Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Jackson, McKinnon, and Wilson (2006) The Transition from Elementary School to Middle School Kelly Jackson Natoscha McKinnon Rebecca Wilson Johns Hopkins.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Jackson, McKinnon, and Wilson (2006) The Transition from Elementary School to Middle School Kelly Jackson Natoscha McKinnon Rebecca Wilson Johns Hopkins."— Presentation transcript:

1 Jackson, McKinnon, and Wilson (2006) The Transition from Elementary School to Middle School Kelly Jackson Natoscha McKinnon Rebecca Wilson Johns Hopkins University October 18, 2006

2 Jackson, McKinnon, and Wilson (2006) WELCOME! Please make a nametag for yourself.Please make a nametag for yourself. Please take an orange dot and rate your level of anxiety (high, medium, low or somewhere in between) about the middle school transition.Please take an orange dot and rate your level of anxiety (high, medium, low or somewhere in between) about the middle school transition. Child care is provided in Room 400.Child care is provided in Room 400. Spanish-speaking presentation tomorrow night at 7 pm.Spanish-speaking presentation tomorrow night at 7 pm.

3 Jackson, McKinnon, and Wilson (2006) Today’s Agenda Anxiety Level Pre-AssessmentAnxiety Level Pre-Assessment IntroductionIntroduction Goals/ObjectivesGoals/Objectives Icebreaker/EnergizerIcebreaker/Energizer Content:Content: –Procedural, Academic & Social/Emotional Concerns –What Parents Can Do –School’s Role –Transitional Activities Role PlaysRole Plays EvaluationEvaluation Anxiety Level Post-AssessmentAnxiety Level Post-Assessment

4 Jackson, McKinnon, and Wilson (2006) Goals/Objectives Reduce your level of anxiety about the middle school transitionReduce your level of anxiety about the middle school transition Give you information, tools and resources to make the transition successfulGive you information, tools and resources to make the transition successful Inform you about transition activitiesInform you about transition activities

5 Jackson, McKinnon, and Wilson (2006) Icebreaker/Energizer Independently read and rate the questionsIndependently read and rate the questions Please split into four groups of 2-3Please split into four groups of 2-3 Discuss and list any additional anxieties or concerns about your child’s transition to middle schoolDiscuss and list any additional anxieties or concerns about your child’s transition to middle school Share anxieties and concerns with groupShare anxieties and concerns with group

6 Jackson, McKinnon, and Wilson (2006) The Transition to Middle School It is normal for your child to be nervous about starting middle school.It is normal for your child to be nervous about starting middle school. It is also perfectly normal for you to be nervous about your child’s transition to middle school.It is also perfectly normal for you to be nervous about your child’s transition to middle school. “The transition to middle school may be one of the toughest transitions during childhood, for both parents and kids” (Brown, 2004).“The transition to middle school may be one of the toughest transitions during childhood, for both parents and kids” (Brown, 2004).

7 Jackson, McKinnon, and Wilson (2006) Procedural Concerns Getting lost or finding classesGetting lost or finding classes Finding and opening the lockerFinding and opening the locker Finding the bathroomFinding the bathroom Not knowing the school rulesNot knowing the school rules Carrying around all those booksCarrying around all those books Going from class to class without being lateGoing from class to class without being late Bringing the right materials to the right classBringing the right materials to the right class at the right time Traveling longer distances to schoolTraveling longer distances to school Eating in a larger cafeteriaEating in a larger cafeteria (Brown, 2004; Elias, 2001)

8 Jackson, McKinnon, and Wilson (2006) Procedural Concerns: What You Can Do Buy a combination lock before school and have your child spend time trying to open the lock.Buy a combination lock before school and have your child spend time trying to open the lock. Go to the school two or three days before school starts and get a copy of your child’s schedule. Take a few minutes to walk from room to room with your child.Go to the school two or three days before school starts and get a copy of your child’s schedule. Take a few minutes to walk from room to room with your child. Don’t buy backpacks that can store 50 lbs. of materials. Smaller backpacks allow for better organization.Don’t buy backpacks that can store 50 lbs. of materials. Smaller backpacks allow for better organization. (The elementary to middle school transition: Five helpful hints for parents, n.d.)

