a07.04.c International Halon Replacement Working Group Ottawa, Canada 13-14October 1999 Douglas Ingerson, Federal Aviation Administration WJ Hughes Technical Center, Fire Safety Section, AAR-422 Atlantic City Int'l Airport, NJ USA Bottle volume = 300 in^3 Agent weight = 4.40 lbf Agent storage pressure = 400 psig Agent storage temp = 100 °F Air flow temp = 64°F Air flow = 2.3 lbm/s HFC h a07.03.c Bottle volume = 300 in^3 Agent weight = 3.39 lbf Agent storage pressure = 400 psig Agent storage temp = 100 °F Air flow temp = 64°F Air flow = 2.3 lbm/s

15 15 HFC h a06.02.c Halon h a06.04.c International Halon Replacement Working Group Ottawa, Canada 13-14October 1999 Douglas Ingerson, Federal Aviation Administration WJ Hughes Technical Center, Fire Safety Section, AAR-422 Atlantic City Int'l Airport, NJ USA Bottle volume = 300 in^3 Agent weight = 3.08 lbf Agent storage pressure = 400 psig Agent storage temp = 100 °F Air flow temp = 70°F Air flow = 2.3 lbm/s Bottle volume = 300 in^3 Agent weight = 4.00 lbf Agent storage pressure = 400 psig Agent storage temp = 100 °F Air flow temp = 70°F Air flow = 2.3 lbm/s

16 16 HFC h a06.03.c HFC h a06.01.c International Halon Replacement Working Group Ottawa, Canada 13-14October 1999 Douglas Ingerson, Federal Aviation Administration WJ Hughes Technical Center, Fire Safety Section, AAR-422 Atlantic City Int'l Airport, NJ USA Bottle volume = 300 in^3 Agent weight = 3.08 lbf Agent storage pressure = 400 psig Agent storage temp = 100 °F Air flow temp = 70°F Air flow = 2.3 lbm/s Bottle volume = 300 in^3 Agent weight = 3.08 lbf Agent storage pressure = 400 psig Agent storage temp = 100 °F Air flow temp = 66°F Air flow = 2.3 lbm/s


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