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Statistics on Obesity, PA & Diet: England, Jan 08 i Compiled by Sally Cornfield on behalf of PAN-WM Headline Findings.

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Presentation on theme: "Statistics on Obesity, PA & Diet: England, Jan 08 i Compiled by Sally Cornfield on behalf of PAN-WM Headline Findings."— Presentation transcript:

1 Statistics on Obesity, PA & Diet: England, Jan 08 i Compiled by Sally Cornfield on behalf of PAN-WM Headline Findings

2 Obesity Headline Statements (Children) In % of 2-15yr olds were overweight or obese. The prevalence of overweight and obese and obese is higher in boys (30.6% & 17.3% respectively) than girls (28.7% & 14.7%) ii. This higher prevalence is also true for younger children (2-10yrs) with 29.3% of boys overweight including obese compared to 25.9% of girls & 17.1% of boys obese compared to 13.2% of girls ii. (Figure 1) Obesity is most prevalent for boys at the ages of 9yrs & 13yrs (both 23%) & for girls at 9yrs & 14yrs (both 19%). The highest prevalence of overweight for boys is at 11yrs (16%) & for girls at 14yrs (20%). For overweight including obese the highest prevalence for boys is at 9yrs, 11yrs & 13yrs (all 38%) & for girls at 14yrs (39%).

3 Figure 1 Health Survey for England The Information Centre, Available at: BoysGirls Boys 2-10 Boys Boys 2-15 Girls 2-10 Girls Girls 2-15

4 Trend data reveals that In 2006, 17.3% of boys & 14.7% of girls were obese compared to 10.9% & 12% in 1995 ii. (Figure 2) The data also shows the same overall increase among both younger children aged 2-10yrs (boys; 9.6% to 17.1% & girls; 10.3% to 13.2%) & for boys aged 11-15yrs (13.5% to 17.7%). The increase for girls (15.4% to 17%) was not statistically significant ii. (Figure 2) Although the 2006 estimate for girls aged 2-15yrs represents a significant decrease from the 2005 figure 18.3% %, it is not know whether this is part of a downward trend yet i. Future years’ data is needed ii. (Figure 2 – 2003 onwards weighted) Whilst there has been a marked increase in the prevalence of obesity, the prevalence of overweight has remained similar (despite fluctuations) i. (Figure 3) Obesity Headline Statements (Children)

5 Figure 2 Health Survey for England The Information Centre, Available at: Overweight inc Obese (2-15) Obese (2-15) Overweight (2-15) Overweight inc Obese (11-15) Obese (11-15) Overweight (11-15) Overweight inc Obese (2-10) Obese (2-10) Overweight (2-10) Overweight & obesity prevalence among children by year & gender,

6 Figure 3 Office of National Statistics (2008) Statistics on Obesity, Physical Activity & Diet: England. January, The Information Centre, Lifestyle Statistics. Available at: 2008%20final.pdf Obesity prevalence among children aged 2-15,

7 Among boys & girls a pattern can be seen between obesity and income group. Among the lowest income group 20% of both boys & girls were obese ii. In the highest income groups, 15% of boys & 9% of girls were obese ii. (Figure 4) The proportion overweight or obese varied among girls from 24% in the highest income groups to 33% in the lowest. No pattern was found among boys ii. (Figure 5). Girls in the lowest income quintile were 2.5 times more likely to be overweight (inc obese) than those in the highest quintile ii. No clear relationship could be identified for boys nor for obesity & income (boys or girls) ii. Obesity Headline Statements (Children)

8 Figure 4 Office of National Statistics (2008) Statistics on Obesity, Physical Activity & Diet: England. January, The Information Centre, Lifestyle Statistics. Available at: 2008%20final.pdf Prevalence of obesity by equivalised household income quintiles and gender, 2006

9 Figure 5 Boys Overweight Boys Overweight inc Obese Girls Overweight Girls Overweight inc Obese Health Survey for England The Information Centre, Available at:

10 Children in semi-routine & routine households were nearly twice as likely to be obese than those in managerial & professional households (boys odds ratio 1.85, girls 1.99) ii. Parental BMI is a significant predictor for girls. Where either parent or the child’s mother were either overweight or obese 22% of girls (2-15yrs) were classed as obese compared with 8% in normal households ii. (Figure 6) Equivalent figures for those classed as either overweight or obese were 37% & 16% ii. No clear relationship could be identified among boys ii. Girls living in overweight or obese households were over three times as likely to be overweight or obese than those living in normal households. Obesity Headline Statements (Children)

11 Figure 6 Prevalence of obesity by parental BMI status & gender, 2006 Office of National Statistics (2008) Statistics on Obesity, Physical Activity & Diet: England. January, The Information Centre, Lifestyle Statistics. Available at: 2008%20final.pdf

12 A relationship can be seen between overweight prevalence and physical activity levels for girls 2-15yrs. Overweight prevalence rates ranged from 18% in the low PA groups to 12% in the high PA group ii. (Figure 7) No equivalent difference was identifies for girls PA levels & obesity nor for boys in any category ii. The prevalence of boys in Scotland (2003) who were overweight including obese was significantly higher than boys in England (2002) (34.6% in Scotland iii, 30.3% in England iv ). (Figure 8) There were no significant differences between girls in England & Scotland. Obesity Headline Statements (Children)

13 Figure 7 Health Survey for England The Information Centre, Available at: Girls Boys

14 Figure 8 The Scottish Health Service Scottish Executive Health Department, 2005 Available at: Health Survey for England 2002: Department of Health, Available at: HealthSurveyForEngland/Healthsurveyresults/DH_ http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/PublishedSurvey/ HealthSurveyForEngland/Healthsurveyresults/DH_

15 Obesity prevalence varied between the different Government Office Regions. For boys in 2006 prevalence of obesity ranged from 24% in London to 14% in both the North West & East England. Among girls values ranged from 18% in the East Midlands to 10% in East England ii. (Figure 9) In the 2006 HES children ages 8-15yrs were asked “Given your age & height, would you say that you are about the right weight, too heavy or too light?. Among girls classed as obese, 2/3 believed that they were too heavy while 1/3 said their weight was about right ii. (Figure 10) 60% of obese boys believed that they were too heavy whilst 40% believed that their weight was about right ii. (Figure 10) Obesity prevalence is predicted to double by 2025 among young people with an increase from 2003 in obesity from17% for boys to 19% & 16% for girls to 22% in 2010 v. Obesity Headline Statements (Children)

16 Figure 9 Health Survey for England The Information Centre, Available at: Overweight & obesity prevalence by GO region & gender, 2006

17 Figure 10 Men in England Men in Scotland Women in England Women in Scotland Health Survey for England The Information Centre, Available at: BoysGirls

18 References i Office of National Statistics (2008) Statistics on Obesity, Physical Activity & Diet: England. January, The Information Centre, Lifestyle Statistics. Available at: nal.pdf ii Health Survey for England The Information Centre, Available at: iii The Scottish Health Service Scottish Executive Health Department, 2005 Available at: iv Health Survey for England 2002: Department of Health, Available at: yForEngland/Healthsurveyresults/DH_ yForEngland/Healthsurveyresults/DH_ v Forecasting Obesity to Department of Health, Available at:


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