9 Jackson, McKinnon, and Wilson (2006) Academic Concerns Getting good gradesGetting good grades Competition for gradesCompetition for grades Having more than one teacherHaving more than one teacher More homeworkMore homework More long-term projectsMore long-term projects Work that is more challenging and requires more effortWork that is more challenging and requires more effort Expectations of teachers in different subject areasExpectations of teachers in different subject areas Basic tasks such as studying, taking notes, and taking testsBasic tasks such as studying, taking notes, and taking tests (Brown, 2004; Elias, 2001)

10 Jackson, McKinnon, and Wilson (2006) Academic Concerns: What You Can Do Be the example … Show the importance of educationBe the example … Show the importance of education Ask your child about their dayAsk your child about their day Set aside a quiet space and time for your child to study/complete homeworkSet aside a quiet space and time for your child to study/complete homework Balance school work and play timeBalance school work and play time Encourage readingEncourage reading Assist your child with their homework and/or check their homework dailyAssist your child with their homework and/or check their homework daily Set high but reachable expectations for your childSet high but reachable expectations for your child ENCOURAGEMENT!ENCOURAGEMENT! (Ford-Coabley, Crenshaw, DelAunter & Isaacs, 2006)

11 Jackson, McKinnon, and Wilson (2006) Social/Emotional Concerns Bullies and/or being teasedBullies and/or being teased Making new friends/Finding and connecting with a peer groupMaking new friends/Finding and connecting with a peer group Feeling stupid compared to other kidsFeeling stupid compared to other kids Success in sportsSuccess in sports PopularityPopularity Being embarrassed by parents in front of other kidsBeing embarrassed by parents in front of other kids Puberty (pimples, body changes)Puberty (pimples, body changes) Changing before and after P.E. in front of other kidsChanging before and after P.E. in front of other kids Having girlfriends and boyfriendsHaving girlfriends and boyfriends Having someone to sit with at lunchHaving someone to sit with at lunch Pressure to smoke, drink alcohol, or take drugsPressure to smoke, drink alcohol, or take drugs (Brown, 2004; Elias, 2001)

12 Jackson, McKinnon, and Wilson (2006) Social/Emotional Concerns: What You Can Do Increase your knowledge of adolescent developmentIncrease your knowledge of adolescent development Be upbeat about what lies aheadBe upbeat about what lies ahead Recognize their fearsRecognize their fears Offer supportOffer support Hold your child accountableHold your child accountable Give your child the opportunity to make decisionsGive your child the opportunity to make decisions on his/her own Pick your battlesPick your battles Give them tools they need to succeedGive them tools they need to succeed Allow them the freedom to make mistakesAllow them the freedom to make mistakes (The elementary to middle school transition: Five helpful hints for parents, n.d.; Dean, n.d.)

13 Jackson, McKinnon, and Wilson (2006) What Parent’s Can Do at SCHOOL Maintain a good working relationship with your child’s teachersMaintain a good working relationship with your child’s teachers Visit the schoolVisit the school Know and understand school rulesKnow and understand school rules Attend meetings (PTA, conferences, etc.) and child’s activitiesAttend meetings (PTA, conferences, etc.) and child’s activities Make sure your child attends school dailyMake sure your child attends school daily Volunteer in any way you canVolunteer in any way you can Make a contract with your child and/or teacher If you have raised adolescents, be willing to share advice and information with other parents (Ford-Coabley, Crenshaw, DelAunter & Isaacs, 2006; The elementary to middle school transition: Five helpful hints for parents, n.d.)

14 Jackson, McKinnon, and Wilson (2006) What Happens if Parents Get Involved Decades of research show that when parents are involved students have … Higher grades, test scores, and graduation ratesHigher grades, test scores, and graduation rates Better school attendanceBetter school attendance Increased motivationIncreased motivation Better self-esteemBetter self-esteem Lower rates of suspensionLower rates of suspension Decreased use of drugs and alcoholDecreased use of drugs and alcohol Fewer instances of violent behaviorFewer instances of violent behavior Greater enrollment rates in post-secondary educationGreater enrollment rates in post-secondary education (Ford-Coabley, Crenshaw, DelAunter & Isaacs, 2006) (Ford-Coabley, Crenshaw, DelAunter & Isaacs, 2006)

