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First Aid for Burns Click to Begin

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Presentation on theme: "First Aid for Burns Click to Begin"— Presentation transcript:

1 First Aid for Burns Click to Begin
Everyone has experienced mild burns and knows how painful they can be. Severe burns are not only painful, but may result in infection and loss of life. Treatment in such cases requires determining the severity of the burn Click to Begin

2 First Aid for Burns Click to Continue
Everyone has experienced mild burns and knows how painful they can be. Severe burns are not only painful, but may result in infection and loss of life. Treatment in such cases requires determining the severity of the burn Click to Continue

3 Burns Assessing the extent of damage to body tissues will help you determine what aid to give. First degree burn: less severe Second degree burn: More severe Third degree burn: very severe To distinguish a minor burn from a serious burn, the first step is to determine the degree and the extent of damage to body tissues. The three classifications of first-degree burn, second-degree burn and third-degree burn will help you determine emergency care Click to Continue

4 First Degree Burn Least serious burns
The outer layer of skin (epidermis) is burned. Symptoms: The skin is usually red and dry, with swelling Some pain usually present. Treat a first-degree burn as a minor burn unless it involves substantial portions of the hands, feet, face, groin or buttocks, or a major joint. The least serious burns are those in which only the outer layer of skin (epidermis) is burned. The skin is usually red, with swelling and pain sometimes present. The outer layer of skin hasn't been burned through. Treat a first-degree burn as a minor burn unless it involves substantial portions of the hands, feet, face, groin or buttocks, or a major joint. Click to Continue

5 First Aid for Minor Burns
Cool the burn! Cool the burn under cold running water, immerse in cold water, or cool it with cold compresses for 5 to10 minutes or until the pain subsides. Don't put ice on the burn. Don’t put butter or other oily lotions on the burn while it is still hot. Lotion may be applied when it has cooled. Cool the burn. Hold the burned area under cold running water for at least 5 minutes, or until the pain subsides. If this is impractical, immerse the burn in cold water or cool it with cold compresses. Cooling the burn reduces swelling by conducting heat away from the skin. Don't put ice or oily lotions on the burn, but once it has cooled, you can apply lotion to keep the area moist. Click to Continue

6 Second Degree Burn More severe: Symptoms: Blisters develop
skin red and wet, may be blotchy severe pain and swelling When the first layer of skin has been burned through and the second layer of skin (dermis) also is burned, the injury is termed a second- degree burn. Blisters develop and the skin is moist and takes on an intensely reddened, splotchy appearance. Second-degree burns produce severe pain and swelling. Click to Continue

7 Second Degree Burn First Aid
If smaller than 2 to 3 inches in diameter, treat it as a minor burn. Get immediate medical help if: The burn is larger than 2 to 3 inches the burn is on the hands, feet, face, groin or buttocks, or over a major joint Cover the burn with a sterile gauze bandage. Wrap the gauze loosely to avoid putting pressure on burned skin. If the second-degree burn is no larger than 2 to 3 inches in diameter, treat it as a minor burn. Don’t break the blisters, and, if they do break, clean the area and apply an antibiotic. If the burned area is larger or if the burn is on the hands, feet, face, groin or buttocks, or over a major joint, get medical help immediately. Click to Continue

8 Second Degree Burn First Aid
Give an over the counter pain medication Watch for signs of infection, such as increased pain, redness, fever, swelling or oozing. If infection develops, seek medical help. Use sunscreen on the area for at least a year. Watch for signs of infection, such as increased pain, redness, fever, swelling or oozing. If an infection develops, seek medical help. Avoid re- injuring or tanning if the burns are less than a year old—doing so may cause more extensive pigmentation changes. Use sunscreen on the area for at least a year. Click to Continue

9 Third Degree Burn Click to Continue
The most serious burns are painless and involve all layers of the skin. Fat, muscle and even bone may be affected. Areas may be charred black or appear dry and white. The patient may have difficulty inhaling and exhaling. Carbon monoxide poisoning or other toxic effects may occur if smoke inhalation accompanies the burn. The deepest burns are third degree burns, although some experts distinguish between third and 4th degree burns when bone and muscle are involved. The dangers of first degree burns are infection and shock, and the rescuer must be aware of both during treatment.l Click to Continue

10 First Aid for Major Burns
Dial 911 or call for emergency medical assistance. Make sure the victim is no longer in contact with smoldering materials or exposed to smoke or heat. Douse the victim with lots of cold water, but don’t immerse them in water. Doing so could cause shock. After calling 911, lay the victim down, protecting them from the ground and other debris. The first priority is to cool the injury. Delay in cooling the injury can result in more serious injury.   Begin cooling even before resuscitation, but begin CPR if needed after the cooling is started. Cooling may take as much as 10 minutes, but is crucial. Click to Continue

11 First Aid for Major Burns
Check for signs of circulation (breathing, coughing or movement). If there is no breathing or other sign of circulation, begin cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Cover the area of the burn. Use a cool, moist, sterile bandage; clean, moist cloth; or moist towels. Treat for shock. Check for circulation and begin CPR if needed. Cover the burn lightly with a moist dressing or a clean plastic bag. Remember, all severe burns carry the danger of shock, and the shock assocaited with thrid degree burns can be very severe. Treat for shock immediately. Click to Continue

12 First Aid for Major Burns
DO NOT overcool the victim. DO NOT remove clothing or anything sticking to the burn. DO NOT burst blisters. DO NOT apply lotions, ointment, or fat to the injury. DO NOT overcool the victim; this may dangerously lower the body temperature and put the victim into shock. DO NOT remove anything sticking to the burn; this may cause further damage and cause infection. Leave that to professionals. DO NOT burst blisters. This may open the body to further infection. DO NOT apply anything to the injury. This concludes the presentation


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