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Family Treasures from Denmark & Norway A Peek Into Scandanavia’s Past & Present By Michele Jacobsen.

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Presentation on theme: "Family Treasures from Denmark & Norway A Peek Into Scandanavia’s Past & Present By Michele Jacobsen."— Presentation transcript:

1 Family Treasures from Denmark & Norway A Peek Into Scandanavia’s Past & Present By Michele Jacobsen

2 Denmark and Norway Linked by History and Location

3 Denmark’s Nisser Elves Needlepoint Wall Hanging –Ancient links with Christianity –Past and Present links with Christmas –Legend of Risengrod

4 Nisser are Scandinavian relatives of the pixie and imp. There is an ancient story that our Lord, when he expelled the fallen angels, let some of them drop down upon the hills, where they live still, and are called “Bjergfolk” (mountain goblins), or “Trolde” (imps). They are always afraid, and flee away when it thunders, which is for them a voice from heaven. Others fell down in the alder moors; they are called “Elverfolk” (alder folks), and among them the women are very handsome to look at, but not to trust; their backs are also hollow, like a dough-trough. Others fell down in old farms and houses; they became dwarfs and “Nisser” (elves). Where the Nisser Come from… An Ancient Danish Story

5 Christmas Traditions in Denmark In Denmark, Christmas is known as "Jul," an old Nordic word that means "feast." Its celebration begins four Sundays before Christmas Eve with Advent, which celebrates the coming of Christ. On December 23, it is Lille (little) Jule (Christmas) Aften (Eve)-- and this is the celebration for the elves and the animals. The elves get big bowls of Julegrød (Christmas porridge) --rice pudding/porridge (usually warm) -- their favorite dish. Usually the Danish mother makes lots of rice pudding because she serves it to her family on Christmas Eve, the next evening. Christmas is celebrated on the 24th of December in Denmark, with a Christmas dinner for the whole family. Presents are traditionally unwrapped after dinner.

6 Tricky Nisser Elves Every December, Denmark is overrun by a host of the little folk known as Nisser. Although having a similar taste in clothing to Father Christmas, Nisser tend to favour a more practical look, preferring grey trousers (or skirt for Mrs. Nisse), wooden shoes and a long pointed red cap. But watch out! Nisser have a tendency to misbehave if they don't get their way, and for generations Danish children have been pacifying them with little bowls of risengrød or rice porridge hidden in the attic. In fact the only real proof of the Nissers' existence is that somehow the porridge is gone the next morning!

7 Nisser’s Julegrød Song There is a very famous song about the Nisser and his or her rice porridge: –På loftet sidder nissen med sin Julegrød, sin Julegrød... –Han nikker og han spiser for han er så glad –For Julegrød er hans beste mad! A rough translation… –In the attic sits the elf with his Christmas porridge, his Christmas porridge –He nods and he eats because he is so glad –Cause Christmas porridge is his favorite food!

8 Traditional Risengrød Risengrød (serves 4) 3/4 cup whipping cream 2 tablespoons sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 cups rice porridge Serve with red fruit sauce on top. A very old tradition calls for mum to slip in just one unchopped whole almond.A very old tradition calls for mum to slip in just one unchopped whole almond. Somehow the laws of chance seem always to dictate that this almond will end up on the plate of the youngest child, qualifying the lucky recipient for the almond gift. This is traditionally a small pig shaped from fine marzipan, or other special chocolates!Somehow the laws of chance seem always to dictate that this almond will end up on the plate of the youngest child, qualifying the lucky recipient for the almond gift. This is traditionally a small pig shaped from fine marzipan, or other special chocolates!

9 Norway’s Nisse is not very much like Santa Claus. Actually, there are several types of Nisse in Norway. Nisser are elves or gnomes whose legend precedes Christianity. The best-known Nisse is Fjosnisse, who is short and bearded, wears wool clothes and a red knit cap, plays tricks on people and animals, and lives in a barn or stable. The Christmas Nisse is Julenissen, who is closer to the American Santa Claus, delivering presents to children - but delivering them through the front door and not by coming down the chimney. Norwegian Nisse Common Scandanavian Links... Norwegian Nisse

10 Norway’s Tuftebrua, Near Geilo China Plate from Farmour and Far Far –Story of Tuftebrua –Past and Present links with Geilo, Norway –Legend of the Tuftebrua Troll

11 What is Tuftebrua? A Historical Bridge Near Geilo in Western Norway

12 Legend of the Tuftebrua Troll First “Troll” Bridge… –An angry troll lives under Tuftebrua, and challenges those who want to cross. Three Billy Goat’s Gruff

13 Legend According to Arne Thoresen The Tuftebrua is similar to the the bridges we build for deer, elk, and bears close to Banff and Lake Louise. The old Norwegians hired a troll, who was in jail for bad behavior, to go down there, and watch over the bridge so the bad animals, like the sheep from the mountain, wouldn't go over the bridge into town. One day, the troll just disappeared. He probably ran off to be with the other trolls.

14 Tuftebrua & Geilo, Norway

15 New Tuftebrua Local Scenery


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