15 Jackson, McKinnon, and Wilson (2006) School’s Role Adolescents making the middle school transition need a combination of skill training and social-emotional learning (Elias, 2001)Adolescents making the middle school transition need a combination of skill training and social-emotional learning (Elias, 2001) The school provides experiences that meet essential needs in these four areas:The school provides experiences that meet essential needs in these four areas: –Contributions (Service learning) –Belonging (Peer groups, positive relationships, safe) –Talents (Academic and non-academic) –Life Skills (Learning about feelings, goal-setting, group work, problem solving and resilience) (Elias, 2001)

16 Jackson, McKinnon, and Wilson (2006) School’s Transition Program Helps students form a realistic expectation of what middle school will be likeHelps students form a realistic expectation of what middle school will be like Provides a positive and successful first impressionProvides a positive and successful first impression Insures a successful introduction to the middle school experienceInsures a successful introduction to the middle school experience (Lorain, n.d.)

17 Jackson, McKinnon, and Wilson (2006) Transition Activities Curriculum articulationCurriculum articulation Guidance counselors visit elementary schoolsGuidance counselors visit elementary schools Letters sent home welcoming students and families, and inviting to school activitiesLetters sent home welcoming students and families, and inviting to school activities Parent Teacher Association (PTA) members call each new family welcoming them to schoolParent Teacher Association (PTA) members call each new family welcoming them to school Mentor/buddy programMentor/buddy program Programs new to entering students will be highlighted during student visitationsPrograms new to entering students will be highlighted during student visitations Student orientation Open house before the first day of school Back-to-school night School handbook Monthly newsletters sent home to parents Individual and group counseling Classroom guidance lessons Parent workshops and groups (Schumacher, 1998)

18 Jackson, McKinnon, and Wilson (2006) Role Play Please break into 3 groups of 3-4 people.Please break into 3 groups of 3-4 people. Each group will receive a role play scenario.Each group will receive a role play scenario. Please discuss and role play within your group how you would address your child’s middle school anxiety/concern.Please discuss and role play within your group how you would address your child’s middle school anxiety/concern. Share your reactions with the whole group.Share your reactions with the whole group. Have Fun!Have Fun!

19 Jackson, McKinnon, and Wilson (2006) Positive Aspects of Transition Choosing classesChoosing classes Making new friendsMaking new friends Participating in sportsParticipating in sports Having lockersHaving lockers More personal and social freedomMore personal and social freedom Changing classesChanging classes ElectivesElectives Greater academic choicesGreater academic choices (Akos & Galassi, 2004)

20 Jackson, McKinnon, and Wilson (2006)References Akos, P., & Galassi, J. P. (2004, April). Middle school and high school transitions as viewed by students, parents, and teachers. ASCA: Professional School Counseling, 7(4), Brown, N. (2004). Middle school transition. Retrieved October 3, 2006, from the Palo Alto Medical Foundation Web site: Dean, L. (n.d.). Easing your child’s transition to middle school or junior high. Retrieved October 3, 2006, from the Partnership for Learning Web site: Elias, M. J. (Winter, 2001). Middle school transition: It’s harder than you think: Making the transition to middle school successful. Retrieved October 3, 2006, from the National Association of Elementary School Principals Web site: Ford-Coabley, M., Crenshaw, P., DelAunter, B., & Isaacs, S. (2006). How to get involved in your child’s learning … Powerpoint presentation. Lorain, P. (n.d.). Transition to middle school: Are swirlies for real? Retrieved October 3, 2006, from the National Education Association Web site: Schumacher, D. (1998, June). The transition to middle school. Champaign, IL: ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED422119) The elementary to middle school transition: Five helpful hints for parents. Retrieved October 3, 2006, from the National Middle School Association Web site: Hints/tabid/649/Default.aspx

21 Jackson, McKinnon, and Wilson (2006) Wrap-Up Questions?Questions? Please complete the evaluation.Please complete the evaluation. Please use a blue dot to indicate your level of anxiety after this workshop.Please use a blue dot to indicate your level of anxiety after this workshop. Please drop your evaluation in the box.Please drop your evaluation in the box. Please pick up an informational packet and brochures.Please pick up an informational packet and brochures. Thank you for attending our workshop!Thank you for attending our workshop!


Download ppt "Jackson, McKinnon, and Wilson (2006) The Transition from Elementary School to Middle School Kelly Jackson Natoscha McKinnon Rebecca Wilson Johns Hopkins."